regenerative medicine
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Cornell Bioengineers 3-D print artificial ear that looks and acts like the real thing

Cornell Bioengineers 3-D print artificial ear that looks and acts like the real thing | regenerative medicine | Scoop.it

Cornell bioengineers and physicians have created an artificial ear - using 3-D printing and injectable molds - that looks and acts like a natural ear, giving new hope to thousands of children born with a congenital deformity called microtia.

 

Over a three-month period, these flexible ears grew cartilage to replace the collagen that was used to mold them. "This is such a win-win for both medicine and basic science, demonstrating what we can achieve when we work together," said co-lead author Lawrence Bonassar, associate professor of biomedical engineering.

 

The novel ear may be the solution reconstructive surgeons have long wished for to help children born with ear deformity, said co-lead author Dr. Jason Spector, director of the Laboratory for Bioregenerative Medicine and Surgery and associate professor of plastic surgery at Weill Cornell.

 

"A bioengineered ear replacement like this would also help individuals who have lost part or all of their external ear in an accident or from cancer," Spector said. Replacement ears are usually constructed with materials that have a Styrofoam-like consistency, or sometimes, surgeons build ears from a patient's harvested rib. This option is challenging and painful for children, and the ears rarely look completely natural or perform well, Spector said.

 

To make the ears, Bonassar and colleagues started with a digitized 3-D image of a human subject's ear and converted the image into a digitized "solid" ear using a 3-D printer to assemble a mold. They injected the mold with collagen derived from rat tails, and then added 250 million cartilage cells from the ears of cows. This Cornell-developed, high-density gel is similar to the consistency of Jell-O when the mold is removed. The collagen served as a scaffold upon which cartilage could grow.

 

The process is also fast, Bonassar added: "It takes half a day to design the mold, a day or so to print it, 30 minutes to inject the gel, and we can remove the ear 15 minutes later. We trim the ear and then let it culture for several days in nourishing cell culture media before it is implanted." The incidence of microtia, which is when the external ear is not fully developed, varies from almost 1 to more than 4 per 10,000 births each year. Many children born with microtia have an intact inner ear, but experience hearing loss due to the missing external structure.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Three-dimensional graphene foam as a biocompatible and conductive scaffold for neural stem cells

Three-dimensional graphene foam as a biocompatible and conductive scaffold for neural stem cells | regenerative medicine | Scoop.it

Neural stem cell (NSC) based therapy provides a promising approach for neural regeneration. For the success of NSC clinical application, a scaffold is required to provide three-dimensional (3D) cell growth microenvironments and appropriate synergistic cell guidance cues. A team of scientists reports now the first utilization of graphene foam, a 3D porous structure, as a novel scaffold for NSCs in vitro. It was found that three-dimensional graphene foams (3D-GFs) can not only support NSC growth, but also keep cell at an active proliferation state with upregulation of Ki67 expression than that of two-dimensional graphene films. Meanwhile, phenotypic analysis indicated that 3D-GFs can enhance the NSC differentiation towards astrocytes and especially neurons. Furthermore, a good electrical coupling of 3D-GFs with differentiated NSCs for efficient electrical stimulation was observed. These findings implicate 3D-GFs could offer a powerful platform for NSC research, neural tissue engineering and neural prostheses.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Organic Social Media's curator insight, May 2, 2014 1:30 PM

Three-dimensional #graphene foam as a biocompatible and conductive scaffold for neural stem cells

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Organovo – The Company Behind The First Commercial Bioprinter - 3D Printing Industry

Organovo – The Company Behind The First Commercial Bioprinter - 3D Printing Industry | regenerative medicine | Scoop.it
Organovo is a company that specialises in bioprinting – the laboratory engineering of tissue. Bioengineering is also the focus of several other universities and research instates.

Via Gerd Moe-Behrens
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Tissue engineering combined with gene therapy can manage repair of defective ... - News-Medical.net

Tissue engineering combined with gene therapy can manage repair of defective ...
News-Medical.net
Tissue engineering combined with gene therapy technology has the potential to manage the repair of defective articular cartilage.
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