Reforming Europe'...
Follow
Find
3.5K views | +0 today
Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy
Opinions, proposals and analysis for a better CAP
Curated by Alan Matthews
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

News and Views on the EU's CAP

News and Views on the EU's CAP | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it

I am Professor Emeritus of European Agricultural Policy at Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. This curated topic gathers news and opinions on the future of the EU's Common Agricultural Policy. It is inevitably both a partial and a personal perspective on issues that I find of interest but which I think are worth passing on to others. Selection does not imply endorsement. The topic complements my own views and analysis of CAP issues which readers can find on the www.capreform.eu blog. Click on the RSS symbol above to be updated through your preferred feed reader. Background picture credit Malcolm Totten www.picturesofireland.ie used with permission.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

CAP direct payments to be reduced by 1.30% in 2015 | Agricultural and Rural Convention

CAP direct payments to be reduced by 1.30% in 2015 | Agricultural and Rural Convention | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it
The EU Commission adopted a proposal on the application of the financial discipline mechanism for the CAP budget for 2015.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

EU Ready to Lift Duties on Most US Goods for Trade Pact - Moneynews

EU Ready to Lift Duties on Most US Goods for Trade Pact - Moneynews | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it
“The Daily Star EU Ready to Lift Duties on Most US Goods for Trade Pact Moneynews The offer will be made on Monday, a week ahead of face-to-face talks between EU trade chief Karel De Gucht and his U.S.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

Scottish Government reveals plans to give CAP support only to active farmers

Scottish Government reveals plans to give CAP support only to active farmers | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it
“NEW proposals to ensure only active farmers can receive direct support under the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) have been unveiled by the Scottish Government.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

Trading away meat standards?

Trading away meat standards? | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it

The TTIP (Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership) trade deal between the EU and the US is taking place behind closed doors.  Olga Kikou of Compassion in World Farming asks whether the focus on trade will sidestep other important considerations including food safety, labelling, animal welfare and the future of small farms?

Alan Matthews's insight:

This blog post collects a range of arguments or concerns about the proposed TTIP agreement. While there is a basis for some of the points raised and we must see how these are addressed as the negotiations progressed, other concerns simply use the TTIP as a whipping boy for general discontent against the perceived ills of a particular kind of industrial agriculture. Expect to see these arguments discussed repeatedly as the negotiations proceed.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

EU farm policy 2014-2020: MEPs approve new CAP regulations and transition measures

EU farm policy 2014-2020: MEPs approve new CAP regulations and transition measures | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it

European Parliament (press release) EU farm policy 2014-2020: MEPs give final blessing to greener and fairer CAP European Parliament (press release).

 

The CAP reform process, launched in Parliament in 2010, reached its final stage in June 2013 when negotiators for Parliament, the Council and the Commission reached a political agreement on the major issues. .

 

The final plenary vote comes after another round of negotiations in which the remaining issues have been resolved. The voted package includes four regulations on 2015-2020 EU farm policy and a regulation setting transitional rules for 2014. Read more in the background note (link to the right)

 

Result of votes

 

The draft regulation on the direct payments rules was approved by 440 votes to 238, with 10 abstentions.

The draft regulation on the rural development rules was approved by 576 votes to 101, with 11 abstentions.

The draft regulation on common market organisation was approved by 426 votes to 253, with eight abstentions.

The draft regulation on financing, management and monitoring rules was approved by 500 votes to 177, with 10 abstentions.

The draft regulation on transitional rules for 2014 was approved by 592 votes to 81 votes, with 14 abstentions.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

Meat traders celebrate EU/Canadian trade deal - GlobalMeatNews.com

Meat traders celebrate EU/Canadian trade deal - GlobalMeatNews.com | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it
“Meat traders celebrate EU/Canadian trade deal GlobalMeatNews.com However, he hoped that the CETA might encourage Canada to comply with the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) recommendations and lift the ban on EU beef, veal and sheepmeat.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

Guidelines for implementing the EIP in Rural Development programmes | IFOAM EU

IFOAM EU, TP Organics and ARC 2020 have developed guidelines explaining how Rural Development programmes can implement the EIP. The Rural Development regulation specifies that the EIP shall promote a transition towards agroecological production systems. The EIP is meant to be a bottom-up process. Organic associations should take this opportunity and convince their national or regional authorities to implement the EIP for the benefit of organic farming and agroecology. The guidelines are meant to help in this regard.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

EC rejects full country-of-origin labelling for meat products - GlobalMeatNews.com

EC rejects full country-of-origin labelling for meat products - GlobalMeatNews.com | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it
“EC rejects full country-of-origin labelling for meat products GlobalMeatNews.com The report, which is still to be finalised, is expected to recommend that such labelling would only mention the country where a source animal was finished and...”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

EUROPA - PRESS RELEASES - Press release - Amending EU budget 2013 in line with MFF political agreement

EUROPA - PRESS RELEASES - Press release - Amending EU budget 2013 in line with MFF political agreement | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it

The Commission has adopted today the second instalment of its Draft Amending Budget 2 from 27 March 2013, amounting to EUR 3.9 billion after reallocation of available resources within the budget. The Council (Member States) and the European Parliament have already adopted the first instalment (EUR 7.3 billion) after agreeing to split the original Draft Amending Budget 2 in two in the course of the negotiations on the next financial period (Multiannual Financial Framework, MFF 2014-2020).

This proposal is linked to the adoption of the MFF as the European Parliament has stated that having an absolute guarantee that the outstanding payment claims for 2013 will be covered in full is one of the conditions to give its consent to the MFF regulation covering the next period (2014-2020).

Alan Matthews's insight:

This draft amending budget is still a proposal and has to be approved by the budgetary authority: the Council (EU Member States) and the European Parliament.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

OECD report says CAP reform insufficient

OECD report says CAP reform insufficient | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it

The EU has taken a step forward by starting to reform its agricultural policy, but the reforms are insufficient, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) wrote in its annual report, released on 18 September, on aid for the agricultural sector. The reforms currently being finalised hardly break away from the current direction and scope of agricultural support in the member states, says the OECD, which is pushing for a global reorientation of aid in the sector.

 

Regarding “greening,” “much of it will depend on implementation,” said Franck van Tongeren, who works in the OECD’s Trade and Agriculture Directorate. In order to be effective, the tool – which makes the allocation of 30% of farmers’ subsidies conditional on them respecting ecological measures – should “be applied at country or regional level, rather than applied to individual farms,” said OECD agricultural policy analyst Morvarid Bagherzadeh.

Alan Matthews's insight:

The OECD report can be downloaded from http://www.oecd.org/tad/agricultural-policies/monitoring-and-evaluation.htm

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

How to kill off successful environmental schemes in Europe’s agriculture policy

How to kill off successful environmental schemes in Europe’s agriculture policy | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it

Tony Long, European Policy Officer of the WWF, warns that if member states are tempted to shift funds from Pillar 2 rural development to Pillar 1 direct payments the environment will suffer.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

Cows are disappearing from our landscape: the impact of industrialisation on animal welfare and farmers

Cows are disappearing from our landscape: the impact of industrialisation on animal welfare and farmers | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it
Across Europe, the continued growth of non-grazing farming methods is causing cows to vanish from the landscape. However, new research is showing grazing dairy cows to be a more viable way forward. Moving cows to ‘indoor’ farming systems is a growing trend. Economic modelling predicts that without actions, based on historic trends, only one-third of milking cows in the Netherlands will have access to grazing in 2025, compared with two-thirds currently. This is partly due to beliefs that higher yields will be achieved, and that greater control around diet makes animal management easier. This report by the LEI Research Institute of Wageningen University, Grazing in North West Europe - Economic Performance and Future Developments with Emphasis on the Dutch Situation, shows how grazing can remain an attractive option, especially when promoted by public and private policy interventions. Lower costs associated with feed and housing on grazing farms, for example, continue to create profit while non-grazing animal feed and energy costs are likely to rise and remain volatile. 

 

Alan Matthews's insight:

The report concludes: "To maintain grazing in the North-West European dairy industry, governments and other stakeholders should invest in knowledge development and technological innovation on grazing issues. Important are the development of tools and systems that simplify grazing management on large farms and assistance of farmers in their management and strategic choices. To obtain good economic results it is crucial that farmers opt for a clear strategy with respect to grazing. Grazing or no grazing should be one of the core strategic decisions. This study concludes with two main routes to maintain or extend grazing: 1) expand or introduce the (Irish) full grazing system with low housing costs, a seasonal production profile and a lower milk production per cow; 2) maximise the fresh grass intake in restricted grazing systems; 3) allow cows access to pasture in no-grazing systems to give opportunities to exhibit natural behaviour and maintaining cows visible in the landscape".

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

CAP Reform in England, status report on Direct Payments - Farming & Agriculture - NewsLocker

CAP Reform in England, status report on Direct Payments - Farming & Agriculture - NewsLocker | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it
This status report, which sets out a factual update on direct payments (including “greening”), will be of relevance to those with an interest in how we implement the revised Common Agriculture Policy (CAP) in England.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

GM food policy: Trade disruptions from zero thresholds may cause 'severe ... - FoodNavigator.com

GM food policy: Trade disruptions from zero thresholds may cause 'severe ... - FoodNavigator.com | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it
FoodNavigator.com GM food policy: Trade disruptions from zero thresholds may cause 'severe ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

Country of origin labelling rules for pigs and poultry need beefing up, say MEPs

Country of origin labelling rules for pigs and poultry need beefing up, say MEPs | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it
All the latest news from the Press Service of the European Parliament: votes, resolutions, debates, parliamentary committees and the plenary.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

EU court annuls GM potato approval, dealing blow to Commission

EU court annuls GM potato approval, dealing blow to Commission | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it

Europe's second-highest court on Friday (13 December) overturned a decision by the European Commission to allow the cultivation and sale of a genetically modified potato developed by German chemicals group BASF. This post explains the background to this decision.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

Trade deal 'won't loosen standards,' EU and US officials ay

Trade deal 'won't loosen standards,' EU and US officials ay | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it

EU and US negotiators have promised that a free trade deal will not harm consumer protection or environmental standards.

 

The two sides noted they would publish a state of play document following the next round of talks, expected to take place in Washington on 16 December.

 

But while enthusiasm for an accord between two sides - which have a combined global market share of more than 40 percent - remains undimmed, the timeline is set to be loosened.

 

EU officials accept that a deal will not be struck in 2014, with 2015 the earliest possible date for a final agreement, which will require the support of the European Parliament and the US Congress.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

Trade deals need not be bad news for Europeans

Trade deals need not be bad news for Europeans | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it

Dire warnings against opening the floodgates to farm produce from north and south America are being trotted out again.

 

An EU trade deal has been agreed with Canada, talks continue with the US — and negotiations with Mercosur countries in south America haven’t gone away.

However, the deal with Canada reveals that trade agreements need not be bad news for most European farmers, as long as European consumers insist on high food standards.

 

With a trade deal promising a multi-million euro annual improvement in the EU-US trade balance, negotiators might risk upsetting EU farmers in order to win valuable new non-food exports in a trade deal, but not at the cost of tens of millions of EU consumers protesting against allowing in hormone beef.

Alan Matthews's insight:

This article puts some of the hype around the agricultural aspects of the recently-concluded EU-Canada trade deal in perspective. Removing tariffs may have little effect on trade if regulatory restrictions remain in force.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

Public sector research scientists and farmers organisations express concerns about EU GMO policies and regulations

Public sector research scientists and farmers organisations express concerns about EU GMO policies and regulations | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it

At the occasion of World Food Day, PRRI and various European farmersâ�� organisations  expressed in a letter to the EU Institutions  their concern about the impact of EU GMO policies and regulations on the potential of modern biotechnology to strengthen sustainable food production.


The letter starts with recognising that the EU regulatory system for GMOs, with  scientifically sound risk assessment as the basis for informed decision making, worked as it was designed for several years.However, since the second half of the 90s, some member states and EU institutions have, in a reaction to public concern in various food areas, embarked on some very counterproductive policies with regard to GMOs.The signatories call upon the EU institutions and Member States to take a broader, more holistic, and longer term view on agricultural production of food, feed and biomass, and to adjust the GMO policies and regulations accordingly.
Alan Matthews's insight:

The Commission 2010 proposal to break the GMO logjam by allowing member states to prohibit GM cultivation in their countries on certain grounds has been stalled in the Council, despite efforts under the Danish Presidency in 2012 to find a compromise.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

Facts and figures of the EU-Canada Free Trade deal

Facts and figures of the EU-Canada Free Trade deal | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it

According to this European Commission press release, the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) between the EU and Canada will generate substantial new trade in goods and services as well as additional opportunities for investment. The new market access provided by the agreement will further improve the position of EU exporters and investors on the Canadian market. Once implemented, the agreement is expected to increase bilateral trade in goods and services by 22.9% or €25.7 billion, fostering growth and employment on both sides of the Atlantic. Overall, the EU-Canada agreement could lead to GDP gains for the EU of up to €11.6 billion per year.

 

The agricultural elements are as follows:

The agreement will rapidly – largely at entry into force - eliminate duties on agriculture. By the end of the transitional periods, Canada and the EU will liberalise, respectively, 92,8 % and 93,5 % of trade lines in agriculture. As regards products considered sensitive: dairy for Canada and beef, pork and sweet corn for the EU, it has been agreed that new market access, amounting to a further 1 % and 1,9 % of tariff lines respectively, will be granted in the form of tariff rate quotas. On prepared agricultural products (PAPs) more specifically, which are a major EU export interest and where the EU has a major export surplus with Canada, the outcome is particularly ambitious. The EU PAPs industry will considerably gain from CETA as all the PAPs tariffs will be eliminated. Wines and spirits deserve a special consideration within the PAPs group for their particular export relevance. The EU is Canada’s major import source of wine – about half of its imports. The tariff elimination here is complemented by the removal of other relevant trade barriers which will significantly improve access to the Canadian market for European Wines and Spirits.

Alan Matthews's insight:

Don't hold your breath. As Simon Lester points out on this blog post http://worldtradelaw.typepad.com/ielpblog/2013/10/the-canada-eu-trade-agreement-is-here-almost.html ratification of the deal will be complex and could take up to 24 months, perhaps requiring all 28 EU members to ratify, as well as a green light on key issues from Canada's 10 provinces.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

Canada PM heads to Brussels to try to seal delayed EU trade deal | Reuters

Canada PM heads to Brussels to try to seal delayed EU trade deal | Reuters | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it

OTTAWA (Reuters) - Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper will fly to Brussels on Thursday in a bid to seal a free trade treaty with the European Union, his office said on Wednesday,signalling an end to negotiations that have dragged on much longer than planned.

 

Canada initially said a deal would be struck by December 2011. It then pushed that back to December 2012 as the two sides struggled to overcome disagreements over pharmaceuticals, financial services, patents as well as beef and dairy exports,

Alan Matthews's insight:

It seems that a key understanding on quota levels of Canadian beef and pork exports to Europe has already been reached, see http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/economy/canada-eu-achieve-breakthrough-in-free-trade-talks-sources-say/article14441495/ thus removing one of the contentious issues before today's meeting

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

New rules on Common Agricultural Policy reform approved by Council committee

New rules on Common Agricultural Policy reform approved by Council committee | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it

On October 7 EU chief executives at the Special Committee on Agriculture meeting (SCA) have approved the compromise texts of Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) reform (new rules related to direct payments, rural development, single CMO and horizontal regulation).

“It’s an important step towards the entry into force of the Common Agricultural Policy reform. The new rules set the guidelines for the future of EU agriculture and give certainty to our farmers to plan directions of farm development, investments, financial plans,” noted Lithuanian Minister of Agriculture prof. Vigilijus Jukna.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

Controversy on ILUC relevancy, ahead of Parliament vote

Controversy on ILUC relevancy, ahead of Parliament vote | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it

On 11 July, the European Parliament Environmental Commission proposed to account ILUC factors in the European energy policy, in order to encourage more sustainable bioefuels – that do not compete directly with food and feed crops, such as wastes and agricultural residues.

 

The final vote on bioefuels in the European Parliament plenary meeting, expected to take place next Wednesday (11 September) in Strasbourg. The vote on has been postponed from Monday to Wednesday, due to the complexity of the matter, according to Albert Dess, Spokesman of the Agricultural Committee in the European Parliament speaking at a conference last Friday 5 September.


The 11 September vote is on the initial European Commission policy proposal to introduce a 10% minimum quota for renewable energy sources in the transport fuel used, and to reduce by 65% the C02 emissions by 2020 in the EU.

 

On 11 July, the European Parliament environmental committee voted that biofuels, produced from food and energy crops, must not exceed 5.5% of total energy consumption for transport purposes by 2020. The committee also proposed for  ILUC factors to be considered when subsidies are granted in support for achieving the minimum quota.  

 

This stand-point differs from that of the Industry and Agricultural committees, which have proposed a 6,5%, respectively a 10% quota for traditional fuels. The industry sector, strongly represented at the event, believes that a 5,5% cap and the consideration of ILUC factors would represent a sign of insecurity for the investors, and would bring distress for the sector.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

Researchers revise 'overestimated' biofuels subsidies

Researchers revise 'overestimated' biofuels subsidies | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it
Experts, who estimated that the biofuels industry received the equivalent of
a €10-billion “Cyprus bailout” in public support in 2011, have shaved
the figure by a fifth.
Alan Matthews's insight:

IISD estimated the annual subsidy to biofuels in the EU in a report earlier this year at €9,272–€10,653 million. The figures and methodology of the report were criticised, among others, in this report by Ecofys which was funded by the German biofuel industry association http://www.biokraftstoffverband.de/index.php/detail/items/subsidies-for-biofuels-highly-overestimated-review-shows-great-deficiencies-in-report.html. Subsequently, IISD revised their estimates of the benefit from the fuel tax excise and now calcuate the value of subsidies at €5,515–€6,896 million http://www.iisd.org/gsi/news/addendum-biofuels. Their conclusions, however, remain unchanged.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alan Matthews
Scoop.it!

Is biomass the next biofuel controversy?

Is biomass the next biofuel controversy? | Reforming Europe's Common Agricultural Policy | Scoop.it

Draft proposals to regulate the use of biomass to generate energy, critics say, place the European Union on track to repeat the mistakes it made in its policy on biofuels, increasingly seen as doing more harm than good.

 

A draft version of a Commission proposal seen by Reuters details sustainability criteria for biomass. They include a minimum greenhouse gas savings of 60 percent compared with fossil fuel, avoiding producing raw material in areas of high biodiversity and harmonised accounting rules to prevent each member state setting different standards.

 

"Biofuels are really just the tip of the bioenergy iceberg. With current biomass policies unchanged, we are likely to meet our renewable energy target while increasing rather than decreasing emissions," Ariel Brunner, head of EU policy at BirdLife International, said.

more...
No comment yet.