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Crowd-sourcing website reveals black-market drug prices, but its purpose is public health - The Boston Globe

Crowd-sourcing website reveals black-market drug prices, but its purpose is public health - The Boston Globe | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it
Buyers and sellers of black-market drugs report how much they paid on StreetRx.com, a website that offers a glimpse into the shadowy world of illicit drug sales at a time when an epidemic of opioid abuse rampages through the Northeast.
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The High Price of Affordable Medicine

The High Price of Affordable Medicine | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it
In the old days, blockbuster drugs were moderately expensive pills taken by hundreds of thousands of patients. Think blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes pills. But today, many blockbusters are designed to target much less common diseases, illnesses like multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis or even specific subcategories of cancer. These [...]
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Peter Ubel scrutinizes drug assistance programs.

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FDA to pharma: Watch out for unapproved Facebook claims

FDA to pharma: Watch out for unapproved Facebook claims | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it

Dive Brief:

RAPS' Alec Gaffney notes that the FDA has issued six warning letters to six different companies for posting unapproved claims on their Facebook pages in the last six months.The unapproved claims occurred not only as part of posting, but also in the "About" section.February 2015 was the highest level of Facebook regulatory oversight (in the form of warning letters) ever. 

Dive Insight:

Last summer, the FDA released draft guidance on social media policy, opening the door for pharma companies to use social media channels more effectively, while also signaling that greater regulatory oversight would be forthcoming. Not only has the FDA been policing Facebook, but also looking at tweets from pharma companies as well. As Thomas Abrams, director of the FDA Office of Prescription Drug Promotion, has noted, the FDA's social media policy is evolving. 

According to a blog post from Abrams last summer, "FDA sees social media as an important resource for industry and is committed to developing additional guidance for drug and device manufacturers that outline the agency’s current thinking," he wrote. "We do all of this work with the best interest of patients in mind."

 


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New Report From The NEJM On Clinical Trial Reporting Further Tarnishes Biopharma's Image

New Report From The NEJM On Clinical Trial Reporting Further Tarnishes Biopharma's Image | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it
The biopharmaceutical industry is a pretty big target these days. Nary a week goes by without the likes of people as diverse as Chuck Norris, Sen. Elizabeth Warren and John Oliver taking shots at the industry.
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In Big Shift, FDA Plans To Let 23andMe Market Genetic Tests To Consumers

In Big Shift, FDA Plans To Let 23andMe Market Genetic Tests To Consumers | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it
More than a year after the Food and Drug Administration barred 23andMe from marketing a broad-based genetic testing service, it looks like the FDA plans to shift gears and allow such tests to be sold direct to consumers.
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Succesful mHealth Publishing-presentation-mHealth-Summit-Israel by Research2Guidance


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rob halkes's curator insight, January 21, 2015 5:07 AM
Very insightful report about the mhealth market from a Pharma viewpoint says: publishing apps by pharma is not that easy, but has been done a lot. Learn from the information about their success!
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We Identify the Worst Technologies of 2014 | MIT Technology Review

We Identify the Worst Technologies of 2014 | MIT Technology Review | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it
What do the latest technologies to flop, fizzle, and flame out tell us about innovation?
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3 Reasons Why Pharma mHealth Apps Have Failed - HIT Consultant

3 Reasons Why Pharma mHealth Apps Have Failed - HIT Consultant | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it
Pharma mHealth companies are struggling to have an impact on the mHealth app market generating only limited downloads and usage, according to R2G's report.

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Top 10 Pharmaceutical Marketing & Sales Blogs 2014 Pharmaceutical Information by Meghana

Top 10 Pharmaceutical Marketing & Sales Blogs 2014 Pharmaceutical Information by Meghana | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it
Review of Top 10 Marketing blogs related to pharmaceuticals in 2014
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Rescue Me: The Challenge Of Compassionate Use In The Social Media Era

Rescue Me: The Challenge Of Compassionate Use In The Social Media Era | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it
Health Affairs is the leading peer-reviewed journal at the intersection of health, health care, and policy.
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Phenomenal insight to the moral and ethical questions about experimental treatments-resolving the needs of the few against the needs of the many. How to feel about their resolve?

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Jonathan Bush Urges Pharma to Take a New Look at the Pharma Business Model

Jonathan Bush Urges Pharma to Take a New Look at the Pharma Business Model | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it

Jonathan Bush tells it like it is to pharma by Lois Drapin, CEO, The Drapin Group LLC  See the whole blog here - I just take some quotes..;-)

 

First, let’s not forget his reasons for being there.  As he stated, ‘I am the proud owner of Epocrates, Epocrates, Epocrates (product announcement).”   But now let’s take that a bit further.  He presented himself as a pharma outsider.  Indeed.  And pharma is now finding itself more on the outside of the healthcare delivery process than ever before. ..

“Our business model, said Bush, “depends on the patient doing the thing that the doctor wants… in order for us to get revenue.  So we may use a web app, carrier pigeons or trained llamas to get that outcome in the office, to get that patient  to come into the office or a patient paying the bill or a patient picking up their prescription, or a patient coming back after an abnormal blood test.  That is the revenue event for Athena, not the app. “..

Pharma needs a conversion: “Pull the good thing through”

According to Bush, and you could hear a pin drop in the crowded room, pharma needs to “converts its incredible set of cures into a sustainable new business model in this era.”  In fact he had already made this statement: “There are fetters to the business model that will pull the good thing through….and this …whole sub-sector is a casting about for a business model to pull the good thing through.”

…hospitals exit the theater.  2013 is well over 150 mergers now where there are only 4,350 hospitals left and now we are down to less than 1800 decision makers in the entire two trillion dollar market or something like  1,700 and some actual buyers. ...

According to Bush, these enormous systems are faced with a similar dilemma.  “Hospitals are realizing that they actually can’t produce enough sick people by buying up primary care doctors to do this so they’re sort of struggling with ‘How am I going to expand the number of patients that I touch this hospital with?’.. 
You have seen an explosion in marketing efforts by health systems to try and to get to more patients and an explosion in accountable care efforts to get smarter about reducing hospital days. ...

Bush asked the pharma marketers in the room to not only focus on hospital days, but on hospital stay.  Here is the three-step process he admonished the community to take:

 

Take every drug you have and organize it by disease by the number of hospital days that could go away.  “Find the moments that matter financially and clinically.”Jump into the moment of care with a cure.  “There is more than one definition of the ‘cure’.”  At this point, armed with a true understanding of hospital stay, pharma can market directly to the “biospheres”…the same systems that are shutting down the ability to go doctor by doctor, the gatekeepers.  Bush says what once was your enemy, will become your friend.Follow up on the prescriptions that are written and make sure the patients get those drugs but also ‘don’t end up in the hospital.”  “Relentlessly follow up on all conditions for success,” said Bush.

 

According to Bush, athenahealth has a ‘higher percentage of patients connecting to our clients online than anyone else…much higher that Kaiser…which used to be number one at this.”  What’s in the secret sauce?

 

Pharma can sponsor a medical home program with any doctor that wants it or with any biosphere that wants it.  Using Athena’s ability to bring the right pathway to the physician and his/her patient, and to get the patient to do the thing the patient is supposed to do, pharma can activate being at the right time and at the right moment…with a cure. Find help with analyzing the hospital stay, it could be athenahealth, it could be others.Jonathan says that pharma’s marketing  style to physicians and to consumers is the turn off.  The experience of Epocrates is 12 pt. font.  Simple. Essential.  Relentless. “Think of advertising on NPR…you are extremely constrained on what you can do and say on NPR but the impact it makes when you just get down to the facts and cut all the fluff is higher in some audiences.”  To be clear, athenahealth advertises on NPR.   Physicians have learned to deconstruct, then reconstruct for a living.  “It is deconstruction discipline.”Bush believes that pharma can serve the doctor by knowing how the drug works.  Pharma can knows this too–not just that it works, but in what population and how it works best.  Pharma can know the hospitals days and stay, the deflection point, so to speak.athenahealth has the cloud and the technology.  They are able to pop up on the doctor’s portal, powered by athenahealth and have the physician message the patient as they pass a Walgreens…even if they filled a prescription at CVS last week.  Remember, athenahealth is going to get to that patient no matter what depends on it.  That is their business model.Lastly, Bush praised pharma for their clinical trials.  Too bad they don’t resemble real life.  “Of course as soon as your drug is legal, well then of course everything else is in play…the smog, the stress, the location, the fashion…everything is now part of whether your drug works.”  Therein is the market opportunity in “working the way in which drugs are fit into real life and so you become a welcome sponsor again.”    He said, ‘if this doesn’t work, if you’ve eaten already, if this doesn’t work if you miss a dose, if this works better if you cut down on animal facts, you (pharma) are in play for that.”  This is where pharma can excel.  “The more you can do to wrap real life around your drug, make your cure actually cure, the more you can point to hospital days that went away, the more those biospheres will actually be your accelerator, not your preventer.”

 

Pharma marketers are taking a new wave of “beyond the pill” marketing solutions into healthcare.  Is this really new?  ...  I think it’s time we stopped using marketing buzz words to describe what pharma needs most.  What pharma needs most, according to Bush, is a sustainable business model that pulls “the good thing through.”Lois Drapin, MPS-H.S.A.

 


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rob halkes's curator insight, May 26, 2014 5:42 AM

Actually, What Bush addresses in his speech regards the renewal of the value proposition of pharma: innovate value to physicians and to patients.

There are lots of examples for this - See here for instance.

The other site of the endeavour to pharma is the question of how! That's not an easy one: it means to rearrange the organization and its routines into performing selected and focused activities to different accounts - it means pharma needs to learn how to differentiate its pharma market approach.

I witness these projects and coach them. It takes some nerve to dare, but when a company can put it through, it will collect the returns.

Ask me, when you don't believe it. ;-)

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Startup searches healthcare social media for insights for pharma

Startup searches healthcare social media for insights for pharma | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it
As more patients turn to healthcare social media to share their stories, companies like Treato turn their conversations into insights for pharma companies.

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High drug prices skewing payouts to some physicians |
Modern Healthcare

High drug prices skewing payouts to some physicians | <br/>Modern Healthcare | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it
A close inspection of Medicare's physician payment data reveals that many of the highest-paying codes for eye doctors relate to the use of a drug for macular degeneration that costs $2,000 a dose.
Anneliz Hannan's insight:

See also Washington Post article on same topic: #drugcosts

http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/cost-of-drugs-used-by-medicare-doctors-can-vary-greatly-by-region-analysis-finds/2014/04/09/69ac93f0-c024-11e3-b574-f8748871856a_story.html?

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UnitedHealth's $12.8 Billion Answer To Expensive Prescription Drugs

UnitedHealth's $12.8 Billion Answer To Expensive Prescription Drugs | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it
In a deal that could help wrest back control over the soaring cost of prescription drugs, UnitedHealth Group’s Optum Rx Corp. will buy pharmacy benefit manager Catamaran Corp. (CTRX) for $12.8 billion. UnitedHealth Group (UNH), already the nation’s largest health insurance company, will become a giant among so-called PBMs, which are [...]
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Big Pharma But Not Such Big Money

Big Pharma But Not Such Big Money | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it
However, as the revenue figures for 2014 show, the industry in not exactly rolling in dough despite claims to the contrary.
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Will a lot of people find this tough to swallow?

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Understanding Patients' Needs with Social Media Analytics

Understanding Patients' Needs with Social Media Analytics | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it

Among the 50 largest drug makers in the world, more than half still aren’t actively using social media to engage healthcare consumers or patients. Most of them primarily use social media as a broadcasting channel, and no more than 10 are on Twitter, Facebook or YouTube.

Even with drug makers’ recent increases in digital spending, the pharmaceutical industry is repeatedly said to be a laggard in adoption of social media.

Drugmakers’ common excuse for remaining social media wallflowers is largely due to the regulatory uncertainty and the doubts on how to measure social ROI.

 

1/ The rise of the empowered patient

With the role of social media rapidly expanding, patients are increasingly turning to popular social networks, such as Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, blogs and forums obtaining and sharing information related to their health.

In the US, for example, over one third of consumers manage their own health and are using social media to help them make important healthcare decisions.

The consequent empowerment of the patient in making decisions around their treatment has led them to be more aware and have a greater say in the treatment process.

But it’s not just patients who go to social media to voice their opinions. The pharma industry has multiple stakeholders who actively research and discuss online, including patients, physicians, payers, caregivers, providers and advocacy groups.

 

This trend only heightens the imperative need for pharmaceutical companies and regulators to take notice and contribute to the overall healthcare discussion, particularly to the appropriate use of medicines.

But how do you actually know what physicians are saying about your drug?
Can you identify your patients’ primary concerns about your market leading product?

What are the conversation themes around managing the disease?
How does the online reputation of your brand compare to competitors?
Are patients switching brands and if so, why?

2/ Using social media as a research tool

The most immediate benefit that social media has to offer pharmaceutical companies is as a research tool.

The answers to the questions above require a more proactive embrace of social media analytics tools by pharmaceutical manufacturers.

Social media analytics tools, such as Brandwatch Analytics, can mine not only Twitter but also public forums, blogs, news sites, Facebook and other social networks to uncover patients and physicians’ sentiments and opinions.

One of our clients, Creation Healthcare, did exactly such a thing not too long ago. They indexed half a million healthcare professional profiles across thousands of sites using Brandwatch Analytics to understand how treatments and products are perceived by those who may prescribe them every day.

The online market research consultancy was able to spot healthcare trends and concerns months before others did. Offering unrivaled insight into the views of healthcare professionals, Creation Healthcare’s research business attracted six times more clients than before.

Identifying the opinions of healthcare professionals and patients is, indeed, a complicated process, particularly because of the amount of noise and spam surrounding pharmaceuticals. With boolean operators and rules, you can filter out spammy websites and irrelevant views.

 

3/ Using social media to foster discussions with your stakeholders

Understanding the kind of people who make up the conversation in your niche can prove far more insightful than listening only to those who mention your product or brand.

In a recent report we analyzed thousands of mentions online using social media analyticsto understand people’s attitude towards HIV treatment and to inform targeted messaging.

Their target audience is often seen as being the healthcare professional. But when analyzing all HIV discussion on social media, it turns out it’s the patients, caregivers and those that actually aren’t directly affected by HIV who offer the most powerful insights.

 

The general public spoke nearly three times more about HIV treatment than healthcare professionals, suggesting a general interest in the topic and that online influencers may differ from offline.

Diving deeper into this data, we noticed that the different stakeholders are chatting about HIV in entirely different places.

Data like this could dramatically impact how a drug manufacturer develops its communication strategies and targets its messaging.

4/ Building tailored marketing strategies

As shown below, social media analytics can be applied at various stages of a drug lifecycle; right from your drug discovery stage (understanding unmet needs) to the launch (improving your brand messaging) to the maturity stage (monitoring brand reputation and intimately connecting patients and physicians).

Insights generated during each stage can be utilized across all departments in your company.

 

If you’re still analyzing the conversation about your own brand or products, then now is the time to rethink your social media activities.

While social media is not a panacea, it provides an arguably underused opportunity across the business to research, understand and boost discussions with all healthcare consumers.

There’s no such thing as having a remarkable drug without having tailored strategies to appeal to your own target audience.

 


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Leo J. Bogee III's curator insight, March 12, 2015 5:51 PM

Among the 50 largest drug makers in the world, more than half still aren’t actively using social media to engage healthcare consumers or patients. Most of them primarily use social media as a broadcasting channe

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Hillbilly Heroin- OxyContin's Many Paths To Perdition

Hillbilly Heroin- OxyContin's Many Paths To Perdition | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it
How the American opiate epidemic was started by one pharmaceutical company.
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Perspective on the devastating impact of a painkiller opiate on Kentucky and the pending lawsuit on a drug manufacturer. 

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Why Big Pharma Must Cure its Bad Rap

Why Big Pharma Must Cure its Bad Rap | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it
VideoThe 2015 Harris corporate reputation poll is out and the news for Big Pharma isn’t good, to say the least.  In the poll—which measures the “reputation quotient” of the most visible American companies among the general public—Big Pharma ranked ninth out of 14 industries and was right in line with [...]
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37 companies reviewed in "Corporate Reputation of Pharma in 2014 - The Patient Perspective"

37 companies reviewed in "Corporate Reputation of Pharma in 2014 - The Patient Perspective" | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it

The 4th edition of PatientView's annual CORPORATE REPUTATION INDEX OF PHARMA has collected responses from over 1,100 patient groups worldwide, which comment on the state of pharma in 2014 and on the corporate reputation of 37 companies. The first report in the series, taking a global perspective, will be published in February 2015, with companies ranked for their reputation from the perspective of these patient groups. 

Over the past 3 years, the CORPORATE REPUTATION INDEX OF PHARMA has been featured by the Financial Times, by Forbes Magazine, and by numerous national and trade papers around the world. Most recently, the importance of PatientView's corporate reputation analyses was recognised in the Deloitte report, "Healthcare and Life Sciences Predictions 2020 - A Bold Future?", published in late 2014.  

As a pharma company, you may wish to obtain a preview copy (previews are only available before the report is sent to the press in early February 2015), see information here


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rob halkes's curator insight, January 18, 2015 3:47 AM

Great must see inisghts into pharma's relations to patients by @PatientView

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Two Pradaxa Post-Marketing Safety Studies Reach Different Conclusions: Which One Will Boehringer Distribute to Docs?

Two Pradaxa Post-Marketing Safety Studies Reach Different Conclusions: Which One Will Boehringer Distribute to Docs? | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it

Boehringer's anti-clotting drug Pradaxa is marketed as better and safer than warfarin, the generic and much cheaper alternative. The ads specifically mention that no frequent blood tests are needed to monitor the safety and effectiveness of Pradaxa, whereas such tests are necessary for warfarin.

This makes easier to sell Pradaxa to cardiologists and family practitioners who can pass on these obvious safety advantages to patients who need to carefully weigh benefits vs. risks of these powerful drugs. 

But this task is made much more difficult when there are two post-marketing approval safety studies that come to two different conclusions. Considering that news of the studies have been released on the same day (today), the stage is set for battling it out in public.

One study of Medicare patients -- by the FDA -- was published online inCirculation on October 30, 2014. A press release dated today (November 3, 2014; here) claimed that it "further reinforces the favorable benefit/risk profile of PRADAXA."

Another, independent study of Medicare patients, titled "Dabigatran Associated with Higher Incidence of Major Bleeding vs. Warfarin," was published online November 3, 2014 in JAMA Internal Medicine (and embargoed until 3 pm Central). That study claimed that the "incidence of major bleeding was 9 percent for the dabigatran (Pradaxa) group and 5.9 percent for the warfarin group."

How do two different studies seemingly reach two different conclusions based on the same population? And which study will Boehringer (BI) distribute to docs via its sales reps?


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Pharma Guy's curator insight, November 3, 2014 4:06 PM


Recall that BI was sanctioned for violating Clauses 2, 9.1, 3.2, 22.1 and 22.2 of the ABPI Code of Practice in 2011. The case originated from a complaint by a "general practitioner" filed with the Prescription Medicines Code of Practice Authority (PMCPA), which oversees the ABPI Code.

The PMCPA "was very concerned about the content of the press release and the briefing material for spokespersons. The [PMCPA] Panel considered that these would in effect encourage members of the public to ask their health professional to prescribe a specific prescription only medicine. The Panel was concerned about the lack of information in a consumer press release relating to side effects."

The news articles written based on BI press materials made some great marketing statements that BI could never make, such as referring to Pradaxa as a "super pill" and a "revolutionary drug." The stories also dissed the competition (warfarin) by referring to it as "rat poison." BI press materials did not refer to warfarin as rat poison and "otherwise made no disparaging remarks about the medicine," said PMCPA, which had no evidence about how warfarin had been described by Boehringer Ingelheim’s spokespersons or at any press conference. Therefore, no breach of the Code was ruled in that regard.

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Novartis named digital pharma company of the year - PMLiVE

Novartis named digital pharma company of the year - PMLiVE | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it

Via Antoine POIGNANT, MD, EuroHealthNet
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Antoine POIGNANT, MD's curator insight, September 26, 2014 11:55 AM

#digiitalpride #novartis

EuroHealthNet's curator insight, September 26, 2014 11:59 AM

#novartis #digitalpride #digital

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Will Your Child Become An Alcoholic? Scientists Identify Key Gene

Will Your Child Become An Alcoholic? Scientists Identify Key Gene | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it
Scientists have identified a gene that could prove key to identifying who will develop alcohol addiction.
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PFTV-042 -- Brenna Robinson Talks About Social Media in Pharma and Regulated Industires - YouTube

Shwen Gwee talks to Brenna Robinson (Senior Manager, Corporate Communications & Digital Strategy at Pfizer) at the WOMMA Social Hangover event @ SXSW 2014. P...
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"Don't be afraid to wade into social media", Brenna Robinson

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Pharma's role in the digital health landscape

Pharma's role in the digital health landscape | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it

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malek's curator insight, May 14, 2014 11:30 AM

The health costs, access and resources are a key driver to seeking solutions to the health dilemma that exists right now and is projected to only get worse.  

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Big Pharma stands to profit by cleaning out its medicine chests

Big Pharma stands to profit by cleaning out its medicine chests | Research and Tech for Life | Scoop.it
NEW YORK (Reuters) - Leading global pharmaceutical companies have started to view their vast portfolios of older, established prescription drugs as vehicles for raising large sums of cash to fuel development
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Divesting the old to make investments in the new.

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