Research Capacity-Building in Africa
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International School Library Month - Developed and Presented by #IASL


Via Lourense Das
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International School Library Month

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Lourense Das's curator insight, October 8, 2013 2:18 PM

Press Release which you may use or adapt for any advocacy opportunities such as local newspapers or school newsletters in relation to International school library month #islm2013:

 

International School Library Month is celebrated around the world in October.

The celebration highlights the contribution which school libraries make to the lives of students and their families in developing a passion for learning and preparing them for life.

 

This year's theme is "School Libraries: Doorways to Life" and an international Skype Project and Bookmark Project provide the opportunity for  students to connect around the world.

On the IASL website are many translations of this theme: http://www.iasl-online.org/events/islm/2013islm/theme-translations.htm.

During the month many schools and countries will be posting about their activities and celebrations for ISLM: http://www.iasl-online.org/events/islm/2013islm/what-are-people-doing.htm.

 

Our school/community has been involved by.... [enter your own content]

 

All the very best in all the celebrations around the world!

And don't forget to contribute your celebrations to the IASL website by emailing iasl@mlahq.org.

 

Elizabeth Greef

 

IASL VP Advocacy and Promotion

Research Capacity-Building in Africa
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8 Useful Educational Web Tools for Research Students via @medkh9

8 Useful Educational Web Tools for Research Students via @medkh9 | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
There are a wide variety of web tools and mobile applications that facilitate researchers work and  help them communicate and collaborat

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Math Links for Week Ending Sept 23, 2016 via @DavidPetro

Math Links for Week Ending Sept 23, 2016 via @DavidPetro | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
It took me a while to finally put this post together but I finished it this week. I played Pokemon Go all summer with my kids and, as i

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Math Links for Week Ending Sept 23, 2016 via @DavidPetro
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Deep learning with Google tools: 20 ideas via @MattMiller

Deep learning with Google tools: 20 ideas via @MattMiller | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Packaging the abilities of several Google tools together can lead to deep learning around a single topic. Here are some ideas.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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[PDF] Classroom of the future

[PDF] Classroom of the future | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Will classrooms still exist 20 years from now? Do we have traditional classrooms in a physical sense anymore? What is the classroom anyway? For most of us, a classroom consists of four walls, ‘closed’ doors, chairs, tables, perhaps a blackboard, and sometimes a desk - simple but efficient pieces of furniture. A quick glance at the history of pedagogical practices reveals that the classroom has scarcely evolved over a period of many years. Is the traditional classroom intrinsically outdated or has it rather survived the test of time because it is already self-reconfigurable and has been adapted in many different contexts of use? Do we even need a classroom anymore? Do we need a teacher in the classroom? What do we teach and what do we want pupils to learn? What kinds of knowledge and skills will be required in the future? These are some of the questions that we should bear in mind when thinking about the classroom of the future.
 
Over the last few decades, our understanding of learning and the conditions under which it is facilitated have substantially improved. In most contemporary theories, learning is conceived as a constructive and social activity, as a result of which the roles of the teacher and the learner within the classroom have been redefined. Development in technologies that can be used to enhance and support learning has been even more rapid. Nonetheless, it would appear that the majority of the classrooms in today’s schools and universities remain unreached by these developments. In our roles as students, parents, tax payers, policy makers, teachers, designers, or researchers, the future of the classroom is an important issue of concern to many of us. It is certainly an issue that has the potential to fire one’s imagination. It is also an issue that can unite people from various educational and vocational backgrounds or divide them even further. However, despite the wide range of ideas and perspectives on this topic, multi-disciplinary efforts to design the classroom of the future are scarce. Our presumptions surrounding the classroom are alive and well and for most of us, classrooms are something very physical. We therefore need multiple perspectives to shake up our own traditional way of thinking about classrooms and to stimulate a real discussion concerning what the classroom actually is.

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António Leça Domingues's curator insight, September 20, 3:21 AM
Sala de aula do futuro em anĂ¡lise.
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Leaders as teachers

Leaders as teachers | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

Leadership may not be the first word that comes to mind when describing teachers. In fact, some exhaustive lists of teacher descriptors, such as this one, include such predictable terms as prepared, enthusiastic, and supportive, but mention nothing specific about leadership. Nevertheless, as a former classroom educator who now coaches executives, I strongly believe that there are many things that leaders of all stripes can learn from teachers.

 

Teachers mold us from our youngest years and give us a foundation for life, regardless of the particular paths that we eventually choose. They are, outside of our parents, the first true leaders in our lives and those that we turn to for knowledge, guidance and direction. Many of us emulated our teachers and wanted to grow up to be like one or more of them.


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