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Inbound Marketing & the Next Phase of Marketing on the Web

Inbound Marketing & the Next Phase of Marketing on the Web | Referral Marketing | Scoop.it
The numbers this fall aren't good.
After a high above 14,000 last year, the Dow is now thrashing around well below 9,000. The U.S. government isspend
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roots of the inbound web

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History of Marketing Infographic

History of Marketing Infographic | Referral Marketing | Scoop.it
The entirety of Marketing History in a single infographic!
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History of marketing infographic

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Pop culture club - Elite Business Magazine

Pop culture club - Elite Business Magazine | Referral Marketing | Scoop.it
Elite Business Magazine is the fastest growing entrepreneur, start-up and small and medium-enterprise (SME) title in the UK. Brought to you by publisher and events co-ordinator CE Media
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George Smart, owner of Theobald Fox, the creative agency, says creating a memorable campaign is the name of the game. “Nowadays to make something catchy you have to be creating something that consumers will buy into, share around,” he explains. “There’s been a massive shift between consumers and advertising. The best advertiser is now the consumer.”


Does this mean the days of using traditional pop culture endorsements – the face of George Clooney plastered over your not-so-average coffee machine, for example  – are a thing of the past? Goodman thinks so, taking the view that this as a ‘dying area’ and claiming that “if you are going to identify brands with these big pop culture names or concepts then at least make it useful and add some value.” However, Smart disagrees. “People will always have heroes,” he explains. “And pop culture has seen all sorts of reference points that make up people’s lives and define them in terms of how they mix their interests.”


It’s well and good debating the merits of a star-studded advertising campaign, but the million dollar question for your average SME is ‘what can I do to compete with the big boys?’ Nick Moutter, CEO of Admedo, an ad-buying platform, says SMEs can be slightly slow on the uptake when it comes to advertising and culture-based marketing, partially as a result of budget constraints. He recommends smaller companies think a little out of the box to get the best for their money. 


He concludes: “If you’re a small business and you put something quirky in front of someone that isn’t the standard ad, you’re going to get a better return.” 

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forrestersocialwebtable.png (540×533)

forrestersocialwebtable.png (540×533) | Referral Marketing | Scoop.it
Melissa Tsang's insight:

decentralization, customer advocacy? more equitable marketing?

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Seth's Blog: Permission Marketing

Seth's Blog: Permission Marketing | Referral Marketing | Scoop.it
Permission marketing is the privilege (not the right) of delivering anticipated, personal and relevant messages to people who actually want to get them. It recognizes the new power of the best consumers to ignore marketing. It realizes that treating people...
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"One of the key drivers of permission marketing, in addition to the scarcity of attention, is the extraordinarily low cost of dripping to people who want to hear from you. RSS and email and other techniques mean you don't have to worry about stamps or network ad buys every time you have something to say. Home delivery is the milkman's revenge... it's the essence of permission.


Permission doesn't have to be formal but it has to be obvious. My friend has permission to call me if he needs to borrow five dollars, but the person you meet at a trade show has no such ability to pitch you his entire resume, even though he paid to get in.


Subscriptions are an overt act of permission. That's why home delivery newspaper readers are so valuable, and why magazine subscribers are worth more than newsstand ones."

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The History of Marketing Infographic

Discover, Share, and Present presentations and infographics with the world’s largest professional content sharing community.
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Interesting - the dot com bubble spelled the end of outbound marketing

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New Wave of Advertisers Consider Consumers the New Medium

Good stuff on the evolution of ad strategy away from mediocrity, towards value and equity and entertainment value. 

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Key quotes:


-It’s not that online advertising has eclipsed TV, as some industry pundits have predicted, but it has become its full partner—and in many ways the more substantive one, a medium in which the audience must be earned, not simply bought. Going viral is no longer a lucky accident or fringe tactic, but the default expectation of any ambitious campaign, on any platform.


“If it goes viral, it’s ratification of it being good ‘creative,’?” says Crumpacker, 49. “And if it doesn’t, you’re like, ‘Oh, God, what did I do wrong?’?”


-“Advertising,” they all said, “is not just a one-way street anymore.”

After decades of advertisers blaring messages at consumers, those consumers now have their own megaphones to blare back. “Before you could have written a letter and said, ‘My Glad Wrap doesn’t work, and you suck,’?” says Cal McAllister, a tousle-haired co-founder of the Seattle agency Wexley School for Girls. “But it’s not like putting that on your Twitter feed, if you have a million followers.”


-“The word ‘advertising’ is starting to get kind of old. We do ads, obviously, but we do so much more now,” says John Norman, Martin’s chief creative officer. With torn jeans, chin-length rocker hair, and a charcoal Armani scarf knotted thickly at the neck, the 45-year-old looks more like someone playing a creative director in an ad than the real item. “We used to tell stories through campaigns. And now we build stories. You set something out there in the ether, and people start to build on it or add to it or take away from it, and it becomes a bigger story.”


-“If it’s something you would go to see,” he says, “then it’s probably good.”

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The Seven Eras of Marketing: A Guide

The Seven Eras of Marketing: A Guide | Referral Marketing | Scoop.it
From simple trade to collaboration, we've seen seven distinct eras of marketing since we emerged from the caves. Here's a historical tour from Ardi Kolah.
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