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Why Content Curation Is Here to Stay | Fast Company

Why Content Curation Is Here to Stay | Fast Company | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

For website content publishers and content creators, there’s a debate raging as to the rights and wrongs of curation. While content aggregation has been around for a while with sites using algorithms to find and link to content, the relatively new practice of editorial curation — human filtering and organizing — has created what I’m dubbing, “The Great Creationism Debate.”


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    For  the  Development  need  the  understanding  what  to  do  now !

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HR Leaders: Data, Engagement and Attracting Talent Are in Key in 2017 - Workforce Magazine

HR Leaders: Data, Engagement and Attracting Talent Are in Key in 2017 - Workforce Magazine | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
Data, employee engagement and attracting talent will propel successful companies in 2017. As 2017 approaches, robots — disappointing as it may be — are not a staple in every household or workplace. At least not in the way many had hoped. However, autonomic systems are popping up in places unheard of even a decade ago. What does this mea
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HR leaders should set their sights on data, employee engagement and attracting top talent in the upcoming year. - */S.Y\ Power up your Thinking with a Permanent Creativity .
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How to Perform a Local, Competitive SEO Analysis

How to Perform a Local, Competitive SEO Analysis | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
Businesses that rely on local consumers should periodically examine the search engine optimization efforts of their competitors.
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Leadership and behavior: Mastering the mechanics of reason and emotion 

Leadership and behavior: Mastering the mechanics of reason and emotion  | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

The confluence of economics, psychology, game theory, and neuroscience has opened new vistas—not just on how people think and behave, but also on how organizations function. Over the past two decades, academic insight and real-world experience have demonstrated, beyond much doubt, that when companies channel their competitive and collaborative instincts, embrace diversity, and recognize the needs and emotions of their employees, they can reap dividends in performance.


The pioneering work of Nobel laureate and Harvard professor Eric Maskin in mechanism design theory represents one powerful application. Combining game theory, behavioral economics, and engineering, his ideas help an organization’s leaders choose a desired result and then design game-like rules that can realize it by taking into account how different independently acting, intelligent people will behave.

 

The work of Hebrew University professor Eyal Winter challenges and advances our understanding of what “intelligence” really means. In his latest book, Feeling Smart: Why Our Emotions Are More Rational Than We Think (PublicAffairs, 2014), Winter shows that although emotions are thought to be at odds with rationality, they’re actually a key factor in rational decision making.


In this discussion, led by McKinsey partner Julia Sperling, a medical doctor and neuroscientist by training, and McKinsey Publishing’s David Schwartz, Maskin and Winter explore some of the implications of their work for leaders of all stripes.


Via David Hain, Ron McIntyre
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If you have large enough data sets—millions or billions of pieces of information—then the lack of control is no longer as IMPORTANT a concern. Big data sets help compensate for the messiness of real-life behavior.                                                             */S.Y\  Creative Reflection determine your Capacity for Rethinking with New Mindset for Working  with  BIG DATA .
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David Hain's curator insight, December 16, 2016 7:33 AM

We are emotional beings, but complexity demands that we are able to analyse emotions rationally to make sensible decision choices!

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, December 19, 2016 2:18 PM

Challenges!

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Don't Innovate. Create a Culture of Innovation

Don't Innovate. Create a Culture of Innovation | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
While many organizations focus on addressing problems, the most successful focus on raising the bar. One of the ways they do this is by creating a culture where innovation thrives.

 

While many organizations focus on addressing problems, the most successful focus on raising the bar. One of the ways they do this is by creating a culture where innovation thrives. When this organizational strength is magnified, it can become a source of competitive advantage.

 

One of my clients asked me to help identify the best practices of leaders who were the most innovative in his organization. In many interviews and meetings, there was very little discussion about brainstorming, generating ideas, prototyping, and the like—the kind of things most of us think about when we consider institutionalizing innovation. Instead, I heard what many of us would call excellent practices for leadership. My one-sentence conclusion: Excellence in leading innovation has far less to do with the leader having innovative ideas; it has everything to do with how that leader creates a culture where innovation and creativity thrives in every corner. Okay, maybe I cheated by having a sentence with a semi-colon but you get the gist in short form.


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The more passion people have for the work that they do, the more likely they are to demonstrate positive energy and success in life. Terri Funk Graham Challenge the status quo - */S.Y\ Creative Reflection determine your Capacity for Rethinking with New Mindset.
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Meet the social media leaders who will show you how to shake up your social strategy

At The Social Shake-Up on May 22-24, 2017, speakers from Coca-Cola, Atlanta Hawks, American Cancer Society, IBM, Arby's, Ernst & Young, Carter's and Cox will share out-of-the-ordinary social media successes.
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*/S.Y\  New Media Symbiosis. This is the Positive Effect of Interaction in Social Media / Facebook, Twitter, Scoop.it, LinkedIn, About me, SlideShare, Viadeo, .../.
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Keys for a Successful Digital Transformation via Eric Sheninger

Keys for a Successful Digital Transformation via Eric Sheninger | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
A blog about digital leadership, pedagogy, learning, and transformative change in education.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Keys for a Successful Digital Transformation - */S.Y\ Transformation of Thought Leader give New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom and the Evolution on Content. Power Score is a Fuction of Your Permanent Creativity .
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Conduct a Content Analysis in 3 Easy Steps

Conduct a Content Analysis in 3 Easy Steps | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
One of the biggest challenges that content marketers face is reporting ROI. Very rarely is success easy to measure: your blog readers will often take numer
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*/S.Y\    Transformation of Thought Leader give New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom and the Evolution on Content.
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20 Characteristics of a Successful Solopreneur

20 Characteristics of a Successful Solopreneur | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
Recognizing some of the traits will help you to know yourself a little better and work better with other solopreneurs.
Via Enzo Calamo
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3. Creativity.  -  */S.Y\  Determine Your Format of Creativity for Development with New Mindset. New Products & Services for Consumers.
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The Incredible Technology Behind Bitcoin Is About To Change The World

The Incredible Technology Behind Bitcoin Is About To Change The World | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
Bitcoin has crashed, and it may well crash again. But that doesn't matter.

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The World is Changing .  -    */S.Y\  The Modern World has Index of Transformation. QR - Codes, Cellular, Cryptocurrency , ... ext.
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fred park's curator insight, March 16, 2015 2:11 AM

We have known this for a while.

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Inside Forbes: Introducing the Follow Bar, News Navigation for the Era of Social Media - Forbes

Inside Forbes: Introducing the Follow Bar, News Navigation for the Era of Social Media - Forbes | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
For 95 years, FORBES has been about entrepreneurial capitalism. That clear, unwavering mission is at the core of our exciting new platform.

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"The best entrepreneurs always have been and always will be problem solvers." Richard Branson  -  */S.Y\  Law of Social Media. POSITIVE SOCIAL INTERACTIONS give the Growth of Your Social Media. A Permanent Creativity born Real Interest & New Connections of Users in Network.
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Digital Publishing: Developing a Proper Social Media Strategy with Twitter

Digital Publishing: Developing a Proper Social Media Strategy with Twitter | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

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Digital Publishing: Developing a Proper Social Media Strategy with Twitter - */S.Y\ Shareability on Twitter is best way for New Understanding of A Permanent Creativity.
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Why is Microsoft buying LinkedIn for $26.2bn? CEO Satya Nadella explains

Why is Microsoft buying LinkedIn for $26.2bn? CEO Satya Nadella explains | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
Microsoft just announced that it is buying LinkedIn, the professional social network, for a whopping $26.
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Why is Microsoft buying LinkedIn for  $26.2bn?!  -  */S.Y\ Microsoft  understand the importance of Social Media /Next Level / for the Future .
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God: Personification ≠ Person

God: Personification ≠ Person | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
God is a personification, not a person -- an undeniable interpretation, not an otherworldly tyrant. If we fail to grasp this, we cannot possibly understand religion or religious differences.

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*/S.Y\ Personification of Spiral Leader for New Media is Real Way for Development in the World .
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Don Berg's curator insight, September 17, 2015 7:21 PM

I suspect that most of the people that know me would not have any objection to this idea, but I am wondering if there are some few of you who do. I am curious and welcome your comments, even if you wanted to make them privately. I promise that I am not interested in changing your mind, I just want to know if anyone finds it objectionable or difficult or just off in some way.

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Don't Underestimate the Value of Chemistry in Startup Teams

Don't Underestimate the Value of Chemistry in Startup Teams | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
Find the right mix of people and they will carry your startup to the top.
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*/S.Y\  Determine Your Format of Creativity for Development with New Mindset. New Products & Services for SME's .
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Idea of 'excellence for all is nonsense', says former Harrow head - Telegraph

Idea of 'excellence for all is nonsense', says former Harrow head - Telegraph | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
Barnaby Lenon, who is still Chairman of the Independent Schools Council, argued that a university education is a privilege not a right during an Oxford University debate

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“Selection by ability has become taboo, but the idea of excellence for all is nonsense.”  */S,Y\  Power up your Thinking with a Permanent Creativity  for  SME's .
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Data vs creativity? Data should be a huge tool in the ongoing fight against mediocrity

Data vs creativity? Data should be a huge tool in the ongoing fight against mediocrity | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
I just don’t get the basis of this argument. 

The most successful businesses (and ones I would deem as progressive and creative) of recent years have been those that have built their strategy based upon ‘data for good – divine data’. 

Data that has driven actionable insight and fuelled creativity rather than overwhelmed and brought it to the lowest common dominator. Data that has in turn led to greater empathy, personalisation, removal of the unnecessary and ultimately value. Data in digital is optimising user experience and information architecture and fuelling individual enhanced experiences. It shouldn’t be about marketing’s obsession with data, but businesses’ obsession with data.

Data by any other name is insight. Without knowing or seeing each and every agency’s creative brief, I could make a fairly well informed judgment that there is a section on said brief that asks the question ‘what is the key insight?’ in one way or another. This insight then fuels the proposition from which every creative idea – every on-brief idea, that is – is spawned.

Who is so anti-data in the context of creativity? Data should be a huge tool in the ongoing fight against mediocrity. Data should be the way in which agencies can remove subjectivity from decision making. Data should be embraced to help clients de-risk bravery when it comes to creativity. Data should enable greater creativity by giving clients confidence when buying braver ideas.

Data and creativity should have a symbiotic relationship without tension. We don’t expect clients to make decisions on where to place their advertising and messages based upon which billboard or poster site looks nice or instinctively feels right, or what TV programmes they think might be right based upon ‘informed’ opinion. Programmatic is yet more evidence of the evolution of how data is shaping decision making in real-time.

Clients make these significant seven and sometimes eight-figure investments because media agencies have the tools that help them make the better decisions, likely to have the greatest impact with the lowest wastage – based upon statistically sound empirical evidence. 

It seems quite counterintuitive to then put a greater risk on the future commercial success of the brand down to, at worst, being seduced by a fantastic agency planner and creative storyteller at presentation of the idea; or at best, the storyteller backed up with a bit of ‘home grown’ qual. The vast majority of campaign budgets (80/90 per cent for argument's sake) are in media yet it is the creative (10/20 per cent) that has the power to disproportionately pay back to a significant extent even outside of the campaign period. Yet for the most part the data rigour is seldom exercised to the same extent.

The right type of data availability forces discipline and robustness in thinking; it should unlock greater transformational potential because when understood and interrogated fully it should make arguments bulletproof without suffocating the creative piece of magic that underpins it. Without it you are effectively making informed guesses with seriously high stakes.

However there is a key watchout. I’m sure each and every creative or frustrated account man reading this may highlight how their most creative ideas never seem to make it through the ‘creative killer’ of a focus group. Creativity, as previously stated, should have an equal, symbiotic relationship with useful and actionable data – not one rule the other. 

That also highlights what I consider to be an extremely damaging force on creativity: the ‘focus group’, or bad data as I fondly refer to it. Yes it is a form of data evaluation and validation – yet for me it more often generates futile results. We are replacing one small decision making committee with another – the client with the ‘consumer’ (or the  professional qual-grouper who very loosely fits the demographic profile). They are equally incredibly important in the process; however true creativity that captures hearts and minds and at best transcends audience to create further affinity or reappraisal will always win through if the idea is strong enough. It is scale of the data that would prove this.

The big misconception is that if data begins to ‘win’ more in the tension against creativity it will lead to formulaic science-based outputs and a creative industry devolving into an automated numbers industry. If this is so, why are creative agencies so keen to share and celebrate KPIs and metrics as part of the mainstay of the award entry video? Data at this point is the validation of excellence in creativity and effectiveness that we all can learn from and be inspired by. But this has then led to other clients and agencies feeling empowered enough to want to emulate these successes by being creatively liberated through these commercial case studies.  

Great creativity, creativity that can impact culture as well as the bottom-line, will be more commonplace with the progressive client and agency minds that open themselves up to take those leaps of faith, de-risked through the value of data.

There are always going to be anomalies, however this is the point – is a piece of work creative if it is ineffective?

Via Charles Tiayon
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Data vs creativity? Data should be a huge tool in the ongoing fight against mediocrity - */S.Y\ Charismatic Leadership as a Function of Permanent Creativity with new Business for SME's . 
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Ethan E Rix's curator insight, October 29, 2014 9:06 AM

Is data and creative at odds with one another? The title of this article first gave the impression that it would compare the pros and cons of creative to that of data driven strategy. However, reading deeper the writer conveys the complementary nature of these tools that are available to a marketer to aid in the creative process.


If anything, data is the insight that creates the backbone of a good idea. To a good analyst, the millions of seemingly inhuman data points tells a story. It can relay values, empathy, and personalities of an entire sample which should drive the creative stages. Their persuasion is logical and follows the empirical evidence to the highest chance of statistical success. Equipped with this, creative strategy can not only be authentic but can have a better chance of persuading your team to the value of the idea.


Good ideas do not speak for themselves. The concept that a “eureka” moment will dawn on you and your entire team will all agree immediately goes against the value of peer review.The idea should be torn apart, deliberated, compromised, and rebuilt with the different perspectives and insights of your peers. But, if you support yourself with relevant data you will compliment your logical and creative aspects to support your strategy.


Creativity is the connection of existing knowledge in a way that has not been done before. Integrating the logical nature of data analysis allows you to see new connections in interesting ways and bring value and depth to your ideas to contribute to the bottom line.


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BUSINESS BUZZWORD MARKET ANALYSIS 12.19.16 - Investors Buz

BUSINESS BUZZWORD MARKET ANALYSIS 12.19.16 - Investors Buz | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
BUSINESS BUZZWORD MARKET ANALYSIS  12.19.16 A DAILY SOCIAL TRADING EVENT MARKET ANALYSIS  12.16.16 Equities in Canada’s biggest marketplace managed to stay positive by the closing bell on Monday, as health-care concerns performed strongly. The market was also cheered by smartphone whiz BlackBerry on exciting news. The S&P/TSX Composite finished off its highs of the day Monday, but took on 20.24 points to 15,272.44 The Canadian dollar dropped 0.73 cents to 74.53 cents U.S. Health-care rumbled ahead, with Valeant Pharmaceuticals Inc jumping 67 cents, or 3.6% to $19.52, and Concordi

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Investors Buz  from  Spiral Leader .
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Thinking Like a Leader: Three Big Shifts

Thinking Like a Leader: Three Big Shifts | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

Adopt a leadership mind-set before you try to lead.


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Thinking Like a Leader: Three Big Shifts  -   */S.Y\   Leadership's Secret is Find New Paradigm for Development.
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Authentic Leadership Rediscovered

Authentic Leadership Rediscovered | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

In the last 10 years, authenticity has become the gold standard of leadership. This is a sea change from 2003 when I wrote Authentic Leadership. Back then, many people asked what it meant to be authentic. Authentic Leadership was intended as a clarion call to the new generation to learn from negative examples like Enron, WorldCom and Tyco. In it, I defined authentic leaders as genuine, moral and character-based leaders: "People of the highest integrity, committed to building enduring organizations … who have a deep sense of purpose and are true to their core values who have the courage to build their companies to meet the needs of all their stakeholders, and who recognize the importance of their service to society."


Via The Learning Factor
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This enables them to become more effective as leaders. This approach is similar to Stanford’s Carol Dweck's “growth mindset.” - */S.Y\ The Evolution of Leader . A Permanent Creativity give " Things of Perfection", the Application of They born Smart Transformation / New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom. This is New Level of Knowledge.
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, November 19, 2015 8:31 PM

Is becoming an "authentic leader" just an excuse for practicing a rigid management style? Bill George, who pioneered the idea, says critics don't understand what constitutes an authentic leader.

Bettina Thompson's curator insight, November 20, 2015 7:26 PM

Enduring principles, endure for a reason :)

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Sara Jenkins teaches you how to prepare overseas the Italian Porchetta at home

Sara Jenkins teaches you how to prepare overseas  the Italian Porchetta at home | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

It is best to get a pork shoulder with the fat and skin still on. This is usually a special order at a butcher shop, but it is worth it to see if your butcher can do this.  The skin is an important crispy, delicious part of the final dish. [...]
Ingredients

1 4-pound boneless pork shoulder with the fat cap and skin still on or a 4-pound pork shoulder and a separate pork belly20 fresh sage leaves3 leafy sprigs fresh thyme, leaves removed3 leafy sprigs rosemary, stemmed2 garlic cloves, peeled and roughly chopped 2 tablespoons fennel pollen (swap out for dried fennel if you can't get this)1 ½ teaspoons medium coarse sea salt 1 ½ teaspoons freshly cracked black pepper* optional:  I like to add a couple of tablespoons of lemon zest to the herbs because really like lemon with pork. 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil½ cup dry white wine
Directions

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*/S.Y\ The Italian Porchetta  as Food  for  Intensive Work . 
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'Bones' is back: Here's why you should be excited

After what's been one of the longest midseason hiatus periods ever, Bones is officially back

But the wait for the show's return is going to be well worth it

Executive producer Stephen Nathan and star Emily Deschanel gave Mashable a bunch of scoop for what Nathan is calling "Season 10, 2.0," and all of it promises heaps of drama and fun

In short: there's a big pregnancy, a big problem, and a big load of cash.

For details, check out the gallery below

Bones airs Thursdays at 8 p.m. ET on FOX.

Have something to add to this story? Share it in the comments. Read more...

More about Television, Entertainment, Tv, and Bones

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More about Television, Entertainment, Tv, and Bones .  -   */S.Y\ Bones,  Season 2 , Episode 19 .  How Health of Bones  limit   of interstellar space travel .
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If You're Serious About Ideas, Get Serious About Blogging

If You're Serious About Ideas, Get Serious About Blogging | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

Highlights:

Writing is still the best medium for demonstrating expertise on the web.Indeed, if you want to shape public opinion, you need to be the one creating the narrative.If you create high-quality content, you legitimately may become a source as powerful and trusted as the "legacy media.But there's reason to believe that serious (high-quality, idea-focused) competition in the blogging world is likely to wane in the future, further increasing your impact.Writing is still the clearest and most definitive medium for demonstrating expertise on the web.
Via marketingIO
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Indeed, if you want to shape public opinion, you need to be the one creating the narrative.  -  */S.Y\  Business Intelligence: New Mindsight from Thought Leader can realize New Business Decisions for SME's.
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marketingIO's curator insight, December 21, 2012 8:52 PM

See the article at blogs.hbr.org.


Receive a daily summary of The Marketing Automation Alert directly to your inbox. Subscribe here (your privacy is protected). If you like this scoop, please share by using the links below.

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Why Being The Most Connected Is A Vanity Metric

Why Being The Most Connected Is A Vanity Metric | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
Research shows that being the most connected person is not an effective way to build your network. The single best strategy is one that almost no one talks about.
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"Capital is the byproduct of having the right mindset and addressing the right issue and challenges." Nate Morris - */S.Y\ The Right Mindset born Best Business Decisions for SME's .
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What's next for the shared value movement? | Devex

What's next for the shared value movement? | Devex | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
Michael Porter, the Bishop William Lawrence university professor at Harvard Business School. Photo by: Nestlé / CC BY-NC-SA

The concept of shared value was around 150 years ago but it somehow got lost along the way as the idea of a corporation evolved. But now, the shared value movement is looking at how to bring those concepts back into the way of doing business and, in doing so, help achieve key development goals.

It’s not an easy path and barriers remain, particularly around measurement and getting the necessary buy-in from all actors, but there has been significant progress in recent years.

Michael Porter, the Bishop William Lawrence university professor at Harvard Business School who helped bring the term to life with his 2006 paper, is also now working on another project, one that may help tackle the metrics challenge.

Porter has been working on the Social Progress Index, which is a framework for measuring the multiple dimensions of social progress, rather than relying solely on economic measures such as gross domestic product.

“Aid cutoffs don’t necessarily map to the kind of progress that we really hope societies will make,” he said. “We argue that you can’t use economic measures as a proxy for societal progress. We actually have to measure societal progress directly and understand its dimensionality.”

Devex Impact recently sat down with Michael Porter to talk to him about the importance of measuring social progress, what’s needed and what’s next for shared value. Here is an excerpt from that conversation.

Tell me a little bit about your work with the Social Progress Index, what your goals are with that project and how it can tie in with your work on shared value?

What we would hope is when we think about aid, when we think about development, we’ll think about it in this granular way of topic by topic, issue by issue, dimension by dimension, rather than this kind of simplistic thing that once you reach this GDP per capita, you don’t get aid anymore or you don’t get help or you’re viewed as succeeding.

I think we’re starting to get this glimmer that if you don’t look at social progress carefully you actually will not succeed in economic development. There is a deep interplay between moving [economic institutions, actors and policies] in the right direction and building this sort of societal and community foundation if you will, and we don’t have enough data to actually be able to study that rigorously yet because many of the social indicators that we are using and tracking really have only been available for a few years. We don’t have time series yet, but we’re getting lots of glimpses that are telling us that if the social agenda does not advance rapidly enough the economic agenda will stall. This is just a whole new order.

Twenty years from now the study of economic development will be deeply embedded in these kinds of ideas. We’ve come to this kind of notion that really inclusive development is economic development plus social progress and if we add those two together then we have … a robust idea of what inclusive development really means.

I think what the shared value movement is starting to do is give the private sector a much clearer rationale for why they should be playing [a fundamental role in moving a lot of these agendas along].

The social responsibility rationale was well meaning and I think people could talk about it but ultimately it was distinct from the business … the shared value idea is opening up business thinking to participating in development but not out of sort of being good citizens but out of the fact that there is truly shared value for them.

What do you see as some of the critical barriers to wider adoption of the shared value concept? What’s needed?

What we’ve found so far in this work is ... you actually have to make it real. You need examples that are close enough to a company’s own space or what it does that people start to see this isn’t some theory. It’s very exciting when you can start to do a little bit of thinking about a particular field and then all of a sudden the opportunities proliferate.

I think you talk to business people and they’ll listen to this, they’ll nod their head, [say] I get it, I agree with it. They love talking about this as opposed to philanthropy and [corporate social responsibility]. This makes sense to them, they can connect it to what they’re supposed to do in the business but it’s still a leap to understand how to apply it, so we’re putting a lot of energy on that now.

Ultimately one of the big problems we’re having in shared value is measurement. You can measure the economic side pretty easily but what is harder to measure is the social impact that you’re having.

One of the biggest issues we have with companies and shared value and measurement is there’s almost a sense in which companies don’t want to talk about the economic benefits of social impact. There’s this idea that’s sort of grown up in I think less informed circles that actually making a profit is somehow bad and if we’re doing something and making a profit it must not be worthy and therefore companies don’t connect the dots.

We have to legitimize in the private sector the idea that you should not only be willing to but also be proactive in measuring the actual social impact you’re having in a particular area, rather than just talking about how much money you gave or how many volunteers you had.

What do you see as the role of the development community in creating more shared value partnerships or strategies?

I don’t know if there is a big meeting in the world of the traditional development community, but if there is I’d like to go. ... We have to get the development community to be willing to take a fresh look at not only development itself but also at the best mechanisms and models to achieve it. One of the … key ideas in shared value is that if you are operating on a … traditional philanthropy, giving or aid model, it’s not that you can’t do a lot of good and move societies along. But at least for many of the problems development has to achieve, that is just an extraordinarily expensive and not scalable solution.

If [there’s] anything that businesses are good at, it’s scalability and delivering services on a large scale, and we need to get the traditional development community to look at business in a different way. I didn’t use the word trust business, I just said look at business in a different way and see a different kind of potential. It’s literally just a mindset thing.

We’ve seen some leaders in the NGO community just achieve awesome progress when they can say: If we really care about water, let’s talk to Nestle; if we really care about agriculture in Africa, let’s talk to Unilever.

The perspective in the business community is probably moving now pretty rapidly because first, business is tired of being criticized [and] hassled, tired of being blamed, and I think we’re ready to move beyond the CSR model. I think in the traditional NGO and development community there is still a far more mixed view of whether business is good or bad or evil or OK or might be a partner or might not.

There’s lots of businesses who have done awful or rotten things throughout history but that doesn’t mean that that’s where we’re going.

You talk about the goal of shared value being embedded into the way corporations act. Do you think that will mean that the term will at some point become obsolete because it will just be the way of doing business?

Hopefully you won’t need to talk about shared value. We didn’t have shared value 150 years ago when most companies sort of instinctively did this.

My mind is drawn to Japan. Japan had a devastating war, just like a lot of other countries did, and who rebuilt Japan? It was companies — they created the food supply. They created the housing. They created the electric power. At its best, capitalism is this marvelous engine for meeting human needs, but I think over time the conception of the company narrowed in a way.

Maybe we won’t need to use the phrase [in future], but right now it’s still very helpful because with businesses, so many of them don’t think about the question of is this project actually good for the consumer? Is this way of doing something actually benefiting the community? So I think we’re still going to need that question for some years to come.

The other thing I would say, because I still fight it a lot, and this comes more from the economics community and people that do theory, that shared value is rare and mostly there are trade-offs. So there’s this big intellectual debate about just how big are the trade-offs and how big is the shared value.

I wrote this little paper about 20 years ago that said that improving environmental performance actually wasn’t inconsistent with improving efficiency and profitability, and I had a thousand arrows in my back. Now a lot of people believe that we can improve the environment, [that it’s] a good thing for us and we’ll be more efficient, we’ll use less resources, we’ll need less packaging, we won’t have as many truck hours. So I think the environment area has been sort of beaten down and the notion now is that there is a lot of shared value opportunity in the environment.

It does seem that there is an easier case for shared value in the environment or energy sectors, but aren’t there some issues, particularly certain social issues, where there just isn’t shared value or a role for business?

Collectively, the development community and business and those of us who work sort of on the intersection [need] to kind of confront those things one after another. I am stunned mostly by the opposite. I am stunned that you’re in Cambodia and you have all these unskilled farmers and they all need help in terms of irrigation, equipment and seeds, and out pops a business model for how somebody can actually meet those needs and do it profitably.

I’m also intrigued by social impact bonds and things like that, which are sort of capitalization structures that really enable you to create a business model not in the short run by selling something today, but by actually getting some of the savings you create. If you take the last five to 10 years, there’s been massive innovation in thinking about how we might attack these development problems in a different way.

We’re at the very frontier of where this whole thing is going and I think we’ve got the parties at the table and they’re dancing. Some stuff is really working and other stuff we’re still learning, and clearly there are areas right now that we can’t see how to deal with except … essentially with subsidy and with income transfers.

I’ve wanted to see the aid community and the philanthropy community start to reward development people ... for outcomes, and again I think that’s kind of an intermediate step. I think it’s kind of a way station. If all of a sudden we could start to measure the outcomes … and then start to learn what were good ways … of doing it, then it’s not too big a jump usually to come up with a different kind of business model.

What do you still want to know about shared value and measuring social impact? What would you ask Michael Porter?

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About the author
Adva saldinger devex
Adva Saldinger
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As a Devex Impact reporter, Adva covers the intersection of business and international development. Previously, she has worked as a reporter at newspapers in both the US and South Africa. Most recently, she has been ghostwriting a memoir for James Kofi Annan, a former child slave and NGO founder in Ghana.

Via Dr Lendy Spires
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:
Harry S. Truman is recorded as saying: It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit. – */S.Y\ Transformation of Thought Leader give New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom. Best Business Decision for SME’s.
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The No. 1 Habit of Highly Creative People

The No. 1 Habit of Highly Creative People | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

Creativity is a nebulous, murky topic that fascinates me endlessly — how does it work? What habits to creative people do that makes them so successful at creativity?

I’ve reflected on my own creative habits, but decided I’d look at the habits that others consider important to their creativity. I picked a handful of creatives, almost at random — there are so many that picking the best would be impossible, so I just picked some that I admire, who came to mind when I thought of the word “creative”.

This was going to be a list of their creative habits … but in reviewing their lists, and my own habits, I found one that stood out. And it stands out if you review the habits and quotes from great creative people in history.

It’s the Most Important Habit when it comes to creativity.

After you read the No. 1 habit, please scroll down and read the No. 2 habit — they might seem contradictory but in my experience, you can’t really hit your creative stride until you find a way to balance both habits.

The No. 1 Creativity Habit
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Sergey Yatsenko's insight:
Habit of Highly Creative People. - */S.Y\ A Permanent Creativity give " Things of Perfection", the Application of They born Smart Transformation / New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom. This is New Level of Knowledge.
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