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EarthTalk: E-waste

EarthTalk: E-waste | Recycling | Scoop.it
With electronic equipment and gadgets the fastest-growing waste stream in many countries, how to deal with so-called "e-waste" may in fact be one of the most pressing environmental problems of the 21st century.
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ITAD for Managed Services Providers: 5 Things to Look For

ITAD for Managed Services Providers: 5 Things to Look For | Recycling | Scoop.it
Whether it’s an upgrade of client print systems to more efficient modern devices or a complete transition to a cloud-capable printing environment, solution providers face a one vexing project challenge: What to do with all of those old peripherals.
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WIRED: Spider Silk Could Weave Biodegradable Computer Chips

WIRED: Spider Silk Could Weave Biodegradable Computer Chips | Recycling | Scoop.it
Spiders and insects use silk to build strong webs and spin cocoons but now scientists have figured out how to use the material for something even more amazing: electronic computer chips.

 

Nolwenn Huby of the Institut de Physique de Rennes were able to transmit laser light down a short strand of the silk on an integrated circuit chip. The silk worked much like glass fiber optic cables, meaning it could carry information for electronic devices, though it had about four orders of magnitude more loss than the glass. Huby said that with a coating and further development, the silk could one day have better transmission capabilities. The achievement could open the door to medical applications, such as silk fibers carrying light to places in the body for internal imaging. Because spider silk is incredibly thin — roughly five microns in diameter or 10 times thinner than a human hair – surgeons could perform diagnostic exams using very small openings in the body.

 

Omenetto envisions future applications where, after a medical procedure, doctors and surgeons place a silk bandage in a patient embedded with electronic functions to monitor for possible infections. The patient can be closed up and then never have to worry about having the monitoring device taken out again because the body will simply absorb the material. Already his team has developed a small implantable radio frequency heater that could sterilize an area against bacteria. With a great deal of further development, e-waste could be a thing of the past. Whenever a new snazzy cellphone comes out, you could simply compost your old model instead of leaving it to languish in a dump, slowly leaching toxic chemicals. But such electronics are still decades away, said Omenetto. Compostable circuits are one thing but engineers would still need to figure out how to make biodegradable batteries, interfaces, and everything else in modern-day electronics, he added.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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West African Inventor Makes a $100 3D Printer From E-Waste

West African Inventor Makes a $100 3D Printer From E-Waste | Recycling | Scoop.it
Kodjo Afate Gnikou, a resourceful inventor from Togo, has made a $100 3D printer which he constructed from parts he scrounged from broken scanners, computers and printers.
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North America Leading The Way In ITAD

North America Leading The Way In ITAD | Recycling | Scoop.it
Because of the lack of punitive regulation, those companies with assets to dispose do not have the same level of concern as in North America about the onward (RT @TEC_Int: North America Leading The Way In #ITAD http://t.co/u0tBwCeY0u...
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What To Do About E-Waste | Smarter Living | NRDC

What To Do About E-Waste | Smarter Living | NRDC | Recycling | Scoop.it

A helpful how-to guide for keeping your computers, cell phones and other used electronics out of landfills.

 

Our increased reliance on personal technology—laptops, cell phones, PDAs, computer monitors, printers--has resulted in vast quantities of garbage in landfills and incinerators that could have been reused or recycled. About 2.6 million tons of e-waste ended up in landfills in 2007, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, while only 13.6 percent (408,000 tons) was recycled. If Americans recycled the more than 100 million cell phones that are no longer used,the amount of energy saved would be enough to power approximately 24,000 U.S. households for one year.

 

Some of the materials in personal electronics, such as lead, mercury and cadmium, are hazardous and can release dangerous toxins into our air and water when burned or deposited in landfills improperly. And throwing away metal components, like the copper, gold, silver and palladium in cell phones and other electronics, leads to needless mining for new metals.

 

Fortunately, there is a solution: returning your used electronics for responsible recycling, rather than throwing them in the trash.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Motorola’s Project Ara Open Source Hardware Plaform for Modular Smartphones

Motorola’s Project Ara Open Source Hardware Plaform for Modular Smartphones | Recycling | Scoop.it
A few months ago, I posted a video about “The Smarter Phone“, a concept smartphone that was supposed to be serviceable and upgradeable just like PCs used to be, in order to reduce e-waste...

Via F. Thunus
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