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Rescooped by Cobus Cronje from Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Eating crickets to save the world (recipes included!)

The world's growing population needs protein. Insects provide at the fraction of the cost of beef.

Via Ana C. Day
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Ana C. Day's curator insight, August 26, 2013 9:18 AM

"“There’s a golden opportunity here,” says organizer Aruna Handa, founder of Toronto-based food company Alimentary Initiatives, who is passionate about the global benefits of eating insects. “We just have to figure out how to convince people to give it a try.”

Cobus Cronje's comment, September 3, 2013 4:45 PM
Hi there! I agree. In South Africa mopani worms are very popular among some indigenous groups. The worms are harvested and then dried before packet and made available to the market. They are now appearing on the menus of some restaurants as well.
Rescooped by Cobus Cronje from Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal
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Insects a fishy solution - Guarding the guardians | Bangkok Post: opinion

Insects a fishy solution - Guarding the guardians | Bangkok Post: opinion | Renewable Energy | Scoop.it
Editorial, commentary, analysis, cartoon and blogs by Bangkok Post columnists.

Via Ana C. Day
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Ana C. Day's curator insight, August 26, 2013 7:00 AM

"Robins McIntosh's letter (''Facing down overfishing'', PostBag, Aug 24) indicating that Charoen Pokphand Foods (CPF) has pledged to use only sustainably produced fishmeal in its feeds, and reduce its dependence... 

 

It is well known that most of the world's fisheries are severely over-exploited and often heavily ''mined'' for raw material to produce low-cost fishmeal. To advance on its second objective of reducing... 

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.bangkokpost.com/opinion/opinion/366370/guarding-the-guardians. View our policies at http://goo.gl/9HgTd and http://goo.gl/ou6Ip. © Post Publishing PCL. All rights reserved.

Rescooped by Cobus Cronje from Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal
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The common housefly: Superhero of mankind!

The common housefly: Superhero of mankind! | Renewable Energy | Scoop.it
If this title does not raise an eyebrow, nothing will. Is it possible that a germ carrying, filthy thing like a housefly can have any benefits for mankind?

Via Ana C. Day
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Rescooped by Cobus Cronje from Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal
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International coop setup to promote insects for feed

International coop setup to promote insects for feed | Renewable Energy | Scoop.it
An international cooperative, International InsectCentre (IIC), has been established by more than 15 companies, universities and government agencies all interested in promoting the application of insects and insect larvae as a protein rich resource...

Via Ana C. Day
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Ana C. Day's curator insight, September 3, 2013 1:01 AM

"ICC is based in Brabant, the Netherlands and its primary function will be to facilitate and accelerate developments by developing joint projects and by realising breakthroughs in (international) legislation and regulation. Also communication and branding, organising finance and funding and coordination of research and knowledge development."

Rescooped by Cobus Cronje from Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal
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Insects as a sustainable source of protein FishfarmingXpert


Via Ana C. Day
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Ana C. Day's comment, September 3, 2013 3:21 PM
Very good news !!
Ana C. Day's comment, September 4, 2013 1:46 AM
Hope they start learning how to rear them, to avoid over harvesting and its consequences. :)
Cobus Cronje's comment, September 4, 2013 4:35 AM
Apparently in Zimbabwe over-harvesting has led to the mopani worm virtually disappearing from certain areas. In South Africa there's a concerted effort to prevent this from happening. They are focusing on redistribution of the worms in collaboration with local communities and farmers.
Rescooped by Cobus Cronje from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
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The Inside Story Of The World's Biggest 'Battery' And The Future Of Renewable Energy | CleanTechnica

The Inside Story Of The World's Biggest 'Battery' And The Future Of Renewable Energy | CleanTechnica | Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

The largest battery in the world has sat quietly in George Washington National Forest along the Virginia-West Virginia border for nearly 30 years. A five-hour drive from the nation’s capital, it sits in the middle of the Appalachians, tucked behind the Blue Ridge Mountains.

 

Very few people in the urban areas that benefit from its power know of its existence, let alone its purpose. Talk to people that live and work a few miles away in Warm Springs, Virginia, and some will have a vague awareness but will readily admit that they don’t spare a thought for how electricity gets to their outlets. Dan Gessler, who works for Dominion Power, the company that operates the facility, put it simply: “I think the vast majority of the public doesn’t even know it exists, it’s up here in the middle of nowhere out in the mountains.”

 

The Bath County Hydro Pumped Storage Facility is not really a battery in the common sense of the term, but it is the largest pumped storage facility in the world. It stores a lot of energy, which helps 60 million people in 13 states (and DC) served by the regional transmission organization, PJM Interconnection. Quite often when someone in that huge area comes home from work and turns on the lights or switches on the TV, some of those electrons flowing down the power lines are coming from two lakes on a mountain in rural Virginia.

 

When Sean Fridley, the facility’s Station Manager, looks at the Upper Reservoir perched a thousand feet above his office, he doesn’t see drops of water. He sees a thousands-of-megawatts-deep block of power, a huge amount of stored potential energy — with more output than the Hoover Dam — that he can turn on with a flick of a switch.

 

“It’s one of the biggest engineering projects, ever,” Fridley said. “The machinery is huge.”

 

But can such a massive “battery” be drained by climate-fueled drought?

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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