Real Way for De...
Follow
Find
430 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Tablet PC and monopolized markets
onto Real Way for Development
Scoop.it!

5 (less traditional) ways to create and share knowledge online

5 (less traditional) ways to create and share knowledge online | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

The communication of knowledge and ideas is intrinsic to the human condition. Our earliest ancestors had a rich oral tradition, through which they passed on what they knew about the world, often across great distances.

 

Today, the avenues available to our quest to gain and share knowledge are boundless, but I’d like to share with you five of my own personal favorites.


Via Guillaume Decugis, Sergey Ruseev
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

Knowledge  online  for  realization  new  knowledge.

more...
Andrea Norwood's comment, June 24, 2013 11:00 AM
I love it when others share information with me, whether it be business, political, in which I am not all that much into, but it still helps to know what's happening in the world of politics, or whether it be history of old or new, knowledge is the key to life and especially education.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.
Scoop.it!

Is Leadership Irrelevant? - Forbes

Is Leadership Irrelevant? - Forbes | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
Leaders today find the world changing around them faster than they can keep up.

Via ValerieMalaval, Riaz Khan
more...
Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from The Funnily Enough
Scoop.it!

Characteristics of Highly Creative People

Characteristics of Highly Creative People | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

There are a surprising number of blog posts about the characteristics of creative people. However, most of these seem to focus either on an idealized vision of an artist or the blog-writer’s idealized self-image! Here is my take on the characteristics of highly creative people. However, what I have done is looked at how creative people think -- based on my understanding of the latest research -- and applied it to behavior.

 

It is also worth bearing in mind that creativity is not all positive. There are good and bad creative people. Moreover, there seem to be some characteristics of creative people, such as dishonesty, that are not very nice. More controversially, some research has shown a correlation between creativity and mental illness. (The validity of this is contested, though.)

 


Via mooderino
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

Creative People Are Introverts, Extroverts, Collaborators, Independent, Big, Small, Fat, Skinny... - */S.Y\ Creative Reflection determine your Capacity for Rethinking with New Mindset .

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Real Way for Development
Scoop.it!

Medium

Medium | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

Click here to edit the content...


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Sergey Yatsenko
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

New  media Symbiosis. This  is  the Positive Effect  of  Interaction  in   Social Media / Facebook, Twitter, Scoop.it, LinkedIn, About me, SladeShare, Viadeo, .../.                 

more...
Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, December 11, 2012 2:30 AM

Lots of services have successfully lowered the bar for sharing information, but there’s been less progress toward raising the quality of what’s produced. It’s great that you can be a one-person media outlet, but it’d be even better if there were more ways you could work with others. And in a world of increasingly overwhelming quantities of content, how do we direct our attention to what’s most valuable, not just what’s interesting and of-the-moment?

Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Review of Knowledge Management
Scoop.it!

The End of Knowledge Management is Already Here

Despite what people think, the end state of knowledge management is already here. All future things are uncertain and that is not going to change no matter how much information, or how many artifacts, you have at hand. Entropy dictates that the problems of uncertainty multiply with the increase of information or artifacts. Topic: Information Management.

Via Development Policy , BroadaInfo
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

Reset your goalposts. Rather than seeking certainty via masses of information and artifacts, look to deliver a refined perspective and insight. - */S.Y\ A Permanent Creativity is the Best Quality for Leader with New Opportunities for Business.

more...
BroadaInfo's curator insight, March 26, 9:19 PM

An interesting post to ponder on the future of knowledge management. 

Yoke Wong's curator insight, April 15, 11:06 PM

Some confusions in the article on the subject KM. Beto do Valle's insights at the end have clarified the understandings and are definitely worth noting. He wrote, "knowledge management" still needs to find better ways to make more value out of knowledge sharing, flow, application and innovation". 

Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Technology
Scoop.it!

Ambient Connectivity and the Internet of Things | TechnoMetria

Ambient Connectivity and the Internet of Things | TechnoMetria | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

A while back, I heard someone say "the Internet of Things will happen once we have IPv6." While I understand the sentiment, we need to get away from NAT'd devices, IPv6 is not, by itself, sufficient to make the Internet of Things take off.

 

We could talk about a lot of missing pieces, but Bob Frankston is talking about one that seems very fundamental: connectivity.

 

Bob's article makes an interesting point: we assume that we connectivity is something we buy from an ISP or the phone company, but there's nothing that says that has to be so.

 

"In a sense the Internet is similar to other transitions. Railroads were transformative because they enabled commerce over a distance but, over time, became captive to the accidental properties of the rails and rolling stock and the attendant business models. We are able to "conquer distance" using facilities such as roads and sidewalks. Such facilities differ from railroads in that value accrues to society as a whole rather than having an owner which is required to limit access in order to make a profit.

 

Today we would say that railroads were TaaS or Transportation as a Service as opposed to DIY transport in which we walk or use whatever means are available. TaaS would be a rent-seeking model that can only provide transport to destinations that would generate revenue to the provider.

 

Traditional telecommunications is CaaS (Communications as a Service) and its history mirrors that of the railroads to the point that the FCC is modeled on the agency that regulated railroads. The implicit assumption is that we must have a railroad-like system because in the days of the telegraph, analog telephony was very much like a railroad with a service provider assuring reliable delivery.

 

And the Internet, going back to the days of the radio packet networks, has shown us how to do our own communicating using any means available. We understand how to take advantage of opportunities and don't require ordered or reliable delivery. What we do need is an economic model that doesn't require a direct relationship between the user (or application) and the parties along the path who may be assisting in the transport of packets. This is more like a sidewalk assisting walking than a railroads notion of assistance as a service.

 

It's not just about money --- relying on a third party for one's name as in the case of the DNS is also a problem. But the economic model is the gating factor because it's hard to workaround a rent-seeker who owns the path and who must make a profit if we are to communicate at all.

 

We think of telecommunications in terms of the services provided --- telephony and television being primary. But now that all content is converted to bits and we can use services from others (VoIP, Hulu, Apple TV, HBO etc.) as well as services we create ourselves.

 

In this formulation everything is reduced to charging us to exchange bits. No wonder it's so important for the carriers to make sure that all the access points are locked down. If the carriers are to charge you for exchanging bits they must first prevent unbilled bits from passing."

 

Click headline to read more


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc, Arion Holliman
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

We think of telecommunications in terms of the services provided --- telephony and television being primary. But now that all content is converted to bits and we can use services from others (VoIP, Hulu, Apple TV, HBO etc.) as well as services we create ourselves. - */S.Y\

Law of Social Media . POSITIVE SOCIAL INTERACTIONS give the Growth of Your Social Media. A Permanent Creativity born Real Interest & New Connections of Users in Network.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from itsyourbiz
Scoop.it!

Self-Awareness is the Key to Success

Self-Awareness is the Key to Success | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
Self-awareness means knowing your deepest flaws, your strongest attributes, your core guiding beliefs, and your biggest ambitions inside and out. In order to make self-awareness a true advantage in keeping yourself motivated and successful, here are a few tips.

Via Skip Boykin
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

The most important thing during all of this is to remember that these things take time! Self-awareness, like building a business, is a process and it will have ups and downs. The most important thing is to be true to yourself and your goals and always keep evaluating your progress.  -   */S.Y\ Self-Awareness  is  the Positive Result of Transformation with new Mindset.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Aerospace
Scoop.it!

26 Creative Ideas - How to Be Creative When Creativity Is Blocked

Figuring out how to be creative when your creativity is blocked can depend on simply choosing appropriate creative thinking techniques to boost your creative inspiration. Here are 26 creative ideas you can use when you are struggling with how to be creative and boost your innovative thinking. Pick as many of these tested creative thinking techniques as you need to re-start your creative process, find creative inspiration, and overcome a creative block. Try Simplifying Things Start your Creative Process with Things You’ll Throw Away – Decide upfront you’ll discard anything you create in the next hour, then simply dive in and start doing something toward your creative goal right away. You’re willing to trash it, so don’t let any self-criticism block your creative inspiration. Doodle and Eat – Many restaurants use white paper in place of cloth table coverings. Go to one nearby with pens, markers, or crayons and doodle your way through dinner. Write, draw, diagram, or do whatever else will trigger your creativity. Try Trait Transformation – Write down 6 descriptors or characteristics of your creative challenge. For each descriptor, ask how it would help meet your creative objective if it were bigger, smaller, turned around, removed, customized, standardized, or simplified. Asking these questions to twist your situation leads to lots of new creative ideas. Create an Artifact – Find a small something to create that’s more easily achievable than your whole project (it could be working on something you’ve already put in the creative trash heap). Create your small start and use it as a tangible first step to get to your next bigger creative ideas.


Via Alexander Crépin, Infotimes
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

Try Trait Transformation – Write down 6 descriptors or characteristics of your creative challenge. For each descriptor, ask how it would help meet your creative objective if it were bigger, smaller, turned around, removed, customized, standardized, or simplified. Asking these questions to twist your situation leads to lots of new creative ideas.  -    */S.Y\    Transformation of Thought Leader give New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom  and  the  Evolution on  Content.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

The One Big Secret of Amazing Leaders

The One Big Secret of Amazing Leaders | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

Over my career, I have been blessed and I have been cursed. I have been blessed when managed, coached and trained in business, sports and life by some of the world’s best leaders. However at times I have also been cursed by being managed, trained and coached by some of the world’s worst leaders.

 

The best leaders brought out the best in me and helped me to excel. The worst strangled my creativity and questioned my abilities, which robbed me of confidence and courage.

 

What was it that those amazing leaders had that made me develop so much, excel in my skills and abilities and ultimately succeed? The secret is an encouraging spirit.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

The One Big Secret of Amazing Leaders .  THE ENCOURAGING LEADER vs.  THE CRITICAL LEADER  -  */S.Y\    The Evolution of Leader. A Permanent Creativity  give "Things of Perfection",The Real Application of They born Smart Transformation / New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom/. 

more...
Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 16, 2014 5:05 AM

What kind of leader are you - An Encouraging Leader or a Critical Leader?

Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Creativity & Innovation for success
Scoop.it!

Creativity - there's a-Creativity and i-Creativity

Creativity - there's a-Creativity and i-Creativity | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
Creativity loves a crisis. Especially at times of crisis we need creativity. Indeed some of the most creative solutions in human endeavour have come about because of a crisis.

But what do we mean exactly, by ‘Creativity’?
There is artistic creativity: the visual arts, music, literature, design, architecture, film and video, TV and radio, crafts and advertising, for example. These are the kinds of artistic creativity on which the concept of the ‘creative industries’ is based. Examples of artistic creativity are numerous and obvious: the art of Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo, the literature of Shakespeare, the music of Mozart. More recently there have been modern classics in design, architecture and cinema.

But there is also a more general kind of creativity, which we might call ‘ingenuity’, ‘innovation’, ‘invention’, ‘lateral thinking’, or simply ‘problem solving’. We can find this kind of creativity in all fields of human activity: for example in science, education, politics, finance, engineering, agriculture, health care and warfare.

Here are just a few illustrations of creativity outside the arts:

Via Alexander Crépin
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

This  is the  fact of  Development  for   Creativity   or  Transformation  of Creativity.  This  is  good  results. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Story and Narrative
Scoop.it!

8 Storylines For Business Storytellers. Part 2. - Forbes

8 Storylines For Business Storytellers. Part 2. - Forbes | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

In our last blog, we revealed four master storylines for successful business storytelling. These time-proven plots for business narrative can help drive strategic public relations, crisis management, Internet strategy, advertising, treks through the social media landscape, and other business communications functions. Here’s the CliffsNotes version of developing a narrative around your business strategy. PART 2


Via Gregg Morris
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

These time-proven plots for business narrative can help drive strategic public relations, crisis management, Internet strategy, advertising, treks through the social media landscape, and other business communications functions. – */S.Y\ Smart Tips. Many Faces of Constructivism. Look the Mirror of Thought Leader. You can see Much Creativity on Demand.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Entrepreneurship: Lean EntrepreneurshiԀPassion
Scoop.it!

How Setting an Earlier Alarm Changed My Life

How Setting an Earlier Alarm Changed My Life | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

I used to say,


Via Oliver Durrer
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

How Setting an Earlier Alarm Changed My Life.  _  */S.Y\ Change Your Life use Transformation. Transformation of Thought Leader give New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom  and  the  Evolution on  Content.

more...
Oliver Durrer's curator insight, March 12, 4:33 AM
Join the early risers club. It changes your life for the better!
Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Teaching Business Communication and Workplace Issues
Scoop.it!

How to Be an Optimist Without Being a Fool

How to Be an Optimist Without Being a Fool | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
To be successful, you need to understand the very vital difference between believing you will succeed, and believing you will succeed easily. It's the difference between being a realistic optimist and an unrealistic optimist.

Via Bovee & Thill's Online Business Communication Magazines
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:
How to Be an Optimist Without Being a Fool.  -  */S.Y\ A Rational Mindset is Result of the Positive Critical Thinking. 
more...
Bovee & Thill's Online Business Communication Magazines's curator insight, April 11, 2013 6:56 PM

There are quite a number of motivational speakers and self-improvement books out there with a surprisingly simple message: believe that success will come easily to you, and it will.


There is one small problem with this argument, however, which unfortunately doesn't seem to stop anyone from making it: it is utterly false. . .

Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from The Small Business Shrink
Scoop.it!

What Kind of Entrepreneur Are You?

What Kind of Entrepreneur Are You? | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
These four entrepreneur types can help you determine which qualities most drive your entrepreneurial spirit and what that means for your business.

Via Victoria Garcia, Serial Entrepreneur
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

What Kind of Entrepreneur Are You?  -  */S.Y\ A Permanent Creativity is the Best Quality for Leader with New Opportunities for Business.

more...
Victoria Garcia, Serial Entrepreneur's curator insight, November 20, 2013 9:18 PM

Know thy self!  But, enough about me, what do you think about me? 

Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Florida Economic Gardening
Scoop.it!

Thought Leadership Is The New Strategy For Corporate Growth

Thought Leadership Is The New Strategy For Corporate Growth | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

Business growth can be enabled in many ways, yet most corporations still focus on the most traditional ways – whether sales, new products, new markets, new brands, mergers and acquisitions, etc. What many corporations don’t seem to value and/or understand is the power of knowledge sharing. Let’s face it, we are all being challenged to deal with change management in every aspect of our business and no one has all of the answers that the 21st century global market has presented us with. As such, this represents a unique opportunity for corporations and their leaders to cross pollinate knowledge with clients and strategic partners to enable growth and innovation through the power of thought leadership.

 

Thought leadership is clearly a different type of growth strategy for corporations. Consulting and service companies – such as McKinsey, PwC, Deloitte, IBM and others – have been at the forefront of thought leadership. Corporations must now begin to assess, package and share their own best practices, knowledge-sets, case studies and highly skilled and talented leaders to serve as value-added resources to fuel business growth.

 

Corporations that embrace thought leadership as a strategy for growth represent the essence of market leadership, corporate accountability and changing the rules of client engagement.  It requires an organization to share what it is known for — the hallmark of its brand reputation — by being transparent about its best practices and sharing them with clients. It requires its leadership to let go of the past and focus on the present for the betterment of its future and that of its clients. It requires a corporation to think differently about industry standards and accept that the traditional ways of doing things may no longer be as relevant as they once were – and collaborate with clients to solve for the future together. Thought leadership is about introducing new ways of thinking that will reinvent industries and significantly impact business models, the marketplace, employees, consumers and the workplace.

 

Today’s corporate leaders must be potent pioneers — blazing new paths few would go down and having the courage to see them all the way through to the end. To be a pioneer, you need to trust yourself enough to share the unique ways that you think as a thought leader, continually testing your constructively disruptive ideas and ideals. Beyond business growth, thought leadership can fuel growth and opportunities for employee engagement and infuse excitement back into a workplace culture. Employees want their executives to be more vocal in sharing their perspectives about the future. They want leaders that are proactive about informing them of what’s upon the horizon so they can prepare themselves for what’s next and contribute in more meaningful and purposeful ways. Employees have grown tired of the next PowerPoint presentation and want to know more about their executive leaders – who they are as people and what really drives their thinking. Employees want their leaders to know that they are just as aware of change management requirements for growth as their leaders. Employees want more cross pollination of sharing since everyone sees the business through a different lens – and this is when diversity of thought can be a breakthrough.

 

It’s time for corporations to showcase their executives as thought leaders that can strengthen client and supply chain relationships by discovering new ways to make things better in order to grow better together. Diversity of thought is undervalued and misunderstood because people just want to hear themselves talk about what they believe are the right solutions – rather than being more open-minded to embrace new perspectives, regardless of hierarchy or rank. This is why there are so many self-proclaimed thought leaders inside of corporations who are not being taken seriously enough and who associate themselves with leeches and loafers rather than lifters and leaders. These are the leaders that are too disruptive and make it difficult for change management to happen with the required clarity and alignment of thought.

 

Strategic growth requires a deep understanding of what a company is great at doing and identifying those developmental areas that will allow – it to optimally flourish. Yes, you can hire consultants to solve your problems – but they should now play an even more hands-on facilitation role where they can help youconnect the dots, see them more clearly and understand the opportunities for growth within each interconnection point – as you seek to build more holistic relationships with your clients who share your vision, best practices and strategic plans for your future. In a world fueled with change, high-touch, high-trust and highly collaborative relationships are in order.  Be more strategic and collaborative about how you engage in the process of change and the role that knowledge sharing plays.

 

As you begin to use thought leadership as a strategy for business growth and innovation, here are seven questions that will get you started as your organization continues its transformation process during this time of change management.

 

1.  What Do You Solve For?

 

Know what your organization can solve for most effectively and showcase your solution-sets. The changing landscape of the marketplace has made it more difficult for organizations to identify what they are great at solving for – both internally with their employees and externally with clients and supply chain partners.

You have existing clients and business development prospects that can greatly benefit from the competencies and capabilities that you can offer. Allow thought leadership to overcome the traps associated with the dangers of complacency that can lead to the commoditization of your business. Stop being order takers and allow thought leadership to provide a value-added component to your business model that strengthens your marketplace reputation and makes your client relationships more profitable.

 

2.  Who Are the Game Changers?

 

Those leaders in your organization that are applying new ways of thinking to propel growth, innovation and opportunity are the game changers. They are the ones that intimately know the mechanics involved with each line of business, trends, recent challenges, competitive pressures and where the growth opportunities exist. Game changers represent those in your innovation lab that champion ideas and fuel new thinking.

 

They are not afraid to change the conversation  as corporate entrepreneurs and constructive disruptors  that seek to change paradigms, challenge the status quo and enhance  existing business models and client relationships.

 

3.  What Are the Most Impactful Best Practices?

 

Existing best practices are the protocols and methods used to operate more efficiently and effectively. These operating methodologies and frameworks transcend time and new marketplace demands.

 

Based on your clients, lines of business and industry change management requirements – how can your best practices fuel growth for your business when shared and implemented with your clients. Talking about your best practices is a conversation you should be well-prepared to have, making it less likely you’ll be blindsided because you didn’t think through all the issues. You might even own a subject matter that could reinvent your industry.

 

4.  Where Are the Subject Matter Experts (SME)?

 

Identify the experts of your business and those people that have witnessed transformation over the years and have implemented proven solutions. Don’t get them confused with the game changers;  these are the ones that touch the business and every aspect of it, every day. They are the leaders that have lived the long history of client relationships and know their counterparts in the industry you serve. They have become experts as a result of their experience and in many cases are known as the thought leaders in your company.

 

Subject matter experts are the go-to knowledge resource and they are the ones that can guide growth strategies and provide the best recommendations for implementation. They know where the traps exist and what has historically worked and not worked in the past – and the present.

 

5.  What Are the Innovative Breakthroughs?

 

Identify the innovative breakthroughs that made your organization stronger and that allow you to serve your clients better.  What are the new technologies introduced and strategic investments made that your business and your clients have benefited from?

 

Many times there are breakthroughs in an organization that are not viewed as such – but that your clients and industry would benefit from. Always be mindful of the new ways you are thinking and how you are moving the business forward. Don’t assume that others wouldn’t see it as an innovation. Leverage every innovation for the betterment of your organization, its people, brand and client relations. You don’t always need to compare yourself to innovators like Google, Samsung and Apple. Breakthroughs come in all shapes and sizes. The key is that your breakthrough can be measured and shared with your clients to propel growth and opportunity.

 

6.  Where Do the Real Relationships Exist?

 

Assess the relationships that are demonstrating real value and that stimulate growth, innovation and opportunity. Like breakthroughs, the best relationships come in different shapes and sizes. Some relationships are cost centers, others are profit centers.

 

Not all client relationships are fully optimized because it takes time to see beyond the most obvious opportunities.  It’s difficult to explore the opportunities for abundance with clients when your portfolio of products and services may only represent the surface of what your corporation is fully capable of delivering.

 

The key is to know which relationships are adding value to your brand, products, services and people. Evaluate your supply chain and the strategic partnerships embedded throughout the chain. Once you have identified them, share your success stories, the best practices they helped you create, the impact on employee morale, a new client relationship, the new ways you approached and set-forth the standard for building relationships and the role they play to fuel growth of your business.

 

7.  What Are the Desired Outcomes?

 

Explore your current revenue streams and the parts of your business that generate the desired outcomes after you have identified the aforementioned points 1 – 6. Corporate growth strategies are about driving real measureable and sustainable results that impact the bottom line. The investment in corporate growth can be costly and risky. This is why it is so important to discover new ways to capture growth through strategic knowledge sharing / thought leadership that makes your corporation stand out from the crowd.

 

Thought leadership allows you and your clients to broaden each other’s observations of what’s possible to cultivate expansive innovation – and through this process create greater strategic focus to determine the most probable opportunities to seize the greatest potential in the relationship. The result: you realize the power that is inherent by sharing the momentum of the success and significance that you are both capable of creating with one another.

 

Remember this: we are transitioning from a knowledge based to a wisdom based economy. It’s no longer about what you know – but what you do with what you know. In the wisdom based economy, it’s always about trust, transparency and collaboration. A client relationship is about adding value in everything you do and how you do it.  Everyone wants to grow during this time of uncertainty where many are reinventing themselves to find their footing – you must position your organization and its leaders as catalysts for growth through thought leadership.

 

 


Via GrowFL
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

Identify the experts of your business and those people that have witnessed transformation over the years and have implemented proven solutions. Don’t get them confused with the game changers;  these are the ones that touch the business and every aspect of it, every day. They are the leaders that have lived the long history of client relationships and know their counterparts in the industry you serve. They have become experts as a result of their experience and in many cases are known as the thought leaders in your company.   -   */S.Y\   All need TRANSFORMATION / People, Companies, Country,../ . How realize TRANSFORMATION for New Development !?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Developing Creativity
Scoop.it!

24 Creativity Quotes to Bring Out Your Inner Artist

24 Creativity Quotes to Bring Out Your Inner Artist | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
It's tough to be creative day-in and day-out, but as a creative professional you may not have a choice. Use these 24 creativity quotes to inspire yourself.

Via Douglas Eby
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

“Don’t think. Thinking is the enemy of creativity. It’s self-conscious, and anything self-conscious is lousy. You can’t try to do things. You simply must do things” – Ray Bradbury.  */S.Y\ A Permanent Creativity  give "Things of Perfection",The Real Application of They born Smart Transformation / New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom/.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Balance: People & Business
Scoop.it!

Assessing Creativity

February 2013 | Volume 70 | Number 5
Creativity Now! Pages 28-34

 

Assessing Creativity--Susan M. Brookhart

 

 

We can assess creativity—and, in the process, help students become more creative.

Fifth graders were busy writing acrostic poems on small posters. One girl wrote a school spirit poem, with the first letter of each line spelling out the school name: S for "super," N for "nice," and so on. She even drew a picture of a bobcat (pictures were not required) that was a spot-on replication of the school mascot. A boy wrote an acrostic poem with the first letter of each line spelling out his name: A for "agressive" (unfortunately spelled incorrectly); N for "nutty"; and so on. No picture.

So what kind of feedback did the teacher give? Her comments gave students the impression that the girl's poem was perfect and that the boy's poem was not so good, mostly because of that one misspelled word and the fact that his lines sloped downward on the poster.

This assignment was a giant missed opportunity for both students. The girl's work was a skillful replication of things she'd seen before. All the words were simple, the school spirit theme was a common one, and the point of her drawing was to duplicate the school mascot. She needed to know that her work was proficient—but she also needed to be challenged to work with more originality when writing poems. She only received half that feedback.

The boy's work was more original. Although the poem was only five lines long, it gave readers a real sense of who he was—or, at least, how he saw himself. He needed to know that he had used a prescribed format creatively—but he also needed to be challenged to check his spelling and use a ruler to make straight lines of text on posters. He, too, only received half that feedback.

What was missing in the teacher's feedback is easy to diagnose—her criteria for success were too limited—but it's harder to put right. Can creativity be an assessment category? If so, how do you handle it? Surely you wouldn't downgrade the girl's perfectly good poem, beautifully and dutifully written and presented.

Here's how to assess and give feedback about creativity and, in the process, help students become more creative in their work.

What Is Creativity?

Creativity is a simple concept that can be difficult to get your head around. In its most basic sense, creative means "original and of high quality" (Perkins, 1981, p. 6). The girl's school spirit poem was of high quality, but it was workmanlike and derivative. The boy's self-analysis poem was original, and the poetic composition and word choice were fine; he just needed to attend to the quality of the mechanics. Of course, a poem that is uninterpretable or meaningless, no matter how original, can't be creative.

What does it look like when schoolwork is original and of high quality? Probably the foremost characteristic of creative students is that they put things together in new ways (Brookhart, 2010). For example, while writing a poem about a sunset, a student who observes that moment when the sunset looks very much like a sunrise and makes the connection to other endings that can also foreshadow beginnings is more creative than a student who describes that moment as "red and fiery."

Students who are able to put things together in new ways can observe things others might miss, construct more novel products, give more novel performances, use more unusual or unconventional imagery to make points, observe ordinary things and find in them an area to wonder about or a problem to solve, and the like.

Not all schoolwork, even performance assessments, supports this sort of thinking. Before you can assess creativity, you need to make sure that the tasks you set for students are conducive to creativity.

Stimulating Creative Thinking

Myriad opportunities for fostering creativity are right under our noses in school, because learning is a generative act. However, what's missing in many classrooms is deliberately noticing and naming opportunities for creativity when they occur, giving feedback on the creative process, and teaching students that creativity is a valued quality.

Brainstorming in any subject can be a creative activity. Elementary teachers who ask students to begin the writing process with a graphic organizer, list, or outline can give feedback on the originality of the ideas as well as their suitability for the writing assignment. For example, an elementary teacher might ask students to list several farm animals, imagine a funny situation that might happen to each, and then pick one animal and write a story about it.

Science teachers who have students brainstorm a list of hypotheses to test can give feedback on the originality of ideas as well as their suitability for the experiment that the students will design. For example, a teacher might mention that her coffee cools too quickly in the cup and then ask students to brainstorm a list of things that might slow down the cooling process, write a hypothesis about each one, and design an experiment to test one hypothesis.

Assignments that require students to produce new ideas or reorganize existing ideas in a new way are likely to foster student creativity. In mathematics, asking students to identify a problem for which multiplication would be useful in finding the solution requires more creativity from them than giving students a multiplication word problem to solve. Similarly, in music, an assignment in which students write an original melody requires more creativity than one in which they analyze a preexisting melody.

Assignments that require students to put two things together are also likely to promote creativity. For example, in English language arts, asking students to write or speak about how The Adventures of Tom Sawyer would have been different had Huckleberry Finn been the main character sparks more creativity than asking students to discuss the character of Tom Sawyer. In social studies, asking students how the events that led up to World War I might be handled if they happened today fosters more creativity than asking students to discuss the causes of World War I.

Students will still exhibit a range of originality and quality in their work, even in response to these more creative prompts. Teachers can give feedback on both of these aspects of the work.

Sometimes teachers and students think that any assignment that allows student choice is conducive to creativity. Although that may be true in general, only assignments that allow student choice in matters related to what the student is supposed to learn develop student creativity in the area under study. For example, if you ask students to compare characters in two novels and allow them to choose the characters or novels, they have the opportunity to develop creativity in their approach to literary criticism. However, if you ask students to compare two specified characters and just give them choices about whether they want to write an essay, give a speech, or write a song, students will not have that opportunity.

Criteria for Creativity

Creativity is not a synonym for clever, humorous, artistically pleasing, enthusiastic, or persuasive. Those are all great qualities that we can assess in their own right, but we shouldn't confuse them with creativity. As early childhood educator Lilian Katz once railed, "Creativity is not animals with long eyelashes!"

Rather, criteria for creativity should match what we expect in creative work: originality and high quality. Creative students

Recognize the importance of a deep knowledge base and continually work to learn new things.Are open to new ideas and actively seek them out.Find source material in a wide variety of media, people, and events.Organize and reorganize ideas into different categories or combinations and then evaluate whether the results are interesting, new, or helpful.Use trial and error when they are unsure how to proceed, viewing failure as an opportunity to learn. (Brookhart, 2010, pp. 128–129)

 

The first four characteristics lead to qualities in the work that we can observe, assess, and provide feedback on. For example, are the source materials varied? Are ideas organized in a fresh way and uniquely suited to the problem or product? The last characteristic—using trial and error—is about the student's approach to learning and may or may not show itself in the finished work.

A Rubric for Creativity

If all of these first four characteristics are in play in an assignment, then a rubric like the one in Figure 1 (p. 31) may support teachers and students in assessing creativity (Brookhart, 2013). The rubric describes four levels of creativity—very creative, creative, ordinary/routine, and imitative—in four different areas—variety of ideas, variety of sources, novelty of idea combinations, and novelty of communication.

Read more: http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/feb13/vol70/num05/Assessing-Creativity.aspx


Via Lynnette Van Dyke, David Schultz
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

Recognize the importance of a deep knowledge base and continually work to learn new things.
Are open to new ideas and actively seek them out.
Find source material in a wide variety of media, people, and events.
Organize and reorganize ideas into different categories or combinations and then evaluate whether the results are interesting, new, or helpful. */S.Y\ A Permanent Creativity is the Best Quality for Leader with New Opportunities for Business.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Scoop.it!

Lawmakers hear mixed message on limiting spectrum bidding | ComputerWorld.com

Lawmakers hear mixed message on limiting spectrum bidding | ComputerWorld.com | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission should limit the amount of spectrum that giant mobile carriers AT&T and Verizon Communications are able to buy in an auction scheduled for mid-2015, some U.S. senators said Tuesday.

 

But lawmakers could reach no consensus on proposals to limit the bids of the two largest mobile carriers in the U.S. in the upcoming auction of spectrum now controlled by television stations. Some Republican senators, along with an AT&T representative and other witnesses, including an AT&T official, called for unrestricted bidding in the mid-2015 auction of 600MHz spectrum.

 

"The FCC should let all interested participants freely compete against one other in the open market," Sen. John Thune, a South Dakota Republican, said during a Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee hearing. "It should avoid putting its thumb on the scales. The value of using spectrum auctions is that the free market is more effective at allocating spectrum than relying on the subjective opinions and predictions of government officials."

 

Thune and Joan Marsh, AT&T's vice president of federal regulatory affairs, urged the FCC to reject calls by carriers Sprint and T-Mobile USA, along with the U.S. Department of Justice and some other advocates, to cap the amount of spectrum the two largest carriers can buy. In the so-called incentive auction, TV stations would volunteer to give up prime spectrum for mobile broadband services in exchange for a cut of the auction proceeds.

 

T-Mobile and Sprint, through recent mergers, have become stronger competitors and don't need the FCC's help, Marsh told senators.

 

"An open auction is the fairest method to assign licenses because it ensures that all applicants have the same opportunity to obtain spectrum," Marsh said. "An open auction would allow market competition, rather than regulation, to allocate spectrum, ensuring that it is put to its best and highest use."

 

Still, if the FCC decides to cap spectrum purchases, it should do so for all carriers and not just the two largest, Marsh said.

 

Some other witnesses agreed with that approach. The FCC should adopt a "no-piggie rule" that limits any one carrier from buying too much of the available spectrum, said Harold Feld, senior vice president of Public Knowledge and a frequent AT&T critic.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

CEO leadership is needed to push analytics thinking.  -   */S.Y\ Business Intelligence : New Mindsight from Thought Leader can realize New Business Decisions for SME's .

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

Data as the New Currency

Data as the New Currency | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

Google “data as a currency,” and you’ll get back search results in the millions. “What if Web Users Could Sell Their Own Data?” asks a blogger for the New York Times.1 A story in Information Management highlights “Big Data Analytics: The Currency of the 21st Century Enterprise.”. You’ll find stories heralding big data as the new currency for science, stories on the personal data marketplace, and even stories on stolen data as a currency—not to mention prominent TED talks, World Economic Forum studies, and multiple books on the subject. The gist of the argument: Personal data has an economic value that can be bought, sold, and traded.

 

Remarkably, one area has gone largely unexplored: the role that government will—or should—play in establishing data as a currency. Given the problems governments face in maintaining stable monetary systems, many data enthusiasts would just as soon have government stay away from this emerging instrument of exchange.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

 Google “data as a currency,” and you’ll get back search results in the millions. “What if Web Users Could Sell Their Own Data?” asks a blogger for the New York Times.1 A story in Information Management highlights “Big Data Analytics: The Currency of the 21st Century Enterprise.”2 You’ll find stories heralding big data as the new currency for science, stories on the personal data marketplace, and even stories on stolen data as a currency—not to mention prominent TED talks, World Economic Forum studies, and multiple books on the subject. The gist of the argument: Personal data has an economic value that can be bought, sold, and traded. - */S.Y\ Big Data has an economic value, after the right understanding with New Mindset.

more...
Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 20, 2013 5:27 PM

Government is one of the biggest producers of data—and one of the few that deliver data to the public free of charge. Governments already regulate how organizations may use personal data and myriad other issues related to data.

Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

Codes That Changed The World

Codes That Changed The World | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
BBC Radio 4 has a short series on important programming languages that are currently available to download. Can you present the ideas and history of computing languages to a general audience?

 
BBC Radio 4 is well respected as a news and fact based broadcaster, but all of the media has a problem when it comes to reporting science so it is possible to explain to a radio audience anything at all about the classic languages?
The first language covered is Fortran, which really does deserve to be called the first programming language. In the radio program we get the flavor of the effect Fortran had on programming and some recollections of the time when it suddenly made numeric programming possible for the non-expert. You could say that the introduction of Fortran was similar to the introduction of the spreadsheet. Ah those were the days when instructions were entered on punch cards one per card and yet this sort of thing isn't really about the language - they all used punch cards or paper tape. All the way though the series there is a basic confusion between the technology of the time - punch cards, batch processing, line printer output, and so on.
Apart from noting that its name stands for FORmula TRANslation the achievement that made Fortran special, isn't discussed. The key feature of the language, worked out and implemented by John Backus was a scheme for translating arbitrary mathematical expressions into machine runnable programs. Being able to use mathematical expressions in a computer language was the real breakthrough. 
Cobol - the subject of the second program wasn't so blessed. Its inventor didn't solve the problem of formula translation and so the language had to do math using statements like ADD 1 TO TOTAL rather then TOTAL=TOTAL+1. Later Cobol got formula translation and it wasn't quite as wordy as it first was. Cobol may have had the goal of making programming more like English, but it also neatly avoided the problem of formula translation. The episode concentrates on Cobol being wordy and not dying out and, of course, Grace Hopper. 
From Cobol we jump to Basic, and this is the one most programmers working to day will have encountered. This episode is really about the microcomputer revolution and how Basic proved to be a good choice for limited hardware and its limited programmers. Lots of reminiscences about the history of the BBC Micro and similar - not really much on the language itself. Eventually the program picks up on the fact that Basic was an unstructured language, i.e. the goto considered harmful problem. This wasn't really anything particularly targeted at Basic, however. At the end we have an in praise of home computing and the Raspberry Pi. 
The fourth and final language is Java. This is the most complex of the language stories. We know that Java is first successful structured, object-oriented, language based on a virtual machine that makes it possible to run on almost any hardware. The story that Java became important because of its ability to be embedded in a web page - something that is no longer a popular way to do things - is well told. Also its translation to the server is captured. However the program swallows the propaganda that Java is the language of the future IoT and presents it as fact.
Finally we have a round up episode - The Tower Of Babel. This puts forward the view that we need a Babel of languages to cope with the different tasks that we need to tackle. There is a big propaganda section on functional programming and an emphasis on Haskell as the language for geniuses and a final plea for everyone to learn a language. Why no mention of object-oriented programming, logic programming or any of the other alternative paradigms? Too difficult, perhaps. But the change to structured modular programming and then to full object-oriented programming is perhaps the big story of languages and it is completely ignored. 
The central issues of what a computer language is all about and how the development of different approaches influenced the way programmers think wasn't even hinted at. 
 

 
It is very difficult to know who these radio programs are targeting. Certainly not programmers, but I can't see that any useful information was passed to the non-specialist. This is such a shame because there really is an exciting story of amazing ideas that can be told.
I think the best part of the programs is the background of songs based on reading a program from the language being discussed - it could catch on in a big way. 
More Information
http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/r4codes
The series is only available for 30 days. 
Related Articles
John Backus - the Father of Fortran       
History of Computer Languages - the classical decade, 1950s 
Grace Hopper - The Mother of Cobol       
Kemeny & Kurtz - The Invention Of BASIC        
Edsger Dijkstra - The Poetry Of Programming
Computer Languages by Committee - the 1960s
The Rise Of People Power - Computer languages in the 70's       
Towards Objects and Functions - Computer Languages In The 1980s
 
To be informed about new articles on I Programmer, install the I Programmer Toolbar, subscribe to the RSS feed, follow us on, Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Linkedin,  or sign up for our weekly newsletter.

Via Charles Tiayon
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

Codes That Changed The World.  -  */S.Y\

The Modern World has Index of Transformation. QR - Codes,Cellular, Cryptocurrency,.. ext.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Changemaking
Scoop.it!

INNOVATIVE THINKING: Business Needs to Do What Government Can't

INNOVATIVE THINKING: Business Needs to Do What Government Can't | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

"How easy is it to change a flawed economic or governance system, such as our current 1.5-planets-and-counting forms of capitalism? Most of us would say it's exceptionally hard, particularly when power is concentrated in a few incumbent companies with deeply rooted vested interests. The financial crisis is a prime example of too few people holding the reins."


Via The Ashoka Community
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

The future, he argued, lies with institutional forms based on networks, “an open, fluid team of teams”. - */S.Y\ The Evolution on Web born Revolution on Mindset for Consumers. New Products & Services with Original Quality.

more...
The Ashoka Community's curator insight, February 7, 2013 4:48 PM

Ashoka believes we can no longer rely on the old rules, hierarchies and ways of doing things. Every person, and every institution in society, must act as a changemaker to succeed in a world marked by accelerating change. Institutions where a few people tell "everyone else how to repeat together efficiently, be it a law firm or an assembly line" will be left behind. Rather, as Ashoka Founder Bill Drayton explains in this piece, the future lies with institutional forms based on networks, "an open, fluid team of teams. Moreover, businesses can and must play a key part of forming solutions todays most pressing challenges.

Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from The Marketing Technology Alert
Scoop.it!

How to Assess an Ad's Creativity - HBR

How to Assess an Ad's Creativity - HBR | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
This test can help you better target your ad investments.

 

Originality: An original ad comprises elements that are rare, surprising, or move away from the obvious and commonplace. The focal element here is uniqueness of the ideas or features contained in the ad.

Flexibility: Flexibility is seen in an ad's ability to link a product to a range of different uses or ideas.

Elaboration:  Many ads are creative because they contain unexpected details or extend basic ideas so they become more intricate and complicated.

Synthesis: An ad that is creative along this dimension blends normally unrelated objects or ideas.

Artistic Value: Ads with a high level of artistic creativity contain aesthetically appealing verbal, visual or sound elements. Their production quality is high, their dialog is clever, their color palettes is original, or their choice of music is somehow memorable.

 

Combining elaboration with originality had almost double the average impact of a creative pairing on sales, closely followed by the combination of Artistic Value and Originality (1.89, accounting for 11% of all combos). The weakest combination was flexibility and elaboration, which had less than half the average pairing's impact on sales. Yet we found that in terms of usage there was little difference between them: advertisers did not seem to favor any one combination over the other.


Via marketingIO
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

Focusing only on the components that are directly related to how consumers consume and process advertisements, Smith’s group defined advertising creativity as the degree of divergence from a norm along five dimensions: originality, flexibility, elaboration, synthesis, and artistic value. - */S.Y\ Essential Qualities Of Leadership. - Creativity, Permanent Creativity & Multi - Level Creativity.

more...
marketingIO's curator insight, May 22, 2013 9:38 AM

So damn subjective. Regardless, the question is how can this information be used by the B2B marketer? We think that you may substitute "advertising" with "content marketing" so that the combination of elaboration and originality may have an impact on your demand generation efforts. Having said that, isn't the combination of elaboration and originality really the element of surprise? And isn't surprise one of the marketer's greatest tools? End result: THE TOPICS OF YOUR CONTENT SHOULD ELICIT SURPRISE!


  • See the article at blogs.hbr.org
  • Receive a daily summary of The Marketing Automation Alert directly to your inbox. Subscribe here (your privacy is protected).
  • If you like this scoop, PLEASE share by using the links below.

iNeoMarketing drives more revenue and opportunities for B2B companies using marketing technologies. Contact us

Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Performance Intervention
Scoop.it!

Good Versus Effective Leadership - Room for Debate

Good Versus Effective Leadership - Room for Debate | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

It isn’t enough for someone in a leadership position to get things done. A successful leader must also have good character. By Ronald E. Riggio.

Effective Leadership Requires Authenticity

to Live Long and Prosper 

 

Goffee and Jones describe this as authentic leadership in "Why Should Anyone Be Led by You?", while Ronald Riggio develops this into a clear and concise list of behaviours. The reference to sport set me thinking about a sport closer to my heart than cycling.  No laws were broken in what I am about to describe; I continue to admire those involved, even if I do not understand their reasoning or behaviour. 

 

My sport is football - always was and always will be.  I refer to the game using the round ball and not the one with all the body armour.  I am a life-long fan of Crystal Palace Football Club and though we have often travelled together through the valley of despair, I would rather give up watching the game than ever support another club.  

 

Crystal Palace is on the back of a 12 game unbeaten run.  They won 5-0 on Tuesday night to go top of the league.  Three weeks ago, their manager resigned and completed a lateral move (in organizational terms) to manage a club struggling at the other end of same league.  This manager, an ex-Palace player, has now taken the rest of his management team with him. 

 

Meanwhile, the players at Palace perform their socks off – just as Kimball Fisher’s classic “Leading Self-Directed Work Teams” predicts.  The quote before Chapter 19 (on the latter stages of Team Maturity) is by Raymond Gilmartin, the then CEO of Becton Dickinson.  He states, “Forget structure invented by the guys at the top.  You’ve got to let the task form the organisation.” How apt!

 

A fan is like an employee, watching the behaviour of its leaders and trying to make sense of it all.  Putting all the theory to one side, why does a successful manager, with a long history with a club, just up and leave when he is starting to reap the rewards on the field of play and the plaudits from his peers – he was named manager of the month in October?  Is it money, ambition, a fresh challenge or a rift behind the scenes?  Tweets and Blogs fill the void with rumour, speculation and, in some cases, vitriol.  But when I read Ronald’s list again, I realise that any harsh words are inappropriate.  The departed management team ticked all the behaviours on his list. 

 

And now we are happy.  The club have appointed one of the best managers in the league, with a reputation for winning promotion and at least for tonight, we are out-performing the competition.  Just as in business, it could all be different tomorrow, but at least for the day we will enjoy the ride… and wish the new management team at Bolton Wanderers our very best in every game they play, except one (of course). 

 

For more:

www.pyramidodi.com

http://www.pyramidodi.com/michael-salmon.html

http://www.pyramidodi.com/news.html

 


Via Michael Salmon
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

Doing the Right Things vs. Simply Getting Things Done . - */S.Y\ Critical Thinking give new Mindset, becoming a Thought Leader. The Evolution of Leader. A Permanent Creativity give "Things of Perfection",The Real Application of They born Smart Transformation / New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom/. The ability to tell a good story will be valued over spreadsheets, graphs, and data points. - */S.Y\ A History of Thought Leader is Storytelling of Charmer On-Line in Network .

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Science News
Scoop.it!

The Aha! Moment. Neural Basis of Solving Problems with Insight | The Creativity Post

The Aha! Moment. Neural Basis of Solving Problems with Insight | The Creativity Post | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
Solving a problem that requires creative insight prompts distinct changes in brain activities called the “Aha! moment".

Via Sakis Koukouvis
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

The Aha! Moment: the Neural Basis of Solving Problems with Insight. - */S.Y\ Smart Tips. Many Faces of Constructivism. Look the Mirror of Thought Leader. You can see Much Creativity on Demand.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Story and Narrative
Scoop.it!

Storytelling: the power of patient engagement

Storytelling: the power of patient engagement | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

To celebrate national story telling week, we implore patients to share their stories and impact the lives of others through narrative therapy, and encourage information providers to consider the power of a good story in supporting patients.


Via Gregg Morris
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

...  and impact the lives of others through narrative therapy, and encourage information providers to consider the power of a good story in supporting patients. - */S.Y\ The Fine Content for through narrative therapy.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Remarquables
Scoop.it!

Contrôler ses rêves, c’est possible... mais difficile : mode d’emploi

Contrôler ses rêves, c’est possible... mais difficile : mode d’emploi | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
Une étude parue récemment dans le Journal of Neuroscience tente de mettre en relation la zone cérébrale impliquée dans le rêve lucide et la personnalité de ceux qui l'exercent régulièrement.

Via Jean-Pierre Blanger
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

Information en retour,  c’est possible...  -   */S.Y\ 

 Mirror of  Leader . Smart Tips. Many Faces of Constructivism. Look the Mirror of Thought Leader. You can see Much Creativity on Demand.

more...
No comment yet.