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Remote surgery via Google Glass and VIPAAR (Virtual Interactive Presence in Augmented Reality) | ISPR.info

Remote surgery via Google Glass and VIPAAR (Virtual Interactive Presence in Augmented Reality) | ISPR.info | Réalité virtuelle | Scoop.it

A University of Alabama at Birmingham surgical team has performed one of the first surgeries using a virtual augmented reality technology from VIPAAR in conjunction with Google Glass, a wearable computer with an optical head-mounted display. The combination of the two technologies could be an important step toward the development of useful, practical telemedicine.

 

VIPAAR, which stands for Virtual Interactive Presence in Augmented Reality, is commercializing a UAB-developed technology that provides real-time, two-way, interactive video conferencing.

 

UAB orthopedic surgeon Brent Ponce, M.D., performed a shoulder replacement surgery Sept. 12 at UAB Highlands Hospital in Birmingham. Watching and interacting with Ponce via the VIPAAR technology was Phani Dantuluri, M.D., from his office in Atlanta.

 

Ponce wore Google Glass during the operation. The built-in camera transmitted the image of the surgical field to Dantuluri. The VIPAAR technology allowed Dantuluri to see exactly what Ponce saw in the operating room and introduce his hands or instruments into the virtual surgical field. At the same time, Ponce saw Dantuluri’s hands and instruments in his heads-up display, along with his own field of view, as a merged-reality environment.

 

“It’s not unlike the line marking a first down that a television broadcast adds to the screen while televising a football game,” said Ponce. “You see the line, although it’s not really on the field. Using VIPAAR, a remote surgeon is able to put his or her hands into the surgical field and provide collaboration and assistance.”

 

The two surgeons were able to discuss the case in a truly interactive fashion since Dantuluri could watch Ponce perform the surgery and simultaneously introduce his hands or instruments into Ponce’s view as if they were standing next to each other during the case.

 

“It’s real-time, real-life, right there, as opposed to a Skype or video conference call, which allows for dialogue back and forth but is not really interactive,” said Ponce.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Bringing VR to Life - Gamasutra (blog)

Bringing VR to Life - Gamasutra (blog) | Réalité virtuelle | Scoop.it
Bringing VR to Life
Gamasutra (blog)
Today, cell phone technology is driving down the cost of all computing elements required for a compelling VR experience. The dawn of virtual reality is finally here.

Via Sandys VR
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Sandys VR's curator insight, January 22, 2014 2:07 PM

He has some really nice tipps and explains the basic concepts in a way easy to understand for everything. Worth reading!

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Teki system lets patients visit the doctor via Kinect | GizMag.com

Teki system lets patients visit the doctor via Kinect | GizMag.com | Réalité virtuelle | Scoop.it

Like many other parts of the world, Spain's Basque Country is currently faced with an increasing population of senior citizens placing strain upon the limited resources of the health care system. That's why the Teki project was instituted. It allows patients with chronic conditions to quickly check in with their doctors via an internet-connected Microsoft Kinect unit, thus reducing the number of time-consuming office visits, and catching problems before they require hospitalization.

 

Teki was developed by technology services company Accenture, along with partners including Microsoft.

 

Users receive a Kinect box that is hooked up to their TV and internet, along with a wireless heart rate monitor that measures the pulse via the finger, and a spirometer for measuring respiratory levels.

 

On a regular basis, via an interface on the TV screen, patients communicate with their doctor using video conferencing, voice communications, or text messaging. At that time, the doctor can check their vitals, inquire about their symptoms, and answer any questions.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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NASA controls robots with Kinect and Oculus Rift - GameSpot

NASA controls robots with Kinect and Oculus Rift - GameSpot | Réalité virtuelle | Scoop.it
GameSpot
NASA controls robots with Kinect and Oculus Rift
GameSpot
Kinect and Oculus Rift aren't just for games.
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