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Protesters defiant amid Hong Kong stand-off

Protesters defiant amid Hong Kong stand-off | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

"Tensions escalated on Sunday when the broader Occupy Central protest movement threw its weight behind student-led protests, bringing forward a mass civil disobedience campaign due to start on Wednesday.  China's leaders must be sitting uncomfortably in Beijing.

As long as the protests continue, there is a chance they will spread to the mainland, where many are unhappy with one-party rule.  But if the protesters hold their ground, how far will Beijing allow events to spiral before getting directly involved?"


Via Seth Dixon
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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 6, 5:42 AM

Protesters defiant amid Hong Kong stand-off

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 6, 3:36 PM

Seeing all of these protesters laying across the highway caught my interest.  These people are serious about what they want with their elections and it is not have their candidates picked out for them.  People are taking over roads, shopping malls, schools, whereever they can go to prove their point.  They know that the amount of police forces is not enough to stop them.  Although for the most part other countries are staying out of the business of China Britain is supporting the protests as long as they stay within the rules of protesting.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, October 6, 3:42 PM

It will definitely be interesting to see how far this political protest goes and how far the Chinese Government will go to stop this. China in some ways is a victim of its own success, in the past China would have been able to simply throw its military might on the political dissidents and silence all opposition but how possible is that today? Now China is a global economic power and the Western World's view on China matters, not wanting to risk trade problems China is showing far more caution this time around. While China is reaping the rewards of its world position without doubt China is also missing some of the benefits of the Bamboo Curtain.

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Moving Argentina’s Capital From Buenos Aires Could Make Things Worse

Moving Argentina’s Capital From Buenos Aires Could Make Things Worse | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

"Argentina should be careful in considering the implications of the idea of moving the capital [from Buenos Aires] to Santiago del Estero. While a dramatic move might be appealing as a fresh start, it could end up aggravating the challenges of governing the country. Capitals, like flags, are symbols, but their choice has very real consequences."


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Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 23, 11:15 AM

While several of Argentina's leaders believe moving the capital to the interior of the country, this article discusses how such a move could bring about more problems than solutions. While a capital in the interior could offer a nice buffer from the pressures of a major population center, the isolation could actually have a negative effect and lessen the government's effectiveness. It was interesting to read the examples of other isolated capitals that have poorer governance.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, October 27, 8:22 PM

I imagine moving a capital is not an easy thing and can bring problems to the country but I also think it would have positive effects. If for example the capital of Argentina move to another city then that city will grow and so will the country's progress. So moving a capital can be good but also bad.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 28, 11:41 PM

Argentina moving the capital from Buenos Aires to Santiago del Estero may seem like a good idea, given that some would say that the capital would be better off in an area that is not so populated such as Buenos Aires. Others say that moving the capital is not good because it could result in an ineffective government and more corrupt, so on paper more the capital to an area that looks like it would be geographically advantageous, would in fact have a detrimental effect on the country.

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Fragile States Index

Fragile States Index | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

"Weak and failing states pose a challenge to the international community. In today’s world, with its highly globalized economy, information systems and interlaced security, pressures on one fragile state can have serious repercussions not only for that state and its people, but also for its neighbors and other states halfway across the globe.  The Fragile States Index (FSI), produced by The Fund for Peace, is a critical tool in highlighting not only the normal pressures that all states experience, but also in identifying when those pressures are pushing a state towards the brink of failure."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 27, 3:31 PM

How can political stability and security be measured?  What constitutes effective governance?  The Fragile States Index (formerly known as the Failed States Index) is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.  There are  12 social, economic, and political/military categories that are a part of the overall rankings and various indicators are parts of the metrics that are a part of this index are:

SOCIAL

•Demographic Pressures 

•Refugees/IDPs

•Group Grievance

•Human Flight and Brain Drain

ECONOMIC

•Uneven Economic Development

•Poverty and Economic Decline

POLITICAL/MILITARY

•State Legitimacy

•Human Rights and Rule of Law

•Public Services

•Security Apparatus

•Factionalized Elites

•External Intervention


Tags: political, statisticsdevelopment, territoriality, sovereignty, conflict, political, devolution, war.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, August 28, 12:57 AM

How can political stability and security be measured? The Fragile States Index is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 9:49 AM

APHG-Unit 4

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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, August 5, 8:10 PM

Some of the histories in maps is helpful in realising the complexities of the issues.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 11, 9:16 AM

Both History and Geography explained in these maps

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 3:10 PM

With the increasing amount of information online it can be misleading at times. I do believe this is a useful collection of maps however I feel people looking at it might get trapped in a pitfall. After looking at these 40 maps a person could feel that this is all there is to know about this subject. Yes it is informative to have this information together but it should just be the start of the conversation not the end. So often we want quick google searches with definite answers,

when some topics require a lot of research from different sources. The reader needs to make up their own pool of knowledge.

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Where Do Borders Need to Be Redrawn? - Room for Debate

Where Do Borders Need to Be Redrawn? - Room for Debate | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
What parts of the world should rethink their maps? Why and how?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 7, 11:28 AM

Maps are always changing as a new nation gets added and old lines cease to make sense. Territory is claimed and reclaimed.  This series of seven articles in the New York Times explores regional examples of how borders impacts places from a variety of scholarly perspectives.  Together, these article challenge student to reconsider the world map and to conceptualize conflicts within a spatial context.

 

Tags: bordersmapping, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 10:53 AM

WOW, some really interesting thoughtdebate points here! very very unit 4

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:05 PM

APHG-U4

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Google Maps Displays Crimean Border Differently In Russia, U.S.

Google Maps Displays Crimean Border Differently In Russia, U.S. | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

"America and its allies have refused to accept the region's separatist move to join Russia.  A look at the maps available on two Google Maps Web addresses — one ending in .com and another in .ru — shows the disparity. In Russia, Web visitors see a solid line dividing Crimea from neighboring Ukraine. In the U.S., a dotted line separates the two, implying a disputed status within the country."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 29, 2:53 PM

In this podcast we learn that this isn't the only international border dispute that is displayed differently in Google Maps.  Google uses over 30 distinct versions of international borders because there is an underlying geopolitical dimension to cartography.  This brings up more questions than it answers--How is the Kashmir displayed in India?  Pakistan?  The West Bank in Israel or Egypt?  If you haven't explored Google Maps in other languages, consider this your invitation to read maps as you would a text and to think about the political implications of making a map.   


Tags: google, mapping, borders, political.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 1, 12:33 PM

unit 1 map bias!!!

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#Truthy : Information diffusion research | #political #memes #patterns #SNA

#Truthy : Information diffusion research | #political #memes #patterns #SNA | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

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luiy's curator insight, March 21, 6:50 PM

Information diffusion research at Indiana University

 

Truthy is a research project that helps you understand how communication spreads on Twitter. 

 

We currently focus on tweets about politics, social movements and news.

 

 

Political Topics

Interactive visualizations of U.S. political conversation on Twitter :

 

- How does sentiment change over time in response to political events?

- What is most popular over time?

- Who are the most influential users?

- How does information spread in the social network?

 

 

Sentiment Timeline

- How does sentiment change over time in response to political events?

 

 

Gallery Descriptions of interesting memes:  http://truthy.indiana.edu/gallery

 

 

Meme Patterns:

What other memes are related to this one?  http://truthy.indiana.edu/memedetail?id=783&resmin=45&theme_id=4

 

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The world as it is: The influence of religion

The world as it is: The influence of religion | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

"Seldom has it been more important for Americans to form a realistic assessment of the world scene. But our current governing, college-­educated class suffers one glaring blind spot.

Modern American culture produces highly individualistic career and identity paths for upper- and middle-class males and females. Power couples abound, often sporting different last names. But deeply held religious identities and military loyalties are less common. Few educated Americans have any direct experience with large groups of men gathered in intense prayer or battle. Like other citizens of the globalized corporate/consumer culture, educated Americans are often widely traveled but not deeply rooted in obligation to a particular physical place, a faith or a kinship."


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Religion and its influence

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Eli Levine's curator insight, September 21, 12:45 PM

Other peoples, with different histories, cultures, etc, are not going to be like us.

 

Ever.

 

Period.

 

Might as well learn to accept that (and learn it in general) so that we do not invoke negative sentiments to develop.

 

 

MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 3:12 PM

APHG-U3

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 11:19 PM

Unit 3

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Scottish Independence

"Scotland is about to vote on whether to secede from the UK. There are solid arguments on both sides."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 1:04 PM

Admittedly, this video is filled with stereotypes, bad words and a strong political bias all delivered in John Oliver's trademark style--it's also filled with incorrect statements which I hope most people can recognize as humor, but it captures college students' attention.  If, however, you are looking for a more insightful piece, I recommend Jeffrey Sach's article titled "The Price of Scottish Independence," or this summary of the 9 issues that would confront an independent Scotland.  Independence in Europe today doesn't mean what it used to, and this vote will be fascinating regardless of the outcome.    


Tags: devolution, supranationalism, politicalEurope, UK.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, September 19, 4:53 PM

The Vote is in

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The 9 biggest myths about ISIS

The 9 biggest myths about ISIS | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
If you want to understand the Islamic State, better known as ISIS, the first thing you have to know about them is that they are not crazy. Murderous adherents to a violent medieval ideology, sure. But not insane.

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James Hobson's curator insight, October 6, 3:15 PM

(in-class 2 - ISIS)

This is a great education tool in the sense that data is provided in a relatively OBJECTIVE manner / just the facts. The reader is allowed to make their own opinions and conclusions.
Of that which is notable is that ISIS is not a group of disorganized rebels; rather, it is a highly organized, thought-through, structured military force. It bears some shocking resemblance to national armies, including that of the U.S., in this manner.
Also, supporters of ISIS aren't necessarily extremists. Some support it in hopes of having a new political power which would be beneficial to them. Though religion is obviously involved, politics has been a major contributor to their success.
Lastly, I was surprised that up until very recently (right before the current crisis), ISIS was a subdivision of Al-Qaeda. Even more shocking is the reason why they aren't any longer: Head Al-Qaeda officials said ISIS was being 'too violent' towards civilians. (How ironic!) A group even more extreme than Al-Qaeda is definitely something worth having knowledge about, because (although it is clichéd), knowledge of the enemy is power over them.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 6, 3:28 PM

I was interested to read the 9 myths that are associated with ISIS. Some of the myths stated were very surprising.There is so much information being passed around about this terror organization that it is hard to differentiate the truth with myth.Some of the myths that surprised me were:

Myth #3: ISIS is part of al-Qaeda.

The fact that this group was split  off from al-Qaeda for being to violent was not something that is openly talked about.

Myth #6: ISIS is afraid of female soldiers.

Isis soldiers are not afraid of fighting female soldiers however they do believe if they are killed by a woman then they will not go to paradise.

 

It is important to know all the information about this topic and to be well informed on the issues.

 

 

Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 6, 3:45 PM

This website helps to dispel many of the myths and misunderstandings about ISIS. The group is a surprisingly complex amalgamation of many different, smaller groups and nationalities that has sprung out of the recent events in the region. While the group is a result of modern developments in the area, it is still firmly based on an older history, like the ancient Sunni/Shia divide and the old Islamic Caliphate. The group is brutal in its methods because it is still competing with other terrorist/insurgent groups in the area, and brutality is one of the few messages they all understand. Intervention by more powerful Western militaries can certainly help in the fight against ISIS, but it is not the final answer. For most Americans it is easy to see ISIS as the new al-Qaida, but the reality is a very complex situation with no easy answers, and it has a long way to go until it’s resolved.

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The Toll in Gaza and Israel, Day by Day

The Toll in Gaza and Israel, Day by Day | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
The daily tally of rocket attacks, airstrikes and deaths in the conflict between Israel and Hamas.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 19, 2:26 PM

As the violent nature of the Israeli Palestinian conflict has escalated, this NY Times article monitors the major points of the last few weeks.  The possibility of 'Peace in the Middle East' feels so remote, and this Onion article parodies the difficulties of actually achieving this.  On a personal note, Chad Emmett taught the "Geography of the Middle East" course while I was at BYU and I've always appreciated his perspective; here are his thoughts on recent events.  


Tags: Israel, Palestine, conflict, political, borders.

Utah Geographical Alliance's curator insight, July 28, 3:17 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

As the violent nature of the Israeli Palestinian conflict has escalated, this NY Times article monitors the major points of the last few weeks.  The possibility of 'Peace in the Middle East' feels so remote, and this Onion article parodies the difficulties of actually achieving this.  On a personal note, Chad Emmett taught the "Geography of the Middle East" course while I was at BYU and I've always appreciated his perspective; here are his thoughts on recent events.  


TagsIsraelPalestineconflictpoliticalborders.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 6:57 PM

APHG-U3 & U4

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Conversation: Al Assad Consolidates Power in Syria

Conversation: Al Assad Consolidates Power in Syria | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Stratfor Founder and Chairman George Friedman and Chief Geopolitical Analyst Robert D. Kaplan discuss how Bashar al Assad has legitimized his authority over the course of the Syrian conflict.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 19, 7:33 PM

Stratfor specializes in global intelligence in key geopolitical regions.  Syria certainly fits that description and in this video, the two most public faces of Stratfor discuss the reasons for the Syrian Civil War from and internal perspective and also impacts from a broader outside lens. 


Tags: SyriaMiddleEast, conflict, political, geopolitics.

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Quebec Voters Say 'Non' to Separatists

Quebec Voters Say 'Non' to Separatists | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

"Quebec voters gave a resounding no to the prospects of holding a third referendum on independence from Canada, handing the main separatist party in the French-speaking province one of its worst electoral defeats ever."  

 

Quebec, which is 80 percent French-speaking, has plenty of autonomy already. The province of 8.1 million sets its own income tax, has its own immigration policy favoring French speakers, and has legislation prioritizing French over English.  But many Quebecois have long dreamed of an independent Quebec, as they at times haven't felt respected and have worried about the survival of their language in English-speaking North America.

 

Tags: Canada, political, devolution.


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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2:14 PM

Quebecois have voted against seperating from Canada and becoming a sovereign French Speaking state. Even though the Quebecois was to keep their French language and their own culture, they still voted against become a sovereign independent state but keep their strict French laws. Quebec is an interesting example of how movement affects place by how their immigrants have changed their French landscape forcing them to enact laws.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 23, 11:14 AM

What started as an election focused on the Parti Quebecois "values", containing a questionable effort to outlaw Muslim head wear and other religious symbols, ended up turning to a matter of independence for province. Possibly riding on the coattails of the recent Scottish vote, the PQ ended up losing the election and their hold on the position of Premier. Quebec already enjoys a good amount of independence, and the election seems to show that for now its good enough for the people of Quebec.