Regional Geography
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American Migration [Interactive Map] - Forbes

American Migration [Interactive Map] - Forbes | Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Every year, close to 40 million Americans move from one home to another. This interactive map visualizes those moves for every county in the country.

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Memorize European Countries in Under 5 Minutes with Mnemonics!

If this video helped you on a quiz, test, or assignments, please share it with your teachers and friends! Obviously this is not meant to offend anybody or ma...
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30 Days Living as A Muslim

Vimeo is the home for high-quality videos and the people who love them.
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China's one-child policy creates massive gender imbalance

The Chinese government says its so-called "one-child policy" has succeeded in reining in its population. But more than three decades after the policy's imple...

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What is life like for a child who is born HIV positive? - AlertNet

What is life like for a child who is born HIV positive? - AlertNet | Regional Geography | Scoop.it
A citizen journalist from Uganda who writes for the International HIV/AIDS Alliance’s Key Correspondents project, reports...

 

A sad, grim reality. 


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Creating American Borders

30-second animation of the changes in U.S. historical county boundaries, 1629 - 2000. Historical state and territorial boundaries are also displayed from 178...

Via Seth Dixon, Jamie Strickland, Mr Ortloff, Harmony Social Studies, Human Geography
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Jesse Olsen's comment, March 16, 2013 1:04 PM
Whooooaaaaaaa!!!!
Betty Klug's curator insight, April 27, 2013 3:50 PM

I love animation maps.  Great for getting students interested in learning.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:36 PM

This video does a fantastic job of showing how the United States has expanded and grown since its original 13 colonies. While many today might imagine that our nation was simply always this size in fact over many years of colonization, land purchases and land grabs America has eventually become what it is today.

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It’s a Girl! Documentary Film – Official Website

It’s a Girl! Documentary Film – Official Website | Regional Geography | Scoop.it
The “It’s a Girl” documentary film explores the question of why are 200 million girls missing? In India, China and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls.

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Land Unseen: What's Beneath Antarctica's Ice?

Land Unseen: What's Beneath Antarctica's Ice? | Regional Geography | Scoop.it

"Many of us tend to think of Antarctica as a sheet of solid snow and ice. But, in contrast with its peer to the north, the southern pole's ice sheet lies atop a rocky continent. What are its features, its mountains and valleys, plains and coastlines?

A new dataset from the British Antarctic Survey provides the most detailed map ever of the bedrock below, information scientists hope will enable them to better model the affects of climate change on the ice, whose melting will have an impact on climate the world over."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 14, 2013 2:12 PM

This video sheds some light on explorations to uncover truths about one of the most remote places on Earth.


Tags: Antarctica, water, physical, remote sensing, geospatial.


Johani Karonen's curator insight, June 17, 2013 4:46 AM

Talking about challanges - Amundsen and Scott sure had a tough one!

Jason, Charlie's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:33 PM

This is the Intellctual part of Antarctica. This video talks about what is underneathAntarctica. Its' ice is flowing out towardsstone sea and could contribute to sea rise. If Antarctica didn't have anymoreonce our ocean would have a major rise but Antarctica would be a new place. 

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22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other

22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other | Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Small lobsters are tearing this nation apart. ;
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The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture

The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture | Regional Geography | Scoop.it
We can be connected (or disconnected) based on where we move, how we speak, and even what sports teams we root for.

 

This article is a great source for discussion material on regions (include the ever-famous "Soda/Pop/Coke" regions).  How do we divide up our world?  What are the criteria we use for doing so?


Via Seth Dixon, Anthony Bidwell, Human Geography
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Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, August 21, 2014 10:22 AM

i believe that these fifty states are divided into three different regions that define them by what those regions are made of. Those regions im talking about are the formal, functional, and vernacular regions. Some types of examples of those regions are common language, transportaion, and mental maps. I.C.

Kedryn bray's curator insight, March 15, 9:45 AM
I think the United states does have many invisible cultural borders like the way people use certain words like soda or pop or coke. These define where different types of people love and it shows different sides of America. We are split up by many different kinds of small borders but those borders sometimes change the way we all speak and do things.
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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


Via Seth Dixon, Anthony Bidwell, Human Geography
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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

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America's Oldest Cities

America's Oldest Cities | Regional Geography | Scoop.it

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Stacey Jackson's curator insight, February 22, 2013 1:02 AM

The fact that Providence is number two on this list is likely due to the fact that we escaped the urban renewal era relatively intact, unlike so many other cities. It's interesting that Buffalo made it to #3 on the list. Most people probably wouldn't consider it as one of the "oldest cities in America." But when you consider Buffalo's rapid growth during the Canal Era, when it was an important Industrial city (once the 8th largest city in the US) and the fact that its population has been declining since the 1950, and therefore not constructing many new buildings, it isn't hard to see how Buffalo ended up with the third largest stock of prewar architecture.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 9, 2013 3:29 PM

This is a great graph that not old speaks to which cities are the oldest, but also which ones have not been excpanding much since WWII. 

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Mexico takes title of 'most obese' from America - Daily Caller

Mexico takes title of 'most obese' from America - Daily Caller | Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Mexico takes title of 'most obese' from America
Daily Caller
According to a new UN report, Mexico is now the fattest country among populous nations.
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Changing Face of the US/Mexico Border

Changing Face of the US/Mexico Border | Regional Geography | Scoop.it

This lesson plan was specifically designed with Arizona examples and aligned to the Arizona state standards, but it be easily adapted.  I saw a presentation based on this lesson at the NCGE conference as was incredibly impressed.  Also, you'll note that like this one, there are many other lesson plans freely available on the Arizona Geographic Alliance website.  

 

Tags: K12, borders, political, landscape, migration, unit 4 political.


Via Seth Dixon, Mr Ortloff, Harmony Social Studies, Human Geography
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oyndrila's comment, October 14, 2012 11:40 AM
I found very useful resources on the website. Thank you for sharing it.
Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an important lesson, especially for those who actually live in Arizona/Mexico and have seen the border itself. Learning about the Arizona/Mexican border is important and shouldn't be left solely to teaching it only in those areas. The maps included in the lesson plan are efficient and could be used in the high school setting.

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Where Americans Are Moving | Newgeography.com

Where Americans Are Moving | Newgeography.com | Regional Geography | Scoop.it

Census data reveal that Americans are still drawn to the same sprawling Sun Belt regions as before.


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Toponyms: If U.S. Cities had Kept Their Original Names

Toponyms: If U.S. Cities had Kept Their Original Names | Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Daniel Geduld put together this great map of the U.S. if some of its biggest cities had kept their original names. Some of the changes aren't all that big -- Great Salt Lake City vs. Salt Lake City isn't earth-shaking, nor is Nouvelle-Orléans vs.

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22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other

22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other | Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Small lobsters are tearing this nation apart. ;

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Bizarre Borders


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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 29, 2015 6:31 PM

Craziest thing I've ever seen!  The poor kids on Robert's Island that has to cross through Canada to go to school.  I think it's crazy that the borders were defined when they didn't even have a complete map.  Taking a guess obviously didn't work out.  It seems very difficult to define a border.  

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:39 PM

Sometimes borders between frendly neighbours like Canada and USA are less protected than borders between countries with conflicts.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 4, 2015 10:01 PM
before watching this video, to be very honest, I thought we really did have the longest straightest possible border between two countries. What really blows my mind is that there is literally a gap between the two countries signifying the border. Another one is the random tip of land that goes into Canada, but it is not really land, it is a lake. But by far, the most bizarre border to me is the Point Roberts in Alaska, where the high school students have to actually pass international borders just to go to school.
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Atlas of True Names

Atlas of True Names | Regional Geography | Scoop.it

The Atlas of True Names reveals the etymological roots, or original meanings,
of the familiar terms on today's maps of the World, Europe, the British Isles and the United States.

For instance, where you would normally expect to see the Sahara indicated,
the Atlas gives you "The Tawny One", derived from Arab. es-sahra “the fawn coloured, desert”.


Via Seth Dixon
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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:12 AM

True names give these maps a unique and historic twist.

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 17, 2013 4:57 AM

I loved looking at the map of great britain.  I hope it grabs my pupils' attention as an introduction to maps.

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 31, 2013 7:19 PM

Great to see what the original names where! Especially for those that are similar to its current name and those that are completely irrelevant!

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5 Maps That Show How Divided America Really Is

5 Maps That Show How Divided America Really Is | Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Breaking down the country by income, inequality, poverty and education.
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The 100 best places to raise a family

The 100 best places to raise a family | Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Best Life reveals which cities in America are the best — and the worst — for you and your brood.
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Persian or Iranian? Is there a Difference?

Persian or Iranian?  Is there a Difference? | Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Over the next few months, Ajam Media Collective will host a series that focuses on and describes various elements of the cultural, ethnic and linguistic mosaic that we refer to collectively as Iran...

 

What is in a name?  We know that there are subtle differences between Hispanic, Indigenous, Latino and Mexican that are bound with the history of these words and how they have been used by both insiders and outsiders to construct identity.  Likewise, the distinctions between the terms Persian and Iranian are often used interchangeably.  However there are political, ethnic, linguistic and religious connotations that shape the meanings behind these terms.  While I don't necessarily agree with all of the arguments, this is an interesting look at the historical roots of these distinctions and the ramifications of these terms.   


Via Seth Dixon, Anthony Bidwell, Human Geography
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Ms. Harrington's comment, July 3, 2012 11:17 PM
This is interesting, I have wondered this myself, when hearing a person describe themselves as Persian. The article goes on to say being Persian is a cultural subset of Iranians, who share a common language and culture. It can be conditered a cultural or political statement to call ones self Persian rather than Iranian.
Cam E's curator insight, March 4, 2014 11:23 AM

This has always been a question between my friends and I, as one of my friends identifies as Persian. In my limited experience in the US it seems that the people who identify themselves as Iranian have immigrated in the last two generations or so. In comparison to families which came over quite a few generations ago who refer to themselves as "Persian"

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 17, 2015 5:00 PM

This is an interesting phenomenon.  I believe we even have a little bit of the "that's not American"-swagger here in the U.S., but thankfully diversity is still celebrated more in our country than anywhere else.  This article points out many of the reasons why there has been and always probably will be much tension within the Middle East.  Like in Iran, most Arabic countries have several different tribes and ethnic groups residing within its borders.  The problem occurs when the countries try to make one culture, one language, or one ethnicity dominant over the others.  

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Why China and Japan Can’t Get Along

Why China and Japan Can’t Get Along | Regional Geography | Scoop.it
The resentments between China and Japan predate World War II by centuries.

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