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Embodied Cognition’s Philosophical Roots

Embodied Cognition’s Philosophical Roots | Reciprocal causation pedagogy | Scoop.it

Current theories about “embodied cognition” – the notion that our minds are in some sense determined by our bodies – stand to revolutionize the way we think about who, and what, we are. But the philosophical roots of embodied cognition teach us that our minds might not be the abstract things we always thought they were.

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Reciprocal causation pedagogy
“We become what we behold. We shape our tools and then our tools shape us”<br>(Culkin, 1967)  - should we embed reciprocal causation in our teaching? Does this serve our human purposes?
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Beyond the Machine: Metaphors of the body

Beyond the Machine: Metaphors of the body | Reciprocal causation pedagogy | Scoop.it
Biologist and author of The Science Delusion Rupert Sheldrake, Oxford neuroscientist Colin Blakemore, and award-winning novelist Joanna Kavenna reimagine the human being.
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In a new world of informational abundance, content curation is a new kind of authorship

In a new world of informational abundance, content curation is a new kind of authorship | Reciprocal causation pedagogy | Scoop.it
Editor's Note: Maria Popova is the editor of Brain Pickings, a curation of "cross-disciplinary interestingness" that scours the world of the web and beyond for share-worthy tidbits. Here, she considers how new approaches to curation are changing the way we consume and share information.
Mariana Funes's insight:

She suggest that curation is a creative endevour that should be credited. The tool shapes the difinition of what it means to be an author?

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The Man Who Would Teach Machines to Think

The Man Who Would Teach Machines to Think | Reciprocal causation pedagogy | Scoop.it
Douglas Hofstadter, the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Gödel, Escher, Bach, thinks we've lost sight of what artificial intelligence really means. His stubborn quest to replicate the human mind.
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Moving the Statue - valuing learning through our physical rituals

Moving the Statue - valuing learning through our physical rituals | Reciprocal causation pedagogy | Scoop.it

With the click of a button, a student can move from Facebook, Netflix, or worse, pornography, to my English 101 course.  How can such a casual juxtaposition not subtly devalue education?  Lacking all locomotion, there is no physical reinforcement of change, and there is no demonstrative spatial indicators that states “learning is afoot.”  Instead, the student is surrounded (most often literally) by all of the comforts of home, and although that picture of grandma and those footie pajamas may feel good, research supports the notion that we often learn best when we are on the edge or even slightly outside our comfort zone.

Mariana Funes's insight:

A really interesting blog post about the often neglected issue of creating the right environment for learning and how the virtual may not encourage the best learning. Reminded me of this article:

 

"As students enter a virtual or brick-and-mortar learning environment, they form a cognitive impression of that space and experience an associated emotional response, just as Harry Potter did when he entered his Divination classroom. People's preference for specific environments appears to depend on their cognitive impression. Kaplan and Kaplan22 suggested four cognitive determinants of environmental preference:

- Coherence, or the ease with which a setting can be organized cognitively
- Complexity, or the perceived capacity of the setting to occupy interest and stimulate activity
- Legibility, or perceived ease of use
- Mystery, or the perception that entering the setting would lead to increased learning, interaction, or interest

An interesting addition to this list might be the concept of enchantment. Bennett described enchantment as the experience of being "both caught up and carried away." When enchanted by what we are experiencing, we are held spellbound, our senses seem heightened,and we are caught in a moment of pure presence that we try to maintain."

 

Read full article on:
http://www.educause.edu/research-and-publications/books/learning-spaces/chapter-6-psychology-learning-environments

I love the notion of designing enchantment into our learning environments. And oh so hard to control what students do around their computers.

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Hatnote Listen to Wikipedia

Hatnote Listen to Wikipedia | Reciprocal causation pedagogy | Scoop.it
Listen to recent changes on Wikipedia
Mariana Funes's insight:

Just click and enjoy!

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The Internet of Things should work like the Internet

The Internet of Things should work like the Internet | Reciprocal causation pedagogy | Scoop.it

At our OSCON conference this summer, Jon Bruner, Renee DiResta and I sat down withAlasdair Allan, a hardware hacker and O’Reilly author; Josh Marinacci, a researcher with Nokia; and Tony Santos, a user experience designer with Mozilla. Our discussion focused on the future of UI/UX design, from the perils of designing from the top down to declining diversity in washing machines to controlling your car from anywhere in the world.

Mariana Funes's insight:

Interesting podcast about the future of the internet of things - how to design for ease of use and invisibility in a world that is trying to make money from closed and proprietory systems. 

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Embodied Cognition’s Philosophical Roots

Embodied Cognition’s Philosophical Roots | Reciprocal causation pedagogy | Scoop.it

Current theories about “embodied cognition” – the notion that our minds are in some sense determined by our bodies – stand to revolutionize the way we think about who, and what, we are. But the philosophical roots of embodied cognition teach us that our minds might not be the abstract things we always thought they were.

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True stories of openness

True stories of openness | Reciprocal causation pedagogy | Scoop.it

"While the Open Education movement focuses on institutional issues and often the sharing of “things” (content, resources), a large ocean exists of powerful individual accomplishments from the simple act of openly sharing what they create, their ideas, or just themselves"

Mariana Funes's insight:

And this is where the distributed intelligence lives, not in the OER's or the other artefacts we create. The tools change how we think and help us think differently - the socioemotive element is the large ocean that carries our intentions as we use the tools. Be it pen and paper or a computer.

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We, Our Digital Selves, and Us

"Created by Alan Levine @cogdog http://cogdogblog.com"


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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A few words on Doug Engelbart

A few words on Doug Engelbart | Reciprocal causation pedagogy | Scoop.it

Engelbart had an intent, a goal, a mission. He stated it clearly and in depth. He intended to augment human intellect. He intended to boost collective intelligence and enable knowledge workers to think in powerful new ways, to collectively solve urgent global problems. Engelbart's vision, from the beginning, was collaborative. His vision was people working together in a shared intellectual space.

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Why we will rely on robots

Scaremongers play on the idea that robots will simply replace people on the job. In fact, they can become our essential collaborators, freeing us up to spend time on less mundane and mechanical challenges.
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Why Google Glass?

It's not a demo, more of a philosophical argument: Why did Sergey Brin and his team at Google want to build an eye-mounted camera/computer, codenamed Glass?
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The kill decision shouldn't belong to a robot

"Now, lethally autonomous killer robots would take many forms -- flying, driving, or just lying in wait. And actually, they're very quickly becoming a reality. These are two automatic sniper stations currently deployed in the DMZ between North and South Korea. Both of these machines are capable of automatically identifying a human target and firing on it, the one on the left at a distance of over a kilometer. Now, in both cases, there's still a human in the loop to make that lethal firing decision, but it's not a technological requirement. It's a choice."

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Thoughts on “Collective Intelligence”

Thoughts on “Collective Intelligence” | Reciprocal causation pedagogy | Scoop.it
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New Techniques from Google and Ray Kurzweil Are Taking Artificial Intelligence to Another Level

New Techniques from Google and Ray Kurzweil Are Taking Artificial Intelligence to Another Level | Reciprocal causation pedagogy | Scoop.it
With massive amounts of computational power, machines can now recognize objects and translate speech in real time. Artificial intelligence is finally getting smart.
Mariana Funes's insight:

Deep learning techniques to what end?

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Lakoff on Embodied Cognition and Language

Lakoff on Embodied Cognition and Language | Reciprocal causation pedagogy | Scoop.it
I just came across this interesting and recent lecture by George Lakoff (UC Berkeley) entitled: Cascade Theory: Embodied Cognition and Language from a Neural Perspective . Lakoff is known for his...
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Ergonomics in the Digital Age

Ergonomics in the Digital Age | Reciprocal causation pedagogy | Scoop.it

The “aha” moment in Steelcase’s investigation of workplace postures came when the researchers included smart devices and laptops in the study. The nine postures (left) and key movement zones (far left) they identified influenced the design of the Gesture chair, launched earlier this year. In this age of ubiquitous computing, what exactly are we doing to our bodies?

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Dr. Oblivion defines the New Flesh

The screen is the retina of the mind...

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A Brief Guide to Embodied Cognition

A Brief Guide to Embodied Cognition | Reciprocal causation pedagogy | Scoop.it

Embodied cognition, the idea that the mind is not only connected to the body but that the body influences the mind, is one of the more counter-intuitive ideas in cognitive science.

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The Hut Where the Internet Began

The Hut Where the Internet Began | Reciprocal causation pedagogy | Scoop.it
When Douglas Engelbart read a Vannevar Bush essay on a Philippine island in the aftermath of World War II, he found the conceptual space to imagine what would become our Internet.

 

"Instead, he developed a framework for helping human minds to come together to improve themselves. He did not think the machines could or should do the thinking for us. Markoff, a long-time chronicler of computing, sees Engelbart as one pole in a decades-long competition "between artificial intelligence and intelligence augmentation -- A.I. versus I.A." That's because Engelbart's view of computing development retained a privileged place for humans"

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Does every society have a self?

"Cross-cultural variation in self and self perception"

Mariana Funes's insight:

No. And if we look at the 'Breakdown of the bicameral mind' book historically we have not always 'had' a self...and in buddhism we do not 'have' a self or anything else. The fragmented identitiy of our digital selves may be closer to life outside the matrix than we would like to believe.

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On Stephen Hawking, Vader and Being More Machine Than Human

On Stephen Hawking, Vader and Being More Machine Than Human | Reciprocal causation pedagogy | Scoop.it

Because, surrounded as we are by our world of technology and digital information, aren’t we alldisabled? We, like Hawking, like Obama and his brain trust, are unable to think and complete the results of our thoughts without being attached to a network of people, instruments, machines – and the living laboratories through which it is all distributed.

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An introduction to Activity Theory (Part 1)

Cultural-historical activity theory, or CHAT, with its roots in Soviet psychology, and Marx and Engels, has emerged as a significant phenomenon in the last few decades.…
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Automated Conversation coach

Automated Conversation coach | Reciprocal causation pedagogy | Scoop.it

"MACH, My Automated Conversation coacH, is a system for people to practice social interactions in face-to-face scenarios. MACH consists of a 3D character that can see, hear, and make its own decisions in real time.

The system was validated in the context of job interviews with 90 MIT undergraduate students. Students who interacted with MACH demonstrated significant performance improvement compared to the students in the control group. We are currently expanding this technology to open up new possibilities in behavioral health (e.g., treating people with Asperger syndrome, social phobia, PTSD) as well as designing new interaction paradigms in human-computer interaction and robotics."

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How the brain controls a machine

How the brain controls a machine | Reciprocal causation pedagogy | Scoop.it

"Activity observed in the brain when using a "mind machine" is similar to how the brain learns new motor skills, scientists have found."

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