Research Capacity-Building in Africa
4.8K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Gender & Protection in East Africa
onto Research Capacity-Building in Africa
Scoop.it!

What does women's empowerment have to do with nutrition? | WFP

What does women's empowerment have to do with nutrition? | WFP | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

This week, as we celebrate International Women's Day, I have been reflecting on the numerous links between empowering women and improving nutrition. I was part of a panel at the UN International Trade Centre chaired by Arancha Gonzalez, which focused on women, and entrepreneurship, which afforded a chance to remind people how fundamentally important nutrition is to women's empowerment.

Women are clearly the most critical target group from a nutrition standpoint. So many adverse health outcomes like stunting are determined by the health and nutritional status of women and adolescent girls. Women are also critical to food and nutrition security. They comprise 40% of the world's labour force and undertake maternal roles central to the development of the next generation. In Africa, most food from smallholder farmers is produced by women, particularly in commodity sectors like coffee and cocoa. The workforce of the coffee industry in Ethiopia, for example, is 80% women.
 
As the role of women in society continues to evolve, along with the welcome increase in numbers of women entrepreneurs, landowners, farmers and community leaders, it is vital to help them be the best they can be, enabling both gender equality and the benefits of improved nutrition for future generations. But we cannot escape the challenges and obstacles. If we look at the overall nutritional status of women we still see that 50% of all pregnant women are anemic and at least 120 million women in less developed countries are underweight. These women often give birth to underweight children that are stunted.

If we look at women's role in food production, we continue to see enormous discrimination: women in the agricultural sector receive less than 10% of credit offered to small-scale farmers, only 7% of agricultural extension services, and own less than 1% of all land. The UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) estimates that if women farmers had the same access as men, agricultural output in 34 developing countries would rise by an estimated average of up to 4%. This could reduce the number of undernourished people in those countries by as much as 17%, translating to up to 150 million fewer hungry people.

 

Lack of access by women to education and training also has a striking impact on nutrition. In 2011, the HUNGaMA Report conducted the biggest ever public survey on hunger in India, covering nearly 20% of Indian children. It concluded that mothers' education level determines their children's nutritional status, finding rates of underweight and stunted children significantly higher among mothers with lower levels of education. Amongst illiterate mothers the survey showed the prevalence of underweight children at 45% and child stunting at 63%. Among mothers with 10 or more years of education, prevalence of underweight children was much lower at 27%, and child stunting 43%.

 

Investments in women and overcoming these obstacles continue to be the best bet in development. The evidence is clear - when women farmers have the opportunity to earn and control income, they are more likely to focus their spending on their children's nutrition, education and health. Improving the knowledge and status of women within the household and at the farmer group level would deliver significant improvements to agricultural production, food security, child nutrition, health and education.

 

It is for this reason that GAIN has created programs that not only strive to address nutrient gaps, but also to educate and empower women. One example is our work with the WORLD FOOD PROGRAM in Rajasthan, India. Here we have collaborated to deliver a project to produce supplementary food rations for children aged 6 to 36 months and for pregnant and lactating women, as part of the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS). Using semi-illiterate women organized in self-help groups, they have been trained and now own and operate production facilities that produce almost 300 metric tons a year of high quality blended food for ICDS. With this investment we hope to reach 37,500 children aged 6 to 36 months and 17,500 pregnant and lactating women by the end of the project. So, in addition to improving the nutritious value of the food rations, the project brings economic and social empowerment to these women through income generating activity. We are expanding this project to other states in India and it is an example of how so much more can be done through investing in women.

 

A larger scale example is in Bangladesh where GAIN is working to improve nutrition of female workers and their children in the textile industry. The garment industry is one of Bangladesh's biggest sources of income and employs 2.4 million people of which 84% are women, and the majority of them are of reproductive age from 18 to 35 years old. Almost half of these women are anemic and with their children suffer various forms of malnutrition. Moreover, we know from the Rana Plaza disaster last year how terrible the working conditions are in these clothing factories. This project, which has just started, aims to increase regular consumption of more nutritious foods. Women workers will have direct access to fortified foods and/or micronutrient supplements in factories and their children under-five to micronutrient supplements. Moreover, guidance is provided to factory management to support breastfeeding and to upgrade and improve the day-care centers. Workers will also receive extensive training on nutrition including appropriate infant and young child feeding practices, sexual and reproductive health from experienced health trainers. The project will reach about 100,000 workers and children. The benefits are to the women and their families, but are also in line with new global efforts to persuade companies to see returns in terms of reduced time off for ill health, poor productivity. There is no reason why we cannot roll this out to reach all women garment workers in Bangladesh.
 
We cannot end malnutrition if we do not invest in women. There are so many opportunities to invest in women, and we learn over and over again that these investments have the highest return on investment in development. As we celebrate International Women's Day, let's make sure we are refocusing our efforts on empowering women.

 

Marc Van Ameringen, Executive Director of the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN), was recently awarded the World Food Program "Hunger Hero Award" by UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon.


Via Robin Landis
more...
No comment yet.
Research Capacity-Building in Africa
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Edumorfosis.it
Scoop.it!

[Slideshare] Learning in the Modern Workplace

Keynote at Learn4Dev Annual Meeting, 16 June 2016. Held at UNFAO, Rome, Italy

Via Edumorfosis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Edumorfosis.it
Scoop.it!

10 reasons every teacher needs a Professional Learning Network

10 reasons every teacher needs a Professional Learning Network | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
According to Marc-André Lalande, “a Personal Learning Network is a way of describing the group of people that you connect with to learn their ideas, their questions, their reflections, and their references. Your PLN is not limited to online interactions, but it is that online, global interactive part that really makes it special. It is personal because you choose who’s part of that group; you choose if you want to lurk–just check out what people are saying–or if you share; because you choose when to do so, and how to do so.”

As for this graphic? You can thank Sylvia Duckworth, who always does a great job sharing simple sketch notes to help teachers. (She also took our 12 Rules of Great Teaching and created a predictably wonderful graphic to supplement the text, among others.) We’ve taken her graphic and provided starting points for each ‘reason’ a teacher need a PLN.

Via Edumorfosis
more...
Luis Estrem's curator insight, June 19, 8:28 AM
La colaboraciones son claves el desarrollo de nuevos procesos y formas de aprender.
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Edumorfosis.it
Scoop.it!

Comprehensive guide to Concept Mapping

A concept map is a diagram or graphical tool that visually represents relationships between concepts and ideas. Most concept maps depict ideas as boxes or circles (also called nodes), which are structured hierarchically and connected with lines or arrows (also called arcs). These lines are labeled with linking words and phrases to help explain the connections between concepts.

Via Edumorfosis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Learning Technology News
Scoop.it!

Five storytelling techniques to support literacy in the classroom

Five storytelling techniques to support literacy in the classroom | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

Storytelling in the classroom can be a powerful way to support literacy. Children can be so absorbed in the tale, they are inspired to retell what they’ve heard to others, motivated to read it for themselves and encouraged to take it further and write their own parts or versions.


Via Nik Peachey
more...
Nik Peachey's curator insight, June 9, 4:11 AM

Some nice tips and ideas.

Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from E-Learning-Inclusivo (Mashup)
Scoop.it!

How can universities uphold values in international partnerships?

How can universities uphold values in international partnerships? | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

"Image from poster for "Universities in a Dangerous World" conference"


"Universities that set up shop globally should work to uphold principles such as academic freedom, gender equity and freedom of speech -- but they sometimes compromise, scholars argue."


Summary from Academica Top Ten - Thursday, June 16, 2016


"How do universities ensure proper ethics in international partnerships? Universities will sometimes compromise on principles like academic freedom, gender equity, and freedom of speech when establishing campuses in other countries, writes Elizabeth Redden for Inside Higher Ed. The author highlights some of the takeaways from a recent conference on the subject, which brought experts together to discuss some of the ways that schools can structure their partnership agreements to better protect their institutions' values internationally. As one US higher ed leader notes, there is always the “challenge of bringing liberal education to societies and environments which are difficult, where it’s not familiar, where you’re not used to doing this type of education and where you might have creeping authoritarianism.”"


Via iPamba, juandoming
more...
No comment yet.