Referentes clásicos
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LA MALDICIÓN DE MINERVA

LA MALDICIÓN DE MINERVA | Referentes clásicos | Scoop.it
LA MALDICIÓN DE MINERVA Herbert List, Cabeza de Palas Atenea (1937) Thomas Bruce, séptimo Conde de Elgin quería alcanzar la areté. Las malas lenguas dicen que su esposa también escocesa, Lady ...
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Referentes clásicos
Huellas de la tradición clásica en el mundo actual.
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La mirada mitològica i audaç de Pablo Picasso

La mirada mitològica i audaç de Pablo Picasso | Referentes clásicos | Scoop.it
Segueix tota la informació, entrevistes i vídeos sobre l'actualitat cultural i l'oci al diari ARA
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Timeless Bob Dylan: Inspired by the Classics

Timeless Bob Dylan: Inspired by the Classics | Referentes clásicos | Scoop.it
“I’m gonna spare the defeated, boys, I’m going to speak to the crowd,

I am goin’ to teach peace to the conquered

I’m gonna tame the proud…”

            So goes Bob Dylan’s song “Lonesome Day Blues.” As many have
noted, these lines of Dylan’s bear a striking resemblance to those of
another poet, one who lived roughly two thousand years ago in ancient Rome:
Vergil.

            Publius Vergilius Maro, or Vergil, as he is better known, is
famous for many works including the Eclogues and the Georgics, but is known
best for his epic poem the Aeneid, which he modeled after Homer’s renowned
Iliad and Odyssey. It was Augustus, Rome’s first emperor, who commissioned
Vergil to write the Aeneid, which tells the story of the hero Aeneas, the
legendary founder of Rome.

            Dylan seems to be drawing from Allen Mandelbaum’s 1971
translation of Vergil’s magnum opus, which renders the Latin as follows:

“But yours will be the rulership of nations,

Remember Roman, these will be your arts:

To teach the ways of peace to those you conquer,

To spare defeated peoples, tame the proud…”

            This particular scene takes place in Book VI in the underworld,
where Aeneas finds the ghost of his father, Anchises, who tells him (in the
lines above) what his purpose and role will be. And, as Harvard Professor
Richard F. Thomas puts it, “What does it mean that Dylan incorporated these
lines from a 2,000-year old poem into his 2001 song [“Lonesome Day
Blues”]?”[1] Thomas suggests that if we take a look at what was happening
in the early 70s when this translation was published, we may find our
answer.[2]

           The Vietnam War had been raging for fifteen years. Opposition to
the war was at an all-time high. As Muhammad Ali famously said, “Why should
they ask me to put on a uniform and go 10,000 miles from home and drop
bombs and bullets on Brown people in Vietnam while so-called Negro people
in Louisville are treated like dogs and denied simple human rights?”
Americans were horrified by events such as the My Lai Massacre in 1968,
where some 500 unarmed Vietnamese civilians were murdered and mutilated by
U.S. soldiers. The time was ripe with questioning the cost of American
power and domination in the world.

Watch a video of Dylan playing "Lonesome Day Blues" in New York City in
2001 here. 

            Vergil also knew a thing or two about questioning power and
domination in the world. Many scholars believe that the Aeneid exemplifies
Vergil’s own interrogation of the cost of empire. When he began writing the
Aeneid, Rome had just emerged from over fifty years of nearly continuous
civil wars. Just two years earlier, in 31 BCE, Octavian (soon to be named
Augustus) had defeated fellow Roman and rival Mark Antony to become sole
ruler of Rome. The idea of Rome had been so lofty and virtuous, as the
ghost of Anchises reminds us: “To teach the ways of peace to those you
conquer, / To spare defeated peoples, tame the proud…”[3] And yet, as
Professor Thomas reminds us, Aeneas does not succeed in this in the end.
Instead of showing clemency to the army and people he has defeated, Aeneas
massacres them.[4] I, for one, am convinced that Dylan found the same
dissonance between the ideals and realities of empire in the Aeneid that he
found in the United States during the Vietnam War leading up to 9/11
(incidentally, the release date of his Love and Theft album).

            Dylan’s ability to understand, digest, and draw inspiration
from classical authors such as Vergil and also Homer, Catullus and Ovid,
among others, helped place him among the ranks of the Nobel Prize winners
in Literature.

 

 Bibliography & Further Reading:

Allen Mandelbaum, The Aeneid of Virgil. A Verse Translation by Allen
Mandelbaum, Berkeley: University of California Press (1971).

Jennifer Schuessler and Dina Kraft, “Bob Dylan 101: A Harvard Professor Has
the Coolest Class on Campus,” The New York Times, Oct. 14, 2016.

Richard F. Thomas, “The Streets of Rome: The Classical Dylan”, Oral
Tradition, 22/1 (2007): 30-56.

Thomas E. Strunk, “Achilles in the Alleyway: Bob Dylan and Classical Poetry
and Myth,” Arion: A Journal of Humanities and the Classics, Third Series,
Vol. 17, No. 1 (2009): 119-136.

[1] Richard F. Thomas, “The Streets of Rome: The Classical Dylan”, Oral
Tradition, 22/1 (2007): 30-31.

[2] Richard F. Thomas, “The Streets of Rome: The Classical Dylan”, Oral
Tradition, 22/1 (2007): 31-32.

[3] Allen Mandelbaum, The Aeneid of Virgil. A Verse Translation by Allen
Mandelbaum, Berkeley: University of California Press (1971).

[4] Richard F. Thomas, “The Streets of Rome: The Classical Dylan”, Oral
Tradition, 22/1 (2007): 32.
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LISÍSTRATA: APRENDIENDO IGUALDAD DE GÉNERO - INED21

LISÍSTRATA: APRENDIENDO IGUALDAD DE GÉNERO - INED21 | Referentes clásicos | Scoop.it
Lisistrata aprendiendo igualdad género: una revisión de los aportes educativos y competenciales que tiene la representación de los clásicos en la escuela.
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Un perfume es para sienmpre

Un perfume es para sienmpre | Referentes clásicos | Scoop.it
A los profesores de clásicas nos gusta encontrar productos, comercios o empresas que tomen su nombre de algún elemento de la Antigüeda
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Comencem a ritme de... llatinismes!

Comencem a ritme de... llatinismes! | Referentes clásicos | Scoop.it
Alguns sabem que el llatí -malgrat el que molts diguin o pensin- és una llengua viva. Al llarg de la història de la música vocal s’ha
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La diosa que preside el Louvre y que inspiró la marca Nike

La diosa que preside el Louvre y que inspiró la marca Nike | Referentes clásicos | Scoop.it
La Victoria de Samotracia, cuyo nombre original es Niké, es el origen del logo y el nombre de la firma. Después de pasar por el «taller», recuperó hace apenas dos meses su sitio en el museo
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"Yo he leído en Virgilio": Bécquer y Rubén Darío ante el mito grecolatino

"Yo he leído en Virgilio": Bécquer y Rubén Darío ante el mito grecolatino | Referentes clásicos | Scoop.it
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Crono y sus hijos

Crono y sus hijos | Referentes clásicos | Scoop.it
En un desembarcadero efímero a pie de playa, estregón de maderas quejicas, las aguas arrullan hombres silenciosos. Son los héroes desdibujados, reflejos de hombres niños sin nombre
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Una diosa griega con curvas brasileñas, así serán las medallas de Rio 2016

Una diosa griega con curvas brasileñas, así serán las medallas de Rio 2016 | Referentes clásicos | Scoop.it
La diosa griega de la victoria, Niké, ganó unas curvas más generosas 'a imagen de la mujer brasileña' en las 5.130 medallas de oro, plata y bronce que s
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SÍNDROME DE PROCUSTO

Un análisis del Síndrome de Procusto como ejercicio de la violencia de la uniformidad en las organizaciones y equipos.
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El latín en la publicidad, desde la antigua Roma hasta nuestros días 

El latín en la publicidad, desde la antigua Roma hasta nuestros días  | Referentes clásicos | Scoop.it
No sé si en alguna ocasión os habéis preguntado cuál fue el primer mensaje o anuncio publicitario de la historia, pues ocurrió en la antigu

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America now looks like Rome before the fall of the Republic

America now looks like Rome before the fall of the Republic | Referentes clásicos | Scoop.it
Official site of The Week Magazine, offering commentary and analysis of the day's breaking news and current events as well as arts, entertainment, people and gossip, and political cartoons.

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'Lisístratas' para frenar a Donald Trump

'Lisístratas' para frenar a Donald Trump | Referentes clásicos | Scoop.it
Anda, o andaba, por la cartelera Aristófanes, lo que me lleva a pensar que las únicas que pueden torcer el voto, hoy a favor del nazi Donal
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La col·lecció d’estiu 2017 de Mary Kantrantzou s’inspira en l’art grec | A cada passa referents clàssics!

La col·lecció d’estiu 2017 de Mary Kantrantzou s’inspira en l’art grec | A cada passa referents clàssics! | Referentes clásicos | Scoop.it
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Carreras de carros al mejor estilo romano pero con motocicletas

Carreras de carros al mejor estilo romano pero con motocicletas | Referentes clásicos | Scoop.it
Algo así sólo podía pasar en la primer mitad del siglo XX, cuando las demandas no abundaban y el mundo parecía más temerario. Pero sea cual fuese la razón,
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Mark Zuckerberg y La Eneida de Virgilio

Mark Zuckerberg y La Eneida de Virgilio | Referentes clásicos | Scoop.it
Mark Zuckerberg pasa delante del Coliseo. Foto: formiche.net Sabíamos ya que Mark Zuckerberg tiene La Eneida de Virgilio como uno de sus libros de referencia y que esta obra ha sido siempre para él una fuente importante de inspiración. Conocíamos también que la cita virgiliana “La fortuna favorece a los audaces” (Eneida, X, 284) luce…

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Beyond the Boundaries of Fantasia: An ancient imagining of the future of leadership: how to enjoy this album

Beyond the Boundaries of Fantasia: An ancient imagining of the future of leadership: how to enjoy this album | Referentes clásicos | Scoop.it
An Ancient Imagining of the Future of LeadershipThough concept albums have long been imagined as courses of study, this project is, to our knowledge, the first course of study to be conceived of a
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6 anuncios de televisión que se inspiraron en el mundo clásico

6 anuncios de televisión que se inspiraron en el mundo clásico | Referentes clásicos | Scoop.it
A place to connect the University community, and to be in touch with the life on campus.
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¿Por qué las marcas de coches se sirven del latín y el griego en sus nombres?

¿Por qué las marcas de coches se sirven del latín y el griego en sus nombres? | Referentes clásicos | Scoop.it
A place to connect the University community, and to be in touch with the life on campus.
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