Regeneration
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fig06: Auxin distribution marked by DR5::GUS expression. (a) DR5::GUS signals are... - Open-i

fig06: Auxin distribution marked by DR5::GUS expression. (a) DR5::GUS signals are... - Open-i | Regeneration | Scoop.it
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Rescooped by Sophie Zhang from Plant hormones
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CUC2 as an early marker for regeneration competence in Arabidopsis root explants

CUC2 as an early marker for regeneration competence in Arabidopsis root explants | Regeneration | Scoop.it

Via Belen Marquez
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Belen Marquez's curator insight, December 31, 2013 4:40 AM

CUP SHAPED COTELYDON 2 (CUC2) was tested as a marker for shoot induction to monitor and facilitate the optimization of in vitro regeneration of Arabidopsis thaliana. The expression of a pCUC2::3XVENUS-N7 fluorescent marker allowed the observation of early steps in the initiation and development of shoots on root explants. The explants were first incubated on an auxin-rich callus induction medium (CIM) and then transferred to a cytokinin-rich shoot induction medium (SIM). CUC2-expression occurred prior to visible shoot formation during the incubation of the root explant on CIM. Shoot formation was invariably preceded by the accumulation of CUC2 expression at dispersed sites along the root explant. These patches of CUC2-expression also marked the site of lateral root primordium formation in root explants that were transferred to hormone free medium. Thus, CUC2 is a predictive marker for the acquisition of root explant competence for root and shoot organogenesis.

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Time lapse radish seeds sprouting, top and roots growing

Time lapse sequence shot using Pentax K110D and Harbortronics DigiSnap 2100 set to take a frame each 14 minutes 24 seconds. The time lapse spans 9 days. Two ...
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Pluripotency of Arabidopsis xylem pericycle underlies shoot regeneration from root and hypocotyl explants grown in vitro - Atta - 2008 - The Plant Journal - Wiley Online Library

Pluripotency of Arabidopsis xylem pericycle underlies shoot regeneration from root and hypocotyl explants grown in vitro - Atta - 2008 - The Plant Journal - Wiley Online Library | Regeneration | Scoop.it

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-313X.2008.03715.x/abstract;jsessionid=602B71722D1E4A415E8E58F0AD796030.f01t01


Via Belen Marquez
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Belen Marquez's curator insight, December 31, 2013 4:33 AM

We have established a detailed framework for the process of shoot regeneration from Arabidopsis root and hypocotyl explants grown in vitro. Using transgenic plant lines in which the GUS or GFP genes were fused to promoters of developmental genes (WUS, CLV1, CLV3, STM, CUC1, PLT1, RCH1, QC25), or to promoters of genes encoding indicators of the auxin response (DR5) or transport (PIN1), cytokinin (CK) response (ARR5) or synthesis (IPT5), or mitotic activity (CYCB1), we showed that regenerated shoots originated directly or indirectly from the pericycle cells adjacent to xylem poles. In addition, shoot regeneration appeared to be partly similar to the formation of lateral root meristems (LRMs). During pre-culture on a 2, 4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2, 4-D)-rich callus-inducing medium (CIM), xylem pericycle reactivation established outgrowths that were not true calli but had many characteristics of LRMs. Transfer to a CK-rich shoot-inducing medium (SIM) resulted in early LRM-like primordia changing to shoot meristems. Direct origin of shoots from the xylem pericycle occurred upon direct culture on CK-containing media without prior growth on CIM. Thus, it appeared that the xylem pericycle is more pluripotent than previously thought. This pluripotency was accompanied by the ability of pericycle derivatives to retain diploidy, even after several rounds of cell division. In contrast, the phloem pericycle did not display such developmental plasticity, and responded to CKs with only periclinal divisions. Such observations reinforce the view that the pericycle is an ‘extended meristem’ that comprises two types of cell populations. They also suggest that the founder cells for LRM initiation are not initially fully specified for this developmental pathway.

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Farming & Agriculture: 66 Things You Can Grow In Containers

Growing your own food is exciting, not only because you get to see things grow from nothing into ready-to-eat fruits and veggies, but you also don't have to worry about the pesticides they might contain, and you definitely cut down on the miles they -- and you -- have to travel.
As it turns out, with pretty minimal effort, anyone can be a gardener. My boyfriend and I are essentially first-timers this season and so far have the beginnings of strawberries peeking out, tomatoes are on their way, the basil's about ready for a big batch of pesto, and once the last frost hits, the peppers, kale, spinach, chard, and mesclun will be on their way, too. All on a tiiiny little terrace (with the help of a little DIY carpentry).
If you're up to the challenge -- and it really isn't much of one -- growing your own food can be so rewarding. And so much cheaper! Just be sure to choose the right planter or container, learn how to maintain it properly, and go find yourself some seeds (or starter plants)!
Here's a starter list of all the crazy things even urban gardeners, without space for a garden, can grow at home.
Tree Fruits - Including Apples
1. Apples can be grown in a container; you can also grow them on the balcony or other small space using a technique called espaliering. 2. Kumquats3. Avocados (plenty of extra tips online if you search)4. Blackberries5. Blueberries (sometimes helpful videos are available online)6. Pomegranate7. Cherries8. Figs9. Pears
Citrus Fruits
Citrus trees in particular are said to be good for beginning gardeners and are easy to grow indoors, so don't let inexperience or lack of outdoor space stop you from enjoying fresh-picked, hyper-local fruit.10. Dwarf oranges11. Grapefruit12. Tangerines13. Meyer Lemons 14. Limes
Tropical Fruits
Tropical fruits can also be surprisingly easy to grow indoors, even in non-tropical climates. Such as...
15. Bananas (look for container gardening tips online) 16. Pineapple17. Papaya18.Gurvas (several varieties)
The Real Surprises
19. Hops -- yes, as in the “spice” ingredient in beer. Turns out they're easy to grow!20. Aloe Vera21. Strawberries22. Tea (well, herbal tea)23. Quinoa!
The Non-Surprises
24. Tomatoes25. Summer Squash26. Other Squashes, like Acorn and Pumpkin27. Hot Peppers28. Sweet Peppers29. Cucumbers
Melons
30. Small Cantaloupe31. Jenny Lind Melon (an heirloom cantaloupe)32. Golden Midget Watermelon
Herbs
Just about any herb grows well indoors -- just be sure that if you're going to do any container-sharing, you do your research first about which herbs co-habitate well together. (Some will hog water, for example, and leave the others dried out.)
33. Basil34. Oregano35. Parsley36. Rosemary37. Chives38. Catnip39. Thyme40. Sage41. Parsley
Leafy Greens
42. Kale43. Mesculun Greens44. Spinach45. Swiss Chard46. Lettuces (plenty of options there, from micro-greens to head or loose-leaf)47. Mustard greens48. Collard greens49. Arugula
Root Vegetables
50. Carrots51. Beets52. Potatoes
Other Healthy-sounding Stuff
53. Sprouts54. More sprouts: mung bean and lentil sprouts55. Wheatgrass56. Kohlrabi57. Turnips58. Rutabagas59. Celeriac60. Parsnips61. Jerusalem Artichoke62. Sugar snap peas63. Rhubarb (not ideal in a container, but it can work)64. Mushrooms (again, more tips online if you look)65. Pole Beans66. Aaaand... asparagus, although some disagree that it does well in a container. Try it if you're ok with a risk!
Bonus
67. You can grow your own loofah, too, but you'd need a garden rather than a container for that.
Like this idea? Be sure to check out these 6 Crazy Concepts for Micro Gardens That Actually Work to get inspiration for designing your own garden in a small space. While you're at it, check in with this Organic Gardening feature for tons more info on making your garden grow.
by Planet Green


Via Giri Kumar
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