Recording
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(EN) – Recording Studios Glossary | Dan McAvinchey

(EN) – Recording Studios Glossary | Dan McAvinchey | Recording | Scoop.it

"Understanding many of the hundreds of terms used in a recording studio by producers, engineers, composers, and musicians can be an overwhelming task. We hope to help eliminate the confusion by compiling an on-line glossary that will attempt to define commonly used buzzwords and jargon, both subjective (“I need a warm, weighty, yet puffy bass sound here…”) and straight-forward (“Did you join ASCAP yet…”). Using the glossary will not make you an expert overnight, but it will help keep you in the know and keep you abreast of all the specialized terminology that seems to ..."


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Kelvin Omila's curator insight, November 4, 2013 4:39 PM

McAvinchey, has posted this great glossary of words in music; in here, you can find terms, even to a "seasoned" recording engineer might not now.

Words like  "warm", "acoustic-feel", or  what is an "accent microphone" this is a great article with resources I can use to refer back to, just incase I want to keep a knowledgable look as a recording engineer.

 

Justin Foley's curator insight, November 8, 2013 3:31 PM

This is a great source for anyone new to studios. It will help them learn some of the terms that are used in Recording Studios.

Peter Bunyaratavej's curator insight, September 13, 2015 4:15 PM

Having a career in the studio I would imagine would be very overwhelming. Learning different terms as well as the signal flow of different consoles is extremely difficult when your learning the studio for the first time. After all of learning experience you start to have an appreciation of the recording process as well as the console. You soon learn that every studio in the world has different sounds because of the different shapes and material they use. After acknowledging that you appreciate the studio you work in because it always one of a kind.    

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Recording Drums Tutorial

Recording Drums Tutorial | Recording | Scoop.it
Achieving a well-balanced drum recording is something that every engineer aspires to – but how exactly is it done? John Pickford shares the knowledge.
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Vincent Indiano's curator insight, September 14, 2014 9:47 AM

The biggest reason why I like this article is that he talks about how a drummer must be prepared even before coming into the studio. The drummer must know what drums or symbols he needs compared to what he only has for looks. There is no point in putting a microphone somewhere were it wont be used. This article has a lot of valuable points and tips.

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Audio Solution Spotlight: MixRoom Monitoring Environment by Carl Tatz - SonicScoop

Audio Solution Spotlight: MixRoom Monitoring Environment by Carl Tatz - SonicScoop | Recording | Scoop.it
SonicScoop Audio Solution Spotlight: MixRoom Monitoring Environment by Carl Tatz SonicScoop The final component is Tatz himself, who personally calculates, designs and tunes each room with the experience he's gained from decades of creating studios...
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Music piracy on the decline as digital music sales grow | Wash Post

Music piracy on the decline as digital music sales grow | Wash Post | Recording | Scoop.it

Maybe music executives can finally stop singing the blues. Music piracy is on the decline, analysts say, while an industry group said digital music sales in 2012 drove global music industry revenues up for the first time since 1999.

 

It’s not a very big gain for the music industry — just 0.3 percent to $16.5 billion — but even that small uptick may be a sign that digital music has finally put the industry on the path to recovery. Digital music and services, the report said, grew 9 percent in the past year. That comprises digital downloads, as well as newer subscription services such as Spotify and ad-supported services including Pandora.

 

“No doubt, this is welcome news,” said Recording Industry Association of America spokesman Jonathan Lamy, who said over half of the industry’s revenues come from digital services now. “We are starting to turn the corner, and that’s great news for the business and fans.”

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Charles Bohart's curator insight, January 17, 9:26 PM

In today's age, where the majority of my friends are pirating music the majority of the time, having a decline in piracy i welcome. Hopefully this minor uptick in legal digital downloads will snowball in the coming years and eradicate this problem.

JustTheBeginning's curator insight, February 9, 10:08 PM

We're seeing times change not just over night but rapidly faster than usual with just about every big name company becoming a contender in the sweepstakes to providing the best music streaming services at the most convenient rate you gotta expect to see things get into tip top shape. Apps like Spotify, Apple Music, & etc are all in the ranks of running circles around the industry as a whole.

George Slight's curator insight, February 10, 11:11 PM

This great news for the professional who is worried about sales. Until today I thought that music piracy was at an all time high, I'm glad to hear this news to prove me wrong and that the music field is thriving.

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Recording industry threatens YouTube and other music services ...

Recording industry threatens YouTube and other music services ... | Recording | Scoop.it
In a case between Universal Music Group and the music streaming service Grooveshark, the court ruled that the DMCA-granted protections do not cover sound recordings that were made before 1972, which as the court ...
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Voice-over Vs. Radio Work, Part 2

Voice-over Vs. Radio Work, Part 2 | Recording | Scoop.it

Professional voice-overs have only recently had to ponder the question, “What’s your rate?”  Historically that’s a question a talent agent answers, not the talent. Yet in radio circles, where they are familiar with writing, voicing and producing hundreds a ‘promo spots’ a week for local station vendors, professional recording engineers...


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Joechel's comment, August 13, 2013 9:44 PM
Pros- I think when using voice overs you lose the ability of determining whether or not the artist has the ability to actually sing or hit certain ranges. And you lose the ability to hear the actual voice of the artist.
Joechel's comment, August 13, 2013 9:47 PM
Cons- The voice over effect actually brings a different type of feel to a track and gives it a different feeling that the voice itself could never.