Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation
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Put That Drink Down! Alcohol Linked to 7 types of Cancer, Study Says

Put That Drink Down! Alcohol Linked to 7 types of Cancer, Study Says | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it
If you enjoy a good tipple after a hard day's work, you may want to put that glass down. A new study says that alcohol consumption is associated with seven types of cancer.
The study, published in the journal Addiction on Thursday, found an association between alcohol consumption and cancers in seven sites of the body: the oropharynx, larynx, esophagus, liver, colon, rectum, and female breast. The strongest link was between alcohol and cancers of the mouth and throat.

The research goes on to cite figures which suggest that alcohol led to around half a million cancer-related deaths in 2012, or 5.8 percent of cancer deaths worldwide.
The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California's insight:
"Caffeine, sugar, and THC is all they're going to find in me" 
- Boiled In Lead
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To Live Longer, Study Suggests Getting Protein From Plants, Not Meat ("fish & chicken not that bad")

To Live Longer, Study Suggests Getting Protein From Plants, Not Meat ("fish & chicken not that bad") | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it

Study suggests that people who eat more red meat die sooner than those who get their protein from plants.

How much protein you eat—and where that protein comes from—may affect your lifespan, suggests research published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. The new analysis, conducted at Massachusetts General Hospital, found that people who ate a lot of animal protein had a higher-than-average risk of dying over the next few decades, especially if they favored processed red meat over fish or poultry. Those who ate more plant-based protein, on the other hand, had a lower-than-average risk of death. 

The new research included data from two prior long-term studies, which collectively had more than 170,000 total participants. The people in these studies were tracked for 26 to 30 years and also asked to answer questions about their health and eating habits every few years. On average, they received about 14% of their daily calories from animal protein, and 4% from plant-based protein. During this time, more than 36,000 of them died. 

After adjusting the results for lifestyle and other risk factors, the researchers found that those who ate the most animal protein—defined as any type of meat, eggs, or dairy—had a slightly increased risk of death. People who ate less animal protein and consumed more protein from plant-based sources—breads, cereals, pastas, beans, nuts, and legumes—were the least likely to die during the study.

The news isn’t all bad for meat lovers, though. The increased risk of death only applied to people who had at least one "unhealthy lifestyle" factor, such as being a heavy drinker, a smoker, or overweight or obese, or getting very little exercise. For participants who led overall healthy lifestyles, the link disappeared.


Via Bert Guevara, Eric Larson
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, August 16, 11:21 PM
The enemy is processed and unprocessed red meat. If you can't help animal meat, fish and chicken is better. Otherwise, this study suggests plant-based protein food.

"Indeed, when they broke down the study results into specific types of animal protein, they found that the link between animal protein and increased risk of death applied primarily to people who ate lots of processed and unprocessed red meats (including beef and pork), and not to fish or poultry.
“Our findings suggest that people should consider eating more plant proteins than animal proteins,” said Dr. Song, “and when they do choose among sources of animal protein, fish and chicken are probably better choices."
Eric Larson's curator insight, August 17, 9:20 AM
Beans over red meat for protein?
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‘Superfood’ Doesn’t Mean Anything, So Let’s Stop Using It ("There Are Superior Foods But Examine 1st")

‘Superfood’ Doesn’t Mean Anything, So Let’s Stop Using It ("There Are Superior Foods But Examine 1st") | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it

Although some foods have superior nutritional value, there’s no incentive for manufacturers to define terms like superfood. The ambiguity hides the true facts.

WE HUMANS are suckers for a promise that is too good to be true – especially if it offers a shortcut to health and longevity. That is one of the appeals of “superfoods”, which are sold as if they contain a magical elixir of life that will wash away the sins of an otherwise poor diet and inactive lifestyle. 

It is easy to dismiss such claims as marketing hype and wishful thinking. But that is too hasty. Foods vary in their nutritional value. Is it possible that some deserve the title of superfood? 

Answering that question turns out to be very difficult, not least because the definition is so vague. Despite thousands of websites and lifestyle articles devoted to superfoods, there is hardly any published research in peer-reviewed scientific journals. What is out there is, more often than not, industry-funded, published in alternative health journals and too eager to jump to scientifically questionable conclusions. 

You can find answers, though, if you look hard enough. By picking apart the boldest superfood claims, comparing their nutritional profiles with less exotic fare and talking to experts, we have come to some evidence-based conclusions, not all of which go against the grain (see “Miracle meal or rotten swindle? The truth about superfoods“). In short: some things marketed as superfoods are nutritionally superior to other, similar foods. Many more are not.


Via Bert Guevara, Eric Larson
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, August 16, 12:05 AM
Nothing beats an informed choice. There are foods that may qualify as "super", but not all that claim to be one are authentic. Many are just marketing stunts.
Do your own research and find out which are really superior than the rest.

"You can find answers, though, if you look hard enough. By picking apart the boldest superfood claims, comparing their nutritional profiles with less exotic fare and talking to experts, we have come to some evidence-based conclusions, not all of which go against the grain (see “Miracle meal or rotten swindle? The truth about superfoods“). In short: some things marketed as superfoods are nutritionally superior to other, similar foods. Many more are not."
Eric Larson's curator insight, August 16, 7:30 PM
Marketing hype or something else?
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Health Benefits of Pineapples | Organic Facts ("cures cough & colds, digestion, lose weight, etc.")

Health Benefits of Pineapples | Organic Facts ("cures cough & colds, digestion, lose weight, etc.") | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it

Pineapples can improve respiratory health, cure cough and colds, improve digestion, help you lose weight, strengthen bones, improve oral health.

Pineapples are a funny-looking fruit with a serious impact on health, and their health and medicinal benefits include their ability to improve respiratory health, cure coughs and colds, improve digestion, help you lose weight, strengthen bones, improve oral health, boost eye health, reduce inflammation, prevent cancer, increase heart health, fight off infections and parasites, improve the immune system, and increase circulation.

Arthritis Management: One of the most celebrated uses of pineapple in terms of health is its ability to reduce the inflammation of joints and muscles, particularly those associated with arthritis, a truly debilitating disease that affects millions of people around the world. Pineapples contain a relatively rare proteolytic enzyme called bromelain, which is primarily associated with breaking down complex proteins, but it also has serious anti-inflammatory effects, and has been positively correlated with reducing the signs and symptoms of arthritis in many test subjects.

Immune System: A single serving of pineapple has more than 130% of the daily requirement of vitamin-C for human beings, making it one of the richest and most delicious sources of ascorbic acid.

Tissue and Cellular Health: One of the commonly overlooked benefits of vitamin C is its essential role in creating collagen.

Cancer Prevention: In addition to the antioxidant potential of vitamin C in the battle against cancer, pineapples are also rich in various other antioxidants, including vitamin A, beta carotene, bromelain, various flavonoid compounds, and high levels of manganese, which is an important co-factor of superoxide dismutase, an extremely potent free radical scavenger that has been associated with a number of different cancers. Pineapple has directly been related to preventing cancers of the mouth, throat, and breast.


Via Bert Guevara, Eric Larson
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, August 16, 9:51 PM
Another powerhouse fruit for everyone.

"Pineapples are a funny-looking fruit with a serious impact on health, and their health and medicinal benefits include their ability to improve respiratory health, cure coughs and colds, improve digestion, help you lose weight, strengthen bones, improve oral health, boost eye health, reduce inflammation, prevent cancer, increase heart health, fight off infections and parasites, improve the immune system, and increase circulation."
Eric Larson's curator insight, August 17, 9:23 AM
Many health benefits from pineapples?
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#Accountability: What the #Food Industry Really Fears about #GMO Labeling #Greenpeace #health #Nuitdebout #France

#Accountability: What the #Food Industry Really Fears about #GMO Labeling #Greenpeace #health #Nuitdebout #France | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it
The food industry’s claim that GMO labeling will raise food costs can be easily disproved. The real reason for their opposition is a much bigger fear on their part.

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How the Zapatista Movement Can Offer Solutions to the Neoliberal Threat to Global Food Security

How the Zapatista Movement Can Offer Solutions to the Neoliberal Threat to Global Food Security | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it
The Zapatistas, primarily Indigenous Ch’ol, Tzeltal, Tzotzil, Tojolobal, Mam, and Zoque rebels, were rising up against 500 years of colonial oppression. For this piece, I draw from my experiences learning from them, not ‘researching’ them. Importantly, I neither speak for the Zapatistas nor do my words do them justice. In a sense, then, this piece is nothing other than a modest ‘suggestion’ that the Zapatistas may offer us some ideas about solutions to the problems of the food systems we find ourselves in.

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Economist's View: Drug Prices are Bankrupting America

Economist's View: Drug Prices are Bankrupting America | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it
Solvadi ... shows how publicly financed science easily turns into arbitrarily large private profits paid for by taxpayers. The challenge facing the US is to adopt a rational drug pricing system that continues to spur excellent scientific breakthroughs while keeping greed in check. Big Pharma and the US public are on a collision course when they should be partners for the advancement of health.
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The BEST Chicken Marinade Recipe

The BEST Chicken Marinade Recipe | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it
The BEST Chicken Marinade Recipe Main Dishes with extra-virgin olive oil, balsamic vinegar, soy sauce, worcestershire sauce, lemon juice, brown sugar, dried rosemary, dijon mustard, salt, ground black pepper, garlic powder, chicken breasts
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MIT States That Half of All Children May be Autistic by 2025 due to Monsanto | New Eastern Outlook

MIT States That Half of All Children May be Autistic by 2025 due to Monsanto | New Eastern Outlook | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it
Dr. Stephanie Seneff, who made these remarks during a panel presentation in Groton, MA last week, specifically cites the Monsanto herbicide, Roundup, as the culprit for the escalating incidence of autism and other neurological disorders. Roundup, which was introduced in the 1970’s, contains the chemical glyphosate, which is the focal point for Seneff’s concerns. Roundup was originally restricted to use on weeds, as glyphosate kills plants. However, Roundup is now in regular use with crops. With the coming of GMO’s, plants such as soy and corn were bioengineered to tolerate glyphosate, and its use dramatically increased. From 2001 to 2007, glyphosate use doubled, reaching 180 to 185 million pounds in the U.S. alone in 2007.


http://journal-neo.org/2015/01/26/mit-states-that-half-of-all-children-may-be-autistic-by-2025/
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On The Organic Trade Association's Betrayal Of The Movement For Mandatory GMO Labeling

On The Organic Trade Association's Betrayal Of The Movement For Mandatory GMO Labeling | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it

No one got anything good here except the pesticide and junk food industries. The red line for our movement is an on-pack disclosure that clearly indicates whether a food is genetically engineered. The requirement of QR codes as a stand in for labeling is a joke and lauding this “compromise” for trivial concessions to organic industry interests is ridiculous. What if instead of the USDA organic seal we could only use a QR code? It’s not for OTA, Organic Valley or any other organization to trade away Americans right to know what’s in the food we eat.

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Dr. Bronner`s | Makers of the Best Selling Certified Organic and Fair Trade Soaps and Personal Care Products.

Dr. Bronner`s | Makers of the Best Selling Certified Organic and Fair Trade Soaps and Personal Care Products. | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it
Makers of the best selling certified organic and fair trade soaps and personal care products.
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Monsanto Challenges Democracy in Epic Hawaiian Court Cases

Stand with the People of Hawaii to stop the Monsanto Doctrine's theft of democracy. Please sign the petition a
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Corporate Money Defeats GMO Labeling—What Would Gandhi Do?

Corporate Money Defeats GMO Labeling—What Would Gandhi Do? | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it
The deed is done. On Friday, July 29, 2016, President Obama signed a bill that was written by corporations, paid for by corporations and that serves no one in this country—except corporations. S.764, known by its opponents as the DARK (Deny Americans the Right to Know) Act, preempts Vermont’s mandatory GMO labeling law and substitutes in its place a federal bill that, no matter how Obama and his Congress try to spin it, is not mandatory and does not require labels—at least not labels that anyone can read. I could, once again, list all the reasons this bill fails consumers. But I and others have already done that countless times, to no avail. The bill is a sham, a slap in the face to the 90 percent of Americans who support labeling. It’s an attack on states’ rights. It’s another “gift” to Monsanto and Big Food. And, for anyone who still harbored any doubt, S.764 is proof that our Democracy is broken, that our lawmakers answer to Corporate America, not to us, the people who elect them. It would be easy, after four-and-a-half years of non-stop fighting for labels, to cave in to despair. But let’s not give Monsanto the satisfaction. Instead, let’s take a page out of Gandhi’s playbook. Let’s launch a boycott that will go down in history.
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WAIT! It’s Not a Weed! It’s One of the Most Unrecognized Health Boosting Plants! Purslane!

Often called pig weed (and it certainly would be better for your pigs than some of the GMO grain many farmers have been using to feed their livestock), Purslane has more beneficial Omega 3 fatty acids than many fish oils! The weed also has one of the highest levels of vitamin A among all leafy green vegetables (1320 IU/100 g, provides 44% of RDA). High Vitamin A foods can help protect us from many types of cancers and helps to boost eye health.


Via Ingrid Long, Eric Larson
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16 Vegan One-Pot Recipes If You Are Considering Cutting Animals Out Of Your Diet

16 Vegan One-Pot Recipes If You Are Considering Cutting Animals Out Of Your Diet | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it

16 one pot vegan dishes


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Eric Larson's curator insight, August 16, 9:41 AM
Important vegan recipes.
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The Japanese Government Officially Lists THIS Ancient Medicinal Mushroom as a Cancer Treatment!

The Japanese Government Officially Lists THIS Ancient Medicinal Mushroom as a Cancer Treatment! | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it
Mushrooms aren’t everybody’s cup of tea, but there’s certainly an abundance of them in nature. Over 10,00 species of mushrooms are known to man, and all but 50-100 of them are edible.

Certain varieties are prized for their abilities, like Tochukasu, which increases ATP production, boosts endurance and strength, and fights aging and Cordyceps, which are used to fight respiratory disorders and improve liver function (5,6).

Via Poppen Report, Eric Larson
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Eric Larson's curator insight, August 16, 7:44 PM
Mushrooms help with cancer.
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Recipe: Tropical THC Muffins | The Marijuana Times

Recipe: Tropical THC Muffins | The Marijuana Times | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it
These coconut muffins are a dense but moist delight that use the wonderful power of mango to amplify the effects of THC and help it traverse the blood-brain

Via Daniel Gonzales
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Strawberry Shortcake Ice Cream Vegetarian Recipe

Strawberry Shortcake Ice Cream Vegetarian Recipe | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it
Find out how to make delicious Strawberry Shortcake Ice Cream with this vegetarian recipe from Veggie Magazine
Via Neelima Sinha, anisio luiz nogueira
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Why Are There Still So Many Hungry People in the World? | Hilal Elver

Why Are There Still So Many Hungry People in the World? | Hilal Elver | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it
The world produces enough food to feed 10 billion people. Poverty and hunger prevail because of economics, not scarcity

Via Andy Dorn, Giannis Tompros
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Chana Masala | Taste Chronicles

Chana Masala | Taste Chronicles | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it
A big pot of chole or chana masala was customary in any late 80s - early 90's birthday party in my memory. An Indian vegetarian staple, chole is inexpensive, hearty, healthy and generally well liked by children and adults alike. Apart from my dad - he does NOT like chole! It is a bit of a running joke between us. We FaceTime quite often just around my dinner time. If I am having chole, I will tell him I am having "his favorite!" Then of course he has to guess which one of his 'favorites' it is - bhindi (okra), rajma (red kidney beans) or chole (chickpeas)! 
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Research Newsletter | Linus Pauling Institute | Oregon State University

Research Newsletter | Linus Pauling Institute | Oregon State University | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it
Free subscription!
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Fresh Peach Salsa Recipe

Fresh Peach Salsa Recipe | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it
Fresh Peach Salsa Recipe Condiments and Sauces with peaches, diced tomatoes, diced red onions, chopped cilantro, jalapeno chilies, lemon juice, sugar
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Dr. Mercola's Updated Nutrition Plan: Your Guide to Optimal Health

Dr. Mercola's Updated Nutrition Plan: Your Guide to Optimal Health | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it
"Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food." As with most foundational truths, this saying by Hippocrates is as applicable today as it ever was. I've been passionate about using food and nutrition to optimize my own health for over 50 years.

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More Coca-Cola Ties Seen Inside U.S. Centers for Disease Control

More Coca-Cola Ties Seen Inside U.S. Centers for Disease Control | Food Security, Health, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation | Scoop.it
A high-ranking official within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, unexpectedly departs after information came to light indicating that there had been regular communication with a leading Coca-Cola advocate seeking to influence world health authorities on sugar and beverage policy matters.
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Train Hard, Play Hard, Refuel Intelligently

“What should I eat post-workout?”

I receive this question quite often during my daily client training. A considerable amount of advertising money seems to be devoted to on-the-go sports drinks, shakes and protein bars these days, and it is little wonder that clients become overwhelmed in the miasma of the decision-making process.

Being familiar with many of my clients' personal lives and schedules, I try to answer in the simplest manner possible. If a client is a recreational exerciser who trains two or three times a week, for 30 to 60 minutes, chances are his body does not become depleted during fitness workouts. In addition, there is ample time to refuel between trips to the gym.

However, many trainers work with competitive swimmers who will be participating in multiple events in the same day. Triathlete clients, who engage in two-a-day workouts, or soccer players working towards a weekend-long tournament, typically meet with a personal trainer more often as their big day approaches. For these athletes, who need to rapidly recover from one intense exercise performance bout in preparation for the next one, the recovery diet deserves to be in as excellent shape as their bodies.

Planning a recovery diet, and having the right foods and fluids readily available, is the key to being able to easily and adequately replace calories, carbohydrates, protein, fluids and sodium lost during serious training. With this in place, along with correct planning of the workload and the recovery time, the marvels of adaptation allow the body to become fitter, stronger and faster over time. A proactive recovery means providing the body with all the nutrients it needs, in a speedy and practical manner, to optimize the desired processes following each session. If the important elements of a recovery meal are readily available, the body is more inclined to utilize them in an efficient manner. By providing these nutrients, an athlete can signal his body that post-exercise is the perfect time to rebuild.

We improve recovery nutrition availability in two ways:

Increased blood flow to skeletal muscle during and after exercise means that more nutrients are floating around more quickly. Providing an amino acid and glucose dense blood supply during and after exercise means that the rate of protein synthesis increases.

Post-exercise nutrition has evolved into a science; yet there is by no means a one-size-fits-all solution. The optimal amount of macronutrients, as well as the ratio of these nutrients, can vary greatly for each athlete. Whether you are armed with a degree in competitive sports nutrition, or have done a tremendous amount of research on the topic, your recommendations may want to be based upon the client's age, gender, body size, physical condition, duration and type of events in which he will be participating, and environmental factors such as temperature and altitude (very important considerations for outdoor athletes). In addition to these parameters, consider the following:

How much fuel was utilized during training? What was the approximate extent of muscle damage and sweat loss incurred while exercising? Was a stimulus presented to increase utilization of muscle protein?

An easy way for clients to fully realize what is happening at a cellular level during recovery is by encouraging them to think in terms of the 3 R's:

Refuel Rebuild Rehydrate

Each of these critical recovery concepts calls for a different combination of fluids, electrolytes, carbohydrates, and protein-each playing a specific role in the process.

Although not a cookie-cutter determination, a few general guidelines for clients of this caliber might be:

15-60 minutes
The amount of time following training or competition during which he should commence his recovery nutrition routine 2:1
The minimal carbohydrate to protein ratio desirable to consume after activity, in order to jump-start recovery. Depending upon the nature of the activity, its intensity and its duration, I have seen references that support ingesting anywhere from a 2:1 to 4:1 ratio. Experimentation over time will end up dictating what works best for each client.

Recovery encompasses a complex range of processes, aside from simple muscular adaptation:

Refuels the muscle and liver glycogen stores Replaces the fluid and electrolytes lost via sweat Manufactures new muscle protein, red blood cells and other cellular components as part of the repair and adaptation process Allows the immune system to handle the damage and challenges brought about by the training session or participation in the competitive event.

Muscle glycogen is the main fuel utilized by the body during moderate and high intensity exercise.  Inability to adequately replace glycogen stores through carbohydrate consumption will lead to compromised performance in subsequent sessions. Therefore, the major dietary consideration when planning post-exercise refueling is the amount of carbohydrate ingested.  Depending upon the fuel cost of the training schedule, or the need to fuel in the time leading up to race, a serious athlete may need to consume a slight excess of carbohydrates per kg body weight each day to ensure adequate glycogen stores. The type and form of carbohydrate that is most suitable will depend upon a number of factors:

The athlete's overall daily carbohydrate and energy requirements Gastric tolerance, access and availability of suitable food options The length of time before the next training session

In general, within the immediate post- exercise period (ideally the first hour), athletes are encouraged to consume a carbohydrate -rich snack or meal that provides at least 1-1.2 g of carbohydrate per kg body weight. During this time frame, the rate of glycogen synthesis is greatest. The importance of this becomes highlighted when the time between prolonged training sessions or performance events is less than 8 hours.

Another inquiry I often receive from clients is the best choice of carbohydrates to facilitate his goals. Research has demonstrated that the following whole foods (not supplements) tend to produce optimal results:

Sweet potatoes Oats Wild rice Bananas Chickpeas

Consuming some protein along with the carbs stimulates faster glycogen replacement. The protein optimizes muscular growth, since it is the nutrient that drives the body to repair damaged muscle tissue. Protein is also desirable in the recovery time following training sessions or competitive events, as it will facilitate the synthesis of muscle protein, a key process for building muscle. Consuming protein along with carbohydrates during recovery from endurance exercise appears to afford the body its best chances for recovery. As the glycogen is being replaced with the carbs, the lean protein source provides the body with amino acids (building blocks of protein) on signaling pathways that control muscle protein synthesis. I like to utilize the metaphor of a shuttle system when I explain this to clients. The protein gets shuttled into the bloodstream to do its important work, with the carbohydrates serving as the rocket.

The amount of protein required for the post-workout period is often overestimated, again as a result of media hype from supplement providers. More protein in a recovery nutrition meal does not always equal increased muscle building. The average body is unable to digest, and therefore not able to utilize, much more than 20-40 grams of high quality lean protein at any given time. Excess consumption, sadly, often gets stored in the body as adipose tissue. In addition, it is important to switch up protein choices on a regular basis, in order to reduce the chances of developing of any potential food intolerance/allergy.

During the recovery phase, the athlete's body experiences a reduction in catabolic (breakdown) processes and a gradual increase in anabolic (building) processes, which continues for at least 24 hours after exercise. Recent research has shown that early intake of essential amino acids from good quality protein helps to promote the increase in lean muscle mass rebuilding.  Ongoing studies are still addressing the optimal type of protein (casein, whey, or vegan sources such as pea and hemp) to ingest during this window of opportunity. To a large extent, this choice depends upon an individual's tolerance, allergies, and scheduling for the remainder of the day. Consuming complete sources of protein in meals and snacks after this time frame will promote further protein synthesis, although not at the same voracious rate as is exhibited during that first critical hour.

The most recent evidence points to carbohydrates as one of the most promising nutritional immune protectors.  Ensuring adequate carbohydrate stores before exercise, and consuming carbohydrate during and/or after a prolonged or high-intensity workout, have both been shown to reduce the disturbance to immune system markers in the body.  The carbohydrate seems to reduce the stress hormone's response to exercise, thus minimizing its effect on the immune system, as well as supplying glucose to fuel the activity of the myriad of white cells within the immune system.

If your client indicates that he has trouble tolerating solid food after vigorous training, he may have to resort to experimenting with liquid recovery foods. A surprisingly easy and convenient choice is chocolate milk, which has often been suggested as an ideal option during recovery since it very simply combines carbohydrates and protein. The International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism reported that athletes who drank chocolate milk after an intense bout of exercise were able to work out longer and with more power during a second workout as compared to athletes who consumed commercially prepared sports drinks.

“Our study indicates that chocolate milk is a strong alternative to other commercial sports drinks in helping athletes recover from strenuous, energy-depleting exercise,” says Joel M. Stager, Ph.D., Professor of Kinesiology at Indiana University. “Chocolate milk contains an optimal carbohydrate to protein ratio, which is critical for helping refuel tired muscles after strenuous exercise and can enable athletes to exercise at a high intensity during subsequent workouts.”

Another recent study, this one published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, concluded that cereal and non-fat milk is as good as a commercially-available sports drink in initiating post-exercise muscle recovery.

While this does in fact seem like an ideal solution to the quick and easy recovery meal conundrum, there is an interesting point to consider on the topic of chocolate milk: Intense exercise tends to create an acidic environment throughout the body.  Animal protein (as is found in dairy products) is acid forming. If the acid is not properly neutralized during the refueling meal, the body may compensate by pulling the necessary calcium from skeletal bones and nitrogen from muscle tissue. Greens, sprouted vegetables, and certain fruits will have a neutralizing effect on the body, and make great food options to enjoy along with the chocolate milk.

Greek yogurt has double the amount of protein than that found in most regular yogurts, and is a great source of carbohydrates. “Mix it with cereal or fruit,” recommends Dr. Louise Burke, Head of Sports Nutrition at the Australian Institute of Sport and coauthor of The Complete Guide to Food for Sports Performance: Peak Nutrition for Your Sport. Fresh berries pack micronutrients that have been proven to help fight muscle soreness. Pineapple is also known to have anti-inflammatory properties to further aid in muscle recovery. Kiwis help facilitate digestion and provide necessary dietary fiber. Try experimenting with fruit that offers anti-oxidants as well as a neutralizing effect, and stir into a cup of yogurt.

The benefits of post-exercise nutrition, regardless of gender, include:

Improved recovery Less muscle soreness Increased ability to build muscle Improved immune function Improved bone mass Improved ability to utilize body fat

Repair and rebuilding occurs through the breakdown of old, damaged proteins and the construction of new ones - a process known collectively as protein turnover. Muscle protein synthesis is increased slightly (or remains unchanged) after resistance workouts, while protein breakdown increases dramatically. During this time frame, it seems that the body is doing much more breaking-down than building-up. The relationship between these two parameters represents the metabolic basis for muscle growth. Muscle hypertrophy occurs when a positive protein balance can be established during recovery - in other words, when we make sure we have enough raw materials available for protein synthesis to occur, so that it doesn't lag behind protein breakdown. Studies show that this trend can be reversed. Specifically, protein synthesis may actually be stimulated and protein breakdown suppressed when the right type of nutrients are consumed after exercise.

With so many positive reasons to pay close attention to the post-exercise meal, you will be providing a valuable service to your clients by being able to answer their questions about timely and high-quality recovery nutrition.

REFERENCES:

http://www.active.com/nutrition/articles/recovery-nutrition-guidelines-after-hard-exercise http://www.ausport.gov.au/ais/nutrition/factsheets/competition_and_training/recovery_nutrition http://www.coreperformance.com/knowledge/nutrition/recovery-nutrition.html http://www.nomeatathlete.com/post-workout-recovery/ http://www.mensfitness.com/nutrition/what-to-eat/best-post-workout-foods http://static.abbottnutrition.com/cms-prod/anhi.org/img/8-110th%20AN%20Conf%20Phillips%20Final-110th%20Abbott%20Nutrition%20Research%20Conference.pdf http://www.precisionnutrition.com/about-post-workout-nutrition

The post Train Hard, Play Hard, Refuel Intelligently appeared first on The NFPT Blog.


Via Tony Lala, Emily Scott
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