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5 Dimensions Of Critical Digital Literacy: A Framework

5 Dimensions Of Critical Digital Literacy: A Framework | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
5 Dimensions Of Critical Digital Literacy: A Framework (RT @tysonkimberly: 5 Dimensions Of Critical Digital Literacy: A Framework: http://t.co/45TDRQSIHy @TeachThought)...
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Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from iPads in Education
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Some Very Good iPad Apps for Fighting Writer's Block ~ EdTech & MLearning

Some Very Good iPad Apps for Fighting Writer's Block ~ EdTech & MLearning | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Writer's block is  a crippling condition in which one's creative process slows down to the minimum. It's a symptom of 'creativity blockage' which hits writers. People differ in how they deal with their writer's block but one effective way we have at our hands is the use of technology. There are several iPad apps that can provide writers with all kinds of prompts and incentives to write creatively.  Below is a sample of some of the best iPad apps to help you with writer's block. We invite you to check them out and share with us if you have other suggestions:

Via John Evans
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Financial Literacy for Communication Professionals - Communication World

Financial Literacy for Communication Professionals - Communication World | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
In today’s increasingly competitive business landscape, an understanding of financial matters is an important life skill.
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View the Babson Survey Research: Open Educational Resources Report

View the Babson Survey Research: Open Educational Resources Report | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

This report, funded by a grant from The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation with additional support from Pearson, examines the attitudes, opinions, and use of Open Educational Resources (OER) among teaching faculty in U.S. higher education.


Via John Shank
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John Shank's curator insight, November 7, 2014 11:02 AM

Enormous implications for the adoption of OERs in Higher Ed. Check David & Phil make great points @opencontent  @PhilOnEdTech #edtech #OERs #OpenAccess #eLearning #ALA

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Two Suggested Screencasting Tools for Communicating Information

Two Suggested Screencasting Tools for Communicating Information | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
May is a busy month. In lieu of my normal weekly newsletters for staff, I have elected to use a few screencasting applications to communicate information. Screencasts are brief video recordings tha...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Sue Osborne's curator insight, May 19, 8:16 PM

I love this idea. I could send a booktalk video to staff of suggested holiday reading instead of my usual newsletter!  Time to play!

Ressources pour les cours d'anglais's curator insight, May 20, 6:34 AM

Touchcast et movenote.

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There's a medical revolution underway, and it will soon make our current ... - Business Insider

There's a medical revolution underway, and it will soon make our current ... - Business Insider | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
We've made astounding steps forward.
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Social media, mobile devices and online news: 2015 data and charts that speak to digital trends - Journalist's Resource

Social media, mobile devices and online news: 2015 data and charts that speak to digital trends - Journalist's Resource | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
2015 collection of data visualizations and charts showing changing patterns of news access, web traffic and social media use that can help put recent trends in perspective.
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An examination of factors that influence the number of information security policy violations in Qatari organizations: Information and Computer Security: Vol 23, No 1

An examination of factors that influence the number of information security policy violations in Qatari organizations: Information and Computer Security: Vol 23, No 1 | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
An examination of factors that influence the number of information security policy violations in Qatari organizati… http://t.co/7PNM5Yj3ai
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Plagiarism is a mortal sin and last taboo – or is it?

Plagiarism is a mortal sin and last taboo – or is it? | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Many people contribute to an academic paper and not many are credited. In the words of Pharrell Williams, there are blurred lines
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Banning smartphones in schools make students better: Research : News, News - India Today

Banning smartphones in schools make students better: Research : News, News - India Today | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
A new research has proved that banning phones in school has improved students' performance academically.
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The Ethics Police?: The Struggle to Make Human Research Safe

The Ethics Police?: The Struggle to Make Human Research Safe | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
When it comes to medical research using human beings, who decides what's right? What does
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Reflection on Connectivism and Information Literacy

Reflection on Connectivism and Information Literacy | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
NOTE: This blog post and research paper has been revised and expanded. It has been published in a peer-reviewed journal. Please access that article for my most complete treatment of this topic. Tra...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Elizabeth E Charles
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Ludmila Smirnova's curator insight, May 30, 2013 11:35 PM

AN interesting read

Unni Sørsveen's curator insight, September 17, 2014 3:20 AM

Jeg lærer stadig noe nytt!

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ProQuest Document View - Making As Thinking

ProQuest Document View - Making As Thinking | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Abstract:

The process of manual material manipulation is disappearing from daily life.

Why is it that we still have an educational and social environment that does not put the same priority on practical and theoretical knowledge as is does on virtual academics? This disconnect is particularly poignant in a field such as design that should demand the mastery of both. As a modern nation, we have repressed manual skill and incremental learning by fostering an educational climate geared solely towards the desire for white-collar status. We base the accreditation of our grade schools on the rate of their college placement and that mentality carries over to society at large. This trend has been going on long enough that the students currently in college have no longer had the opportunity to witness their fathers or even their grandfathers doing something as simple as changing the oil in the family car. Traits of competency and creativity that might actually have been hereditary at one point in time have been repressed to the point that successive generations are not even aware of them. Students have not been exposed to the possibilities and honor contained within these activities. We have a generation and a half of people who exhibit no mastery of their stuff and we have students getting to their senior year of college before realizing that there is a creative outlet that makes use of the material intelligence they seek. They learn to tap threads in a hole at the age of twenty-one and I end up teaching middle school shop to college seniors.

In the field of design, this lack of understanding carries over to the products created. Designers who don't make for themselves do not consider the values of object interaction that would be appreciated by an individual who makes. This results in crop after crop of products that help perpetuate a cycle of material unawareness, of waste and of limited development of the user/object relationship.

Via Kim Flintoff
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Education Is Harmful When You Measure the Wrong Things - Huffington Post

Education Is Harmful When You Measure the Wrong Things - Huffington Post | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
"Measure the wrong things and you'll get the wrong behaviors." This simple statement succinctly characterizes why the American education system continues beating its head against the wall.


Throughout education, an increasingly rigid, closed loop of assessment is systematically making schools worse: Define things children should know or be able to do at a certain age; design a curriculum to instruct them in what you've decided they should know; set benchmarks; develop tests to see if they have learned what you initially defined; rinse and repeat.

This narrow, mechanistic approach to education does not correspond to the reality of child development and brain science, but the metrics and assessment train charges down the track nevertheless.


So what's wrong with that, you might ask? Isn't school about teaching kids stuff and then testing them to see what they've learned? In a word, "No." It simply doesn't work, especially with young children.

As Boston College Professor Peter Gray wrote in a recent Psychology Today article:

Perhaps more tragic than the lack of long-term academic advantage of early academic instruction is evidence that such instruction can produce long-term harm, especially in the realms of social and emotional development.

"Direct instruction" does increase scores on the tests the instruction is aimed toward, even with very young children. This self-fulfilling prophecy is not surprising. But multiple studies also show that the gains in performance are fleeting -- they completely wash out after 1-3 years when compared to children who had no such early direct instruction.


Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 16, 11:50 AM
Measure the wrong things and you'll get the wrong behaviors." This simple statement succinctly characterizes why the American education system continues beating its head against the wall.


Throughout education, an increasingly rigid, closed loop of assessment is systematically making schools worse: Define things children should know or be able to do at a certain age; design a curriculum to instruct them in what you've decided they should know; set benchmarks; develop tests to see if they have learned what you initially defined; rinse and repeat.

This narrow, mechanistic approach to education does not correspond to the reality of child development and brain science, but the metrics and assessment train charges down the track nevertheless.


So what's wrong with that, you might ask? Isn't school about teaching kids stuff and then testing them to see what they've learned? In a word, "No." It simply doesn't work, especially with young children.

As Boston College Professor Peter Gray wrote in a recent Psychology Today article:

Perhaps more tragic than the lack of long-term academic advantage of early academic instruction is evidence that such instruction can produce long-term harm, especially in the realms of social and emotional development.


Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 18, 10:09 PM

Teaching and education are relational, thus hard to define and hard to measure. Perhaps, Paul Ricoueur's ideas about narrative work better where we use metaphors, myth, and poetic language.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Some Very Good iPad Apps for Fighting Writer's Block ~ EdTech & MLearning

Some Very Good iPad Apps for Fighting Writer's Block ~ EdTech & MLearning | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Writer's block is  a crippling condition in which one's creative process slows down to the minimum. It's a symptom of 'creativity blockage' which hits writers. People differ in how they deal with their writer's block but one effective way we have at our hands is the use of technology. There are several iPad apps that can provide writers with all kinds of prompts and incentives to write creatively.  Below is a sample of some of the best iPad apps to help you with writer's block. We invite you to check them out and share with us if you have other suggestions:

Via John Evans