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Will Tidal and Wave Energy Ever Live Up to Their Potential? - Yale Environment 360

Will Tidal and Wave Energy Ever Live Up to Their Potential? - Yale Environment 360 | Renewable energy | Scoop.it
As solar and wind power grow, another renewable energy source with vast potential — the power of tides and waves — continues to lag far behind.
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Unspoken Death Toll of Fukushima: Nuclear Disaster Killing Japanese Slowly

Unspoken Death Toll of Fukushima: Nuclear Disaster Killing Japanese Slowly | Renewable energy | Scoop.it
The Japanese government is still in denial and refuses to recognize the disastrous consequences of the Fukushima nuclear catastrophe, London-based independent consultant on radioactivity Dr. Ian Fairlie states, adding that while thousands of victims have already died, thousands more will soon pass away.

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New UN report calls for transformation in agriculture | Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy

New UN report calls for transformation in agriculture | Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy | Renewable energy | Scoop.it

http://www.iatp.org/blog/201309/new-un-report-calls-for-transformation-in-agriculture

 


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Eric Larson's curator insight, March 6, 2015 10:43 AM

Doing something different?

Sammie Bryant's curator insight, March 22, 2015 10:03 PM

this relates to our agriculture unit in APHUG. in this article, the UN is calling for a "transformation in agriculture".  in order to begin to eliminate this crisis that is world hunger and continue to feed the steadily growing population, the group says we must do things such as support small scale farmers, reduce fertilizer use, create strong local food systems, etc. I think this article is a good sign. People are finally doing something about this world crisis. I think the title "wake up before its too late" accurately fits this situation.

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Revolution, Part 1: The End of Growth? | Degrowth 2014

Revolution, Part 1: The End of Growth? | Degrowth 2014 | Renewable energy | Scoop.it
RT @climate_rev: RT@Degrowth_de: Are we shifting to new form of civilization?Part 1 of @NafeezAhmed´s article: http://t.co/i5PZeV9ALq http…

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9 Habits of a Great Farmer - Organic Farming - Sustainable Agriculture - Growers Trust - Growers Trust

9 Habits of a Great Farmer - Organic Farming - Sustainable Agriculture - Growers Trust - Growers Trust | Renewable energy | Scoop.it

Farming land is no easy task. For serious growers and farmers, doing so successfully requires time, money, and a ton of effort to ensure that the farm’s harvests and plentiful and growing. In reality, the majority of farmers depend on their crops to pay their bills and keep the farms sustainable and thriving. When one aspect of the harvest fails, it is up to the farmer to create a quick and effective solution to keep the farm operating the way it should be. Organic farming methods are calculated procedures that depend upon the natural biological processes to keep farms healthy. With a mix of modern technology, the right fertilizers, and traditional farming practices, maintaining a successful farm is a real possibility. It is important, however, to remember that farming practices quickly become habits.

The best farmers throughout the world make it a point to perfect their daily habits and turn them into a thriving agriculture business. The following are the top 9 habits of a great farmer:

Staying focused on revenues to ensure that cost management is stable. Stick to budgets and cover all costs of production.Remain disciplined and resolute in keeping the harvests thriving and asking for help when help is needed.Enjoy the work. A man who has fun while farming will never work a day in his life.Learn from your farming errors and make note to not make these mistakes again.Coordinate action plans for all types of “what-if” scenarios. This leaves little room for error when an unexpected storm approaches or a certain crop is producing at optimal rates.Look at your competition and compare how your harvests stack up. Using benchmarks is an excellent way to keep improving production.Be prideful and pay close attention to your reputation. People buy from the farms that they truly trust, keep that trust by building a solid foundation of good work.Sell locally. Not only does this reduce pollution, but it is an amazing way to get involved and enrich your community.Get on board with solar and wind energy now. Alternative energy is here to stay. Farms who utilize this now will be setting themselves up for big wins in the future.

Every farmer has their own unique style. Sustainable agriculture is founded by the habits that these farmers create for their farms. Make an honest effort to be the best farmer that you can be and always remember where you came from. The best farmers have the best habits. When it comes to life on the farm, make every day count.X


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Organic Farmer Sues GM Farming Neighbor

Organic Farmer Sues GM Farming Neighbor | Renewable energy | Scoop.it
Dispute over contamination of organic farm in Australia will set legal precedent

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Giri Kumar's curator insight, February 15, 2014 9:22 PM

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA—In a landmark case, an organic farmer in Western Australia state is suing his neighbor for allegedly contaminating his crop with a genetically modified organism (GMO), GM canola. This is the first claim anywhere in the world by a “non-GMO farmer against a GMO farmer,” says Joe Lederman of the specialist law firm FoodLegal in Melbourne.

Australia lifted a nationwide moratorium on GM crops in 2009. Only the state of South Australia prohibits planting of GM crops, a ban expected to hold until at least 2019. Because it is legal to sow GM crops in Western Australia, the case now being heard in the Western Australia Supreme Court in Perth turns on whether the GM farmer was negligent in the sense of not taking strict enough measures to contain GM material on his property, says University of Western Australia legal expert Michael Blakeney, an adviser to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization.

In court documents, Steve Marsh states that his organic farm, southeast of Perth, was contaminated in 2010 by GM canola, which he claims came from Michael Baxter’s farm. As a result, that year Marsh lost his National Association for Sustainable Agriculture, Australia (NASAA) organic certification for approximately 70% of his property, on which he grows oats and rye and keeps sheep. Marsh is seeking damages of $85,000 for lost income and a permanent injunction preventing Baxter from planting GMOs within 1 kilometer of his farm.

Baxter’s lawyers contend that he maintained the required 500-meter buffer zone around his crop and say there was no justification for removing Marsh’s certification. They argue that Marsh should sue NASAA for imposing unrealistic standards. The association has zero tolerance for GM material of any sort. In contrast, the United States allows products with up to 5% GM material to be labeled “organic.” Even the European Union, where public perception of GM crops is generally negative, allows up to 0.9% GM material. “Zero tolerance is not realistic for crops growing in the vicinity of GM crops,” says plant scientist Graham King of Southern Cross University in Lismore.

The case does not question the science or safety of GM crops that have Australian regulatory approval. The outcome, however, might impact labeling and product information of both GM and non-GM foods, says bioethicist Rachel Ankeny with the University of Adelaide. She claims that such information is “currently inadequate in Australia.”

The case not only pits neighbor against neighbor; it’s also shaping up as what some see as a David versus Goliath battle. According to the Australian Associated Press, Marsh’s legal costs are being partly funded from a crowdsourced Internet appeal, while the biotechnology giant Monsanto is backing Baxter. The case is expected to run at least another week.

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IAEA Report Admits Fukushima Unit 5 Worse Than Previously Stated

IAEA Report Admits Fukushima Unit 5 Worse Than Previously Stated | Renewable energy | Scoop.it
Details found in the recent IAEA report on the Fukushima disaster admitted some key information about the events at unit 5. These details show that the events at unit 5 were much more dire than the impression given to the public. During the initial disaster little was mentioned about unit 5 as other units spiraled into catastrophic meltdowns.

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Organic Farming on One Acre or Less

Organic Farming on One Acre or Less | Renewable energy | Scoop.it
Organic farming is possible even with a small piece of land.

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Action plan for an organic future

Action plan for an organic future | Renewable energy | Scoop.it

 

Organic farming is much more than a system of agricultural production whereby pesticides, synthetic fertilisers and genetically modified organisms are not used in favour of sustainability and a better quality of life.
Wider benefits of organic farming include protection of biodiversity so that...

 

http://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20150201/environment/Action-plan-for-an-organic-future.554328

 


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How Nikolay Vavilov, the seed collector who tried to end famine, died of starvation

How Nikolay Vavilov, the seed collector who tried to end famine, died of starvation | Renewable energy | Scoop.it
Nikolay Vavilov collected more seeds, tubers and fruits than any person in history. Gary Paul Nabhan chronicled Vavilov's quest in Where Our Food Comes From.

 

 

http://www.splendidtable.org/story/how-nikolay-vavilov-the-seed-collector-who-tried-to-end-famine-died-of-starvation

 


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Oxford organic farm gets growing

Oxford organic farm gets growing | Renewable energy | Scoop.it

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The seed of an idea for an organic farm at Oxford College is beginning to take root. This spring, Oxford welcomes its first organic farmer, who will help transform a grassy field on Emory Street into a thriving, colorful patchwork of crops and a living laboratory for students.

"For several years we had had a vision of developing an organic farm, but the enabling event was the gift of land," explains Dean Stephen Bowen. The 11-plus acres at 406 Emory St. was donated to the college in 2011 by Trulock Dickson ,‘72Ox-’74C. It’s the former home of Marshall and Fran Elizer, who joined Oxford in the 1940s.

The farm will be used "to model the use of sustainable farming techniques to support our local community and to provide education and training opportunities for our students on the issues of sustainability," Bowen explains.

"The final piece was to find the right person to lead the farm," says Bowen. "We wanted someone who was not only an accomplished organic farmer, but also an experienced farm educator."

A nationwide search turned up Daniel Parson, named to Mother Nature Network’s 40 Farmers Under 40 list and recognized with the Georgia Organics Land Steward of the Year Award. Parson’s 15 years of organic farming experience includes managing the Clemson University organic farm, Gaia Gardens in Decatur, Ga. and most recently his own venture, Parson Produce, near Clinton, S.C.

Since joining Oxford in early January, Parson has dug in. His initial focus will be to ready the land for farming: planting cover crops to enrich the soil; improving the drainage and installing irrigation; and building a barn to store tools and equipment.

The first crops ­— sweet potatoes, squash, and peppers — will be planted later this spring, to be grown over the summer and harvested in the fall. The farm will produce a diversity of vegetables, "choreographed by a rotation plan," Parson explains, as well as orchard fruit, cut flowers and shitake mushrooms grown on hardwood logs.

Longer-term plans call for the construction of hoop houses, which allow cold-hardy crops to grow all winter, to extend the growing season so it matches the flow of the school year.

"My focus right now is to get the farm up and running, to have something for the students to work with," Parson explains.

And students will be involved with the farm from the very beginning, he says.

"We want to involve students as much as possible so they can learn to grow their own food, connect with the source of their food. There’s going to be a lot of hands-on learning."

Lessons from the farm will be incorporated into the classroom curriculum. Faculty from across Oxford will be invited to use the farm as a resource in their teaching, Parson says.

"Farmers today have to be growers, mechanics, business people, salesmen and marketers," he says. "So almost any field of study could reflect on the farm."

A grand opening is slated for fall 2014. "Fall is one of the great seasons in the Southeast. And every year is going to be a big fall, because right when the students arrive on campus is a great time to be planting a big fall crop," he says.

The farm is expected to reap many benefits for Oxford.

The Oxford organic farm is expected to break even financially in its first few years. Parson envisions selling produce through a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program and at farmers markets.

But because "the organic farm movement is synonymous with the local farm movement," Parson says, "the first stop will be the Oxford community." Food grown on the farm will be served in the Oxford dining hall.

In addition to "having that good food on campus," Parson adds, farm work "is a great stress reliever for folks who might be overwhelmed with studies to come out and spend some good productive time, with a tangible result, on the farm."

Later this spring, Parson and his family will move into the former Elizer home. Parson’s wife, Molly McGehee ‘07Ph.D., is currently a professor at Presbyterian College in South Carolina. She will join Oxford’s Humanities Division in fall 2014.

Parson looks forward to educating and engaging with the community.

"I want students, faculty and staff to come out to the farm as much as they want. But they will learn very quickly that if they are out at the farm, they will be put to work," he adds with a laugh.

    

 


Via Giri Kumar
Patrick Sudlow's insight:

Organic farming is the only long term and sustainable method for providing food, which is also a low carbon method. 

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