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Meet the social media leaders who will show you how to shake up your social strategy

At The Social Shake-Up on May 22-24, 2017, speakers from Coca-Cola, Atlanta Hawks, American Cancer Society, IBM, Arby's, Ernst & Young, Carter's and Cox will share out-of-the-ordinary social media successes.
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:
*/S.Y\  New Media Symbiosis. This is the Positive Effect of Interaction in Social Media / Facebook, Twitter, Scoop.it, LinkedIn, About me, SlideShare, Viadeo, .../.
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Keys for a Successful Digital Transformation via Eric Sheninger

Keys for a Successful Digital Transformation via Eric Sheninger | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
A blog about digital leadership, pedagogy, learning, and transformative change in education.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Keys for a Successful Digital Transformation - */S.Y\ Transformation of Thought Leader give New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom and the Evolution on Content. Power Score is a Fuction of Your Permanent Creativity .
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Conduct a Content Analysis in 3 Easy Steps

Conduct a Content Analysis in 3 Easy Steps | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
One of the biggest challenges that content marketers face is reporting ROI. Very rarely is success easy to measure: your blog readers will often take numer
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:
*/S.Y\    Transformation of Thought Leader give New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom and the Evolution on Content.
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20 Characteristics of a Successful Solopreneur

20 Characteristics of a Successful Solopreneur | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
Recognizing some of the traits will help you to know yourself a little better and work better with other solopreneurs.
Via Enzo Calamo
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:
3. Creativity.  -  */S.Y\  Determine Your Format of Creativity for Development with New Mindset. New Products & Services for Consumers.
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The Incredible Technology Behind Bitcoin Is About To Change The World

The Incredible Technology Behind Bitcoin Is About To Change The World | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
Bitcoin has crashed, and it may well crash again. But that doesn't matter.

Via fred park
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:
The World is Changing .  -    */S.Y\  The Modern World has Index of Transformation. QR - Codes, Cellular, Cryptocurrency , ... ext.
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fred park's curator insight, March 16, 2015 2:11 AM

We have known this for a while.

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Inside Forbes: Introducing the Follow Bar, News Navigation for the Era of Social Media - Forbes

Inside Forbes: Introducing the Follow Bar, News Navigation for the Era of Social Media - Forbes | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
For 95 years, FORBES has been about entrepreneurial capitalism. That clear, unwavering mission is at the core of our exciting new platform.

Via Brian Steffens
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:
"The best entrepreneurs always have been and always will be problem solvers." Richard Branson  -  */S.Y\  Law of Social Media. POSITIVE SOCIAL INTERACTIONS give the Growth of Your Social Media. A Permanent Creativity born Real Interest & New Connections of Users in Network.
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Digital Publishing: Developing a Proper Social Media Strategy with Twitter

Digital Publishing: Developing a Proper Social Media Strategy with Twitter | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

Via Brian Steffens
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Digital Publishing: Developing a Proper Social Media Strategy with Twitter - */S.Y\ Shareability on Twitter is best way for New Understanding of A Permanent Creativity.
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Why is Microsoft buying LinkedIn for $26.2bn? CEO Satya Nadella explains

Why is Microsoft buying LinkedIn for $26.2bn? CEO Satya Nadella explains | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
Microsoft just announced that it is buying LinkedIn, the professional social network, for a whopping $26.
Via Geek Hibrid
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Why is Microsoft buying LinkedIn for  $26.2bn?!  -  */S.Y\ Microsoft  understand the importance of Social Media /Next Level / for the Future .
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God: Personification ≠ Person

God: Personification ≠ Person | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
God is a personification, not a person -- an undeniable interpretation, not an otherworldly tyrant. If we fail to grasp this, we cannot possibly understand religion or religious differences.

Via Don Berg
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*/S.Y\ Personification of Spiral Leader for New Media is Real Way for Development in the World .
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Don Berg's curator insight, September 17, 2015 7:21 PM

I suspect that most of the people that know me would not have any objection to this idea, but I am wondering if there are some few of you who do. I am curious and welcome your comments, even if you wanted to make them privately. I promise that I am not interested in changing your mind, I just want to know if anyone finds it objectionable or difficult or just off in some way.

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Thought Leadership Is The New Strategy For Corporate Growth

Thought Leadership Is The New Strategy For Corporate Growth | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

Business growth can be enabled in many ways, yet most corporations still focus on the most traditional ways – whether sales, new products, new markets, new brands, mergers and acquisitions, etc. What many corporations don’t seem to value and/or understand is the power of knowledge sharing. Let’s face it, we are all being challenged to deal with change management in every aspect of our business and no one has all of the answers that the 21st century global market has presented us with. As such, this represents a unique opportunity for corporations and their leaders to cross pollinate knowledge with clients and strategic partners to enable growth and innovation through the power of thought leadership.

 

Thought leadership is clearly a different type of growth strategy for corporations. Consulting and service companies – such as McKinsey, PwC, Deloitte, IBM and others – have been at the forefront of thought leadership. Corporations must now begin to assess, package and share their own best practices, knowledge-sets, case studies and highly skilled and talented leaders to serve as value-added resources to fuel business growth.

 

Corporations that embrace thought leadership as a strategy for growth represent the essence of market leadership, corporate accountability and changing the rules of client engagement.  It requires an organization to share what it is known for — the hallmark of its brand reputation — by being transparent about its best practices and sharing them with clients. It requires its leadership to let go of the past and focus on the present for the betterment of its future and that of its clients. It requires a corporation to think differently about industry standards and accept that the traditional ways of doing things may no longer be as relevant as they once were – and collaborate with clients to solve for the future together. Thought leadership is about introducing new ways of thinking that will reinvent industries and significantly impact business models, the marketplace, employees, consumers and the workplace.

 

Today’s corporate leaders must be potent pioneers — blazing new paths few would go down and having the courage to see them all the way through to the end. To be a pioneer, you need to trust yourself enough to share the unique ways that you think as a thought leader, continually testing your constructively disruptive ideas and ideals. Beyond business growth, thought leadership can fuel growth and opportunities for employee engagement and infuse excitement back into a workplace culture. Employees want their executives to be more vocal in sharing their perspectives about the future. They want leaders that are proactive about informing them of what’s upon the horizon so they can prepare themselves for what’s next and contribute in more meaningful and purposeful ways. Employees have grown tired of the next PowerPoint presentation and want to know more about their executive leaders – who they are as people and what really drives their thinking. Employees want their leaders to know that they are just as aware of change management requirements for growth as their leaders. Employees want more cross pollination of sharing since everyone sees the business through a different lens – and this is when diversity of thought can be a breakthrough.

 

It’s time for corporations to showcase their executives as thought leaders that can strengthen client and supply chain relationships by discovering new ways to make things better in order to grow better together. Diversity of thought is undervalued and misunderstood because people just want to hear themselves talk about what they believe are the right solutions – rather than being more open-minded to embrace new perspectives, regardless of hierarchy or rank. This is why there are so many self-proclaimed thought leaders inside of corporations who are not being taken seriously enough and who associate themselves with leeches and loafers rather than lifters and leaders. These are the leaders that are too disruptive and make it difficult for change management to happen with the required clarity and alignment of thought.

 

Strategic growth requires a deep understanding of what a company is great at doing and identifying those developmental areas that will allow – it to optimally flourish. Yes, you can hire consultants to solve your problems – but they should now play an even more hands-on facilitation role where they can help youconnect the dots, see them more clearly and understand the opportunities for growth within each interconnection point – as you seek to build more holistic relationships with your clients who share your vision, best practices and strategic plans for your future. In a world fueled with change, high-touch, high-trust and highly collaborative relationships are in order.  Be more strategic and collaborative about how you engage in the process of change and the role that knowledge sharing plays.

 

As you begin to use thought leadership as a strategy for business growth and innovation, here are seven questions that will get you started as your organization continues its transformation process during this time of change management.

 

1.  What Do You Solve For?

 

Know what your organization can solve for most effectively and showcase your solution-sets. The changing landscape of the marketplace has made it more difficult for organizations to identify what they are great at solving for – both internally with their employees and externally with clients and supply chain partners.

You have existing clients and business development prospects that can greatly benefit from the competencies and capabilities that you can offer. Allow thought leadership to overcome the traps associated with the dangers of complacency that can lead to the commoditization of your business. Stop being order takers and allow thought leadership to provide a value-added component to your business model that strengthens your marketplace reputation and makes your client relationships more profitable.

 

2.  Who Are the Game Changers?

 

Those leaders in your organization that are applying new ways of thinking to propel growth, innovation and opportunity are the game changers. They are the ones that intimately know the mechanics involved with each line of business, trends, recent challenges, competitive pressures and where the growth opportunities exist. Game changers represent those in your innovation lab that champion ideas and fuel new thinking.

 

They are not afraid to change the conversation  as corporate entrepreneurs and constructive disruptors  that seek to change paradigms, challenge the status quo and enhance  existing business models and client relationships.

 

3.  What Are the Most Impactful Best Practices?

 

Existing best practices are the protocols and methods used to operate more efficiently and effectively. These operating methodologies and frameworks transcend time and new marketplace demands.

 

Based on your clients, lines of business and industry change management requirements – how can your best practices fuel growth for your business when shared and implemented with your clients. Talking about your best practices is a conversation you should be well-prepared to have, making it less likely you’ll be blindsided because you didn’t think through all the issues. You might even own a subject matter that could reinvent your industry.

 

4.  Where Are the Subject Matter Experts (SME)?

 

Identify the experts of your business and those people that have witnessed transformation over the years and have implemented proven solutions. Don’t get them confused with the game changers;  these are the ones that touch the business and every aspect of it, every day. They are the leaders that have lived the long history of client relationships and know their counterparts in the industry you serve. They have become experts as a result of their experience and in many cases are known as the thought leaders in your company.

 

Subject matter experts are the go-to knowledge resource and they are the ones that can guide growth strategies and provide the best recommendations for implementation. They know where the traps exist and what has historically worked and not worked in the past – and the present.

 

5.  What Are the Innovative Breakthroughs?

 

Identify the innovative breakthroughs that made your organization stronger and that allow you to serve your clients better.  What are the new technologies introduced and strategic investments made that your business and your clients have benefited from?

 

Many times there are breakthroughs in an organization that are not viewed as such – but that your clients and industry would benefit from. Always be mindful of the new ways you are thinking and how you are moving the business forward. Don’t assume that others wouldn’t see it as an innovation. Leverage every innovation for the betterment of your organization, its people, brand and client relations. You don’t always need to compare yourself to innovators like Google, Samsung and Apple. Breakthroughs come in all shapes and sizes. The key is that your breakthrough can be measured and shared with your clients to propel growth and opportunity.

 

6.  Where Do the Real Relationships Exist?

 

Assess the relationships that are demonstrating real value and that stimulate growth, innovation and opportunity. Like breakthroughs, the best relationships come in different shapes and sizes. Some relationships are cost centers, others are profit centers.

 

Not all client relationships are fully optimized because it takes time to see beyond the most obvious opportunities.  It’s difficult to explore the opportunities for abundance with clients when your portfolio of products and services may only represent the surface of what your corporation is fully capable of delivering.

 

The key is to know which relationships are adding value to your brand, products, services and people. Evaluate your supply chain and the strategic partnerships embedded throughout the chain. Once you have identified them, share your success stories, the best practices they helped you create, the impact on employee morale, a new client relationship, the new ways you approached and set-forth the standard for building relationships and the role they play to fuel growth of your business.

 

7.  What Are the Desired Outcomes?

 

Explore your current revenue streams and the parts of your business that generate the desired outcomes after you have identified the aforementioned points 1 – 6. Corporate growth strategies are about driving real measureable and sustainable results that impact the bottom line. The investment in corporate growth can be costly and risky. This is why it is so important to discover new ways to capture growth through strategic knowledge sharing / thought leadership that makes your corporation stand out from the crowd.

 

Thought leadership allows you and your clients to broaden each other’s observations of what’s possible to cultivate expansive innovation – and through this process create greater strategic focus to determine the most probable opportunities to seize the greatest potential in the relationship. The result: you realize the power that is inherent by sharing the momentum of the success and significance that you are both capable of creating with one another.

 

Remember this: we are transitioning from a knowledge based to a wisdom based economy. It’s no longer about what you know – but what you do with what you know. In the wisdom based economy, it’s always about trust, transparency and collaboration. A client relationship is about adding value in everything you do and how you do it.  Everyone wants to grow during this time of uncertainty where many are reinventing themselves to find their footing – you must position your organization and its leaders as catalysts for growth through thought leadership.

 

 


Via GrowFL
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

Identify the experts of your business and those people that have witnessed transformation over the years and have implemented proven solutions. Don’t get them confused with the game changers;  these are the ones that touch the business and every aspect of it, every day. They are the leaders that have lived the long history of client relationships and know their counterparts in the industry you serve. They have become experts as a result of their experience and in many cases are known as the thought leaders in your company.   -   */S.Y\   All need TRANSFORMATION / People, Companies, Country,../ . How realize TRANSFORMATION for New Development !?

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24 Creativity Quotes to Bring Out Your Inner Artist

24 Creativity Quotes to Bring Out Your Inner Artist | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
It's tough to be creative day-in and day-out, but as a creative professional you may not have a choice. Use these 24 creativity quotes to inspire yourself.

Via Douglas Eby
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

“Don’t think. Thinking is the enemy of creativity. It’s self-conscious, and anything self-conscious is lousy. You can’t try to do things. You simply must do things” – Ray Bradbury.  */S.Y\ A Permanent Creativity  give "Things of Perfection",The Real Application of They born Smart Transformation / New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom/.

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Assessing Creativity

February 2013 | Volume 70 | Number 5
Creativity Now! Pages 28-34

 

Assessing Creativity--Susan M. Brookhart

 

 

We can assess creativity—and, in the process, help students become more creative.

Fifth graders were busy writing acrostic poems on small posters. One girl wrote a school spirit poem, with the first letter of each line spelling out the school name: S for "super," N for "nice," and so on. She even drew a picture of a bobcat (pictures were not required) that was a spot-on replication of the school mascot. A boy wrote an acrostic poem with the first letter of each line spelling out his name: A for "agressive" (unfortunately spelled incorrectly); N for "nutty"; and so on. No picture.

So what kind of feedback did the teacher give? Her comments gave students the impression that the girl's poem was perfect and that the boy's poem was not so good, mostly because of that one misspelled word and the fact that his lines sloped downward on the poster.

This assignment was a giant missed opportunity for both students. The girl's work was a skillful replication of things she'd seen before. All the words were simple, the school spirit theme was a common one, and the point of her drawing was to duplicate the school mascot. She needed to know that her work was proficient—but she also needed to be challenged to work with more originality when writing poems. She only received half that feedback.

The boy's work was more original. Although the poem was only five lines long, it gave readers a real sense of who he was—or, at least, how he saw himself. He needed to know that he had used a prescribed format creatively—but he also needed to be challenged to check his spelling and use a ruler to make straight lines of text on posters. He, too, only received half that feedback.

What was missing in the teacher's feedback is easy to diagnose—her criteria for success were too limited—but it's harder to put right. Can creativity be an assessment category? If so, how do you handle it? Surely you wouldn't downgrade the girl's perfectly good poem, beautifully and dutifully written and presented.

Here's how to assess and give feedback about creativity and, in the process, help students become more creative in their work.

What Is Creativity?

Creativity is a simple concept that can be difficult to get your head around. In its most basic sense, creative means "original and of high quality" (Perkins, 1981, p. 6). The girl's school spirit poem was of high quality, but it was workmanlike and derivative. The boy's self-analysis poem was original, and the poetic composition and word choice were fine; he just needed to attend to the quality of the mechanics. Of course, a poem that is uninterpretable or meaningless, no matter how original, can't be creative.

What does it look like when schoolwork is original and of high quality? Probably the foremost characteristic of creative students is that they put things together in new ways (Brookhart, 2010). For example, while writing a poem about a sunset, a student who observes that moment when the sunset looks very much like a sunrise and makes the connection to other endings that can also foreshadow beginnings is more creative than a student who describes that moment as "red and fiery."

Students who are able to put things together in new ways can observe things others might miss, construct more novel products, give more novel performances, use more unusual or unconventional imagery to make points, observe ordinary things and find in them an area to wonder about or a problem to solve, and the like.

Not all schoolwork, even performance assessments, supports this sort of thinking. Before you can assess creativity, you need to make sure that the tasks you set for students are conducive to creativity.

Stimulating Creative Thinking

Myriad opportunities for fostering creativity are right under our noses in school, because learning is a generative act. However, what's missing in many classrooms is deliberately noticing and naming opportunities for creativity when they occur, giving feedback on the creative process, and teaching students that creativity is a valued quality.

Brainstorming in any subject can be a creative activity. Elementary teachers who ask students to begin the writing process with a graphic organizer, list, or outline can give feedback on the originality of the ideas as well as their suitability for the writing assignment. For example, an elementary teacher might ask students to list several farm animals, imagine a funny situation that might happen to each, and then pick one animal and write a story about it.

Science teachers who have students brainstorm a list of hypotheses to test can give feedback on the originality of ideas as well as their suitability for the experiment that the students will design. For example, a teacher might mention that her coffee cools too quickly in the cup and then ask students to brainstorm a list of things that might slow down the cooling process, write a hypothesis about each one, and design an experiment to test one hypothesis.

Assignments that require students to produce new ideas or reorganize existing ideas in a new way are likely to foster student creativity. In mathematics, asking students to identify a problem for which multiplication would be useful in finding the solution requires more creativity from them than giving students a multiplication word problem to solve. Similarly, in music, an assignment in which students write an original melody requires more creativity than one in which they analyze a preexisting melody.

Assignments that require students to put two things together are also likely to promote creativity. For example, in English language arts, asking students to write or speak about how The Adventures of Tom Sawyer would have been different had Huckleberry Finn been the main character sparks more creativity than asking students to discuss the character of Tom Sawyer. In social studies, asking students how the events that led up to World War I might be handled if they happened today fosters more creativity than asking students to discuss the causes of World War I.

Students will still exhibit a range of originality and quality in their work, even in response to these more creative prompts. Teachers can give feedback on both of these aspects of the work.

Sometimes teachers and students think that any assignment that allows student choice is conducive to creativity. Although that may be true in general, only assignments that allow student choice in matters related to what the student is supposed to learn develop student creativity in the area under study. For example, if you ask students to compare characters in two novels and allow them to choose the characters or novels, they have the opportunity to develop creativity in their approach to literary criticism. However, if you ask students to compare two specified characters and just give them choices about whether they want to write an essay, give a speech, or write a song, students will not have that opportunity.

Criteria for Creativity

Creativity is not a synonym for clever, humorous, artistically pleasing, enthusiastic, or persuasive. Those are all great qualities that we can assess in their own right, but we shouldn't confuse them with creativity. As early childhood educator Lilian Katz once railed, "Creativity is not animals with long eyelashes!"

Rather, criteria for creativity should match what we expect in creative work: originality and high quality. Creative students

Recognize the importance of a deep knowledge base and continually work to learn new things.Are open to new ideas and actively seek them out.Find source material in a wide variety of media, people, and events.Organize and reorganize ideas into different categories or combinations and then evaluate whether the results are interesting, new, or helpful.Use trial and error when they are unsure how to proceed, viewing failure as an opportunity to learn. (Brookhart, 2010, pp. 128–129)

 

The first four characteristics lead to qualities in the work that we can observe, assess, and provide feedback on. For example, are the source materials varied? Are ideas organized in a fresh way and uniquely suited to the problem or product? The last characteristic—using trial and error—is about the student's approach to learning and may or may not show itself in the finished work.

A Rubric for Creativity

If all of these first four characteristics are in play in an assignment, then a rubric like the one in Figure 1 (p. 31) may support teachers and students in assessing creativity (Brookhart, 2013). The rubric describes four levels of creativity—very creative, creative, ordinary/routine, and imitative—in four different areas—variety of ideas, variety of sources, novelty of idea combinations, and novelty of communication.

Read more: http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/feb13/vol70/num05/Assessing-Creativity.aspx


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Recognize the importance of a deep knowledge base and continually work to learn new things.
Are open to new ideas and actively seek them out.
Find source material in a wide variety of media, people, and events.
Organize and reorganize ideas into different categories or combinations and then evaluate whether the results are interesting, new, or helpful. */S.Y\ A Permanent Creativity is the Best Quality for Leader with New Opportunities for Business.

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Lawmakers hear mixed message on limiting spectrum bidding | ComputerWorld.com

Lawmakers hear mixed message on limiting spectrum bidding | ComputerWorld.com | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission should limit the amount of spectrum that giant mobile carriers AT&T and Verizon Communications are able to buy in an auction scheduled for mid-2015, some U.S. senators said Tuesday.

 

But lawmakers could reach no consensus on proposals to limit the bids of the two largest mobile carriers in the U.S. in the upcoming auction of spectrum now controlled by television stations. Some Republican senators, along with an AT&T representative and other witnesses, including an AT&T official, called for unrestricted bidding in the mid-2015 auction of 600MHz spectrum.

 

"The FCC should let all interested participants freely compete against one other in the open market," Sen. John Thune, a South Dakota Republican, said during a Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee hearing. "It should avoid putting its thumb on the scales. The value of using spectrum auctions is that the free market is more effective at allocating spectrum than relying on the subjective opinions and predictions of government officials."

 

Thune and Joan Marsh, AT&T's vice president of federal regulatory affairs, urged the FCC to reject calls by carriers Sprint and T-Mobile USA, along with the U.S. Department of Justice and some other advocates, to cap the amount of spectrum the two largest carriers can buy. In the so-called incentive auction, TV stations would volunteer to give up prime spectrum for mobile broadband services in exchange for a cut of the auction proceeds.

 

T-Mobile and Sprint, through recent mergers, have become stronger competitors and don't need the FCC's help, Marsh told senators.

 

"An open auction is the fairest method to assign licenses because it ensures that all applicants have the same opportunity to obtain spectrum," Marsh said. "An open auction would allow market competition, rather than regulation, to allocate spectrum, ensuring that it is put to its best and highest use."

 

Still, if the FCC decides to cap spectrum purchases, it should do so for all carriers and not just the two largest, Marsh said.

 

Some other witnesses agreed with that approach. The FCC should adopt a "no-piggie rule" that limits any one carrier from buying too much of the available spectrum, said Harold Feld, senior vice president of Public Knowledge and a frequent AT&T critic.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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CEO leadership is needed to push analytics thinking.  -   */S.Y\ Business Intelligence : New Mindsight from Thought Leader can realize New Business Decisions for SME's .

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Thinking Like a Leader: Three Big Shifts

Thinking Like a Leader: Three Big Shifts | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

Adopt a leadership mind-set before you try to lead.


Via bill woodruff
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:
Thinking Like a Leader: Three Big Shifts  -   */S.Y\   Leadership's Secret is Find New Paradigm for Development.
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Authentic Leadership Rediscovered

Authentic Leadership Rediscovered | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

In the last 10 years, authenticity has become the gold standard of leadership. This is a sea change from 2003 when I wrote Authentic Leadership. Back then, many people asked what it meant to be authentic. Authentic Leadership was intended as a clarion call to the new generation to learn from negative examples like Enron, WorldCom and Tyco. In it, I defined authentic leaders as genuine, moral and character-based leaders: "People of the highest integrity, committed to building enduring organizations … who have a deep sense of purpose and are true to their core values who have the courage to build their companies to meet the needs of all their stakeholders, and who recognize the importance of their service to society."


Via The Learning Factor
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:
This enables them to become more effective as leaders. This approach is similar to Stanford’s Carol Dweck's “growth mindset.” - */S.Y\ The Evolution of Leader . A Permanent Creativity give " Things of Perfection", the Application of They born Smart Transformation / New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom. This is New Level of Knowledge.
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, November 19, 2015 8:31 PM

Is becoming an "authentic leader" just an excuse for practicing a rigid management style? Bill George, who pioneered the idea, says critics don't understand what constitutes an authentic leader.

Bettina Thompson's curator insight, November 20, 2015 7:26 PM

Enduring principles, endure for a reason :)

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Sara Jenkins teaches you how to prepare overseas the Italian Porchetta at home

Sara Jenkins teaches you how to prepare overseas  the Italian Porchetta at home | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

It is best to get a pork shoulder with the fat and skin still on. This is usually a special order at a butcher shop, but it is worth it to see if your butcher can do this.  The skin is an important crispy, delicious part of the final dish. [...]
Ingredients

1 4-pound boneless pork shoulder with the fat cap and skin still on or a 4-pound pork shoulder and a separate pork belly20 fresh sage leaves3 leafy sprigs fresh thyme, leaves removed3 leafy sprigs rosemary, stemmed2 garlic cloves, peeled and roughly chopped 2 tablespoons fennel pollen (swap out for dried fennel if you can't get this)1 ½ teaspoons medium coarse sea salt 1 ½ teaspoons freshly cracked black pepper* optional:  I like to add a couple of tablespoons of lemon zest to the herbs because really like lemon with pork. 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil½ cup dry white wine
Directions

Via Mariano Pallottini
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*/S.Y\ The Italian Porchetta  as Food  for  Intensive Work . 
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'Bones' is back: Here's why you should be excited

After what's been one of the longest midseason hiatus periods ever, Bones is officially back

But the wait for the show's return is going to be well worth it

Executive producer Stephen Nathan and star Emily Deschanel gave Mashable a bunch of scoop for what Nathan is calling "Season 10, 2.0," and all of it promises heaps of drama and fun

In short: there's a big pregnancy, a big problem, and a big load of cash.

For details, check out the gallery below

Bones airs Thursdays at 8 p.m. ET on FOX.

Have something to add to this story? Share it in the comments. Read more...

More about Television, Entertainment, Tv, and Bones

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More about Television, Entertainment, Tv, and Bones .  -   */S.Y\ Bones,  Season 2 , Episode 19 .  How Health of Bones  limit   of interstellar space travel .
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If You're Serious About Ideas, Get Serious About Blogging

If You're Serious About Ideas, Get Serious About Blogging | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

Highlights:

Writing is still the best medium for demonstrating expertise on the web.Indeed, if you want to shape public opinion, you need to be the one creating the narrative.If you create high-quality content, you legitimately may become a source as powerful and trusted as the "legacy media.But there's reason to believe that serious (high-quality, idea-focused) competition in the blogging world is likely to wane in the future, further increasing your impact.Writing is still the clearest and most definitive medium for demonstrating expertise on the web.
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Indeed, if you want to shape public opinion, you need to be the one creating the narrative.  -  */S.Y\  Business Intelligence: New Mindsight from Thought Leader can realize New Business Decisions for SME's.
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marketingIO's curator insight, December 21, 2012 8:52 PM

See the article at blogs.hbr.org.


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Why Being The Most Connected Is A Vanity Metric

Why Being The Most Connected Is A Vanity Metric | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
Research shows that being the most connected person is not an effective way to build your network. The single best strategy is one that almost no one talks about.
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"Capital is the byproduct of having the right mindset and addressing the right issue and challenges." Nate Morris - */S.Y\ The Right Mindset born Best Business Decisions for SME's .
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What's next for the shared value movement? | Devex

What's next for the shared value movement? | Devex | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
Michael Porter, the Bishop William Lawrence university professor at Harvard Business School. Photo by: Nestlé / CC BY-NC-SA

The concept of shared value was around 150 years ago but it somehow got lost along the way as the idea of a corporation evolved. But now, the shared value movement is looking at how to bring those concepts back into the way of doing business and, in doing so, help achieve key development goals.

It’s not an easy path and barriers remain, particularly around measurement and getting the necessary buy-in from all actors, but there has been significant progress in recent years.

Michael Porter, the Bishop William Lawrence university professor at Harvard Business School who helped bring the term to life with his 2006 paper, is also now working on another project, one that may help tackle the metrics challenge.

Porter has been working on the Social Progress Index, which is a framework for measuring the multiple dimensions of social progress, rather than relying solely on economic measures such as gross domestic product.

“Aid cutoffs don’t necessarily map to the kind of progress that we really hope societies will make,” he said. “We argue that you can’t use economic measures as a proxy for societal progress. We actually have to measure societal progress directly and understand its dimensionality.”

Devex Impact recently sat down with Michael Porter to talk to him about the importance of measuring social progress, what’s needed and what’s next for shared value. Here is an excerpt from that conversation.

Tell me a little bit about your work with the Social Progress Index, what your goals are with that project and how it can tie in with your work on shared value?

What we would hope is when we think about aid, when we think about development, we’ll think about it in this granular way of topic by topic, issue by issue, dimension by dimension, rather than this kind of simplistic thing that once you reach this GDP per capita, you don’t get aid anymore or you don’t get help or you’re viewed as succeeding.

I think we’re starting to get this glimmer that if you don’t look at social progress carefully you actually will not succeed in economic development. There is a deep interplay between moving [economic institutions, actors and policies] in the right direction and building this sort of societal and community foundation if you will, and we don’t have enough data to actually be able to study that rigorously yet because many of the social indicators that we are using and tracking really have only been available for a few years. We don’t have time series yet, but we’re getting lots of glimpses that are telling us that if the social agenda does not advance rapidly enough the economic agenda will stall. This is just a whole new order.

Twenty years from now the study of economic development will be deeply embedded in these kinds of ideas. We’ve come to this kind of notion that really inclusive development is economic development plus social progress and if we add those two together then we have … a robust idea of what inclusive development really means.

I think what the shared value movement is starting to do is give the private sector a much clearer rationale for why they should be playing [a fundamental role in moving a lot of these agendas along].

The social responsibility rationale was well meaning and I think people could talk about it but ultimately it was distinct from the business … the shared value idea is opening up business thinking to participating in development but not out of sort of being good citizens but out of the fact that there is truly shared value for them.

What do you see as some of the critical barriers to wider adoption of the shared value concept? What’s needed?

What we’ve found so far in this work is ... you actually have to make it real. You need examples that are close enough to a company’s own space or what it does that people start to see this isn’t some theory. It’s very exciting when you can start to do a little bit of thinking about a particular field and then all of a sudden the opportunities proliferate.

I think you talk to business people and they’ll listen to this, they’ll nod their head, [say] I get it, I agree with it. They love talking about this as opposed to philanthropy and [corporate social responsibility]. This makes sense to them, they can connect it to what they’re supposed to do in the business but it’s still a leap to understand how to apply it, so we’re putting a lot of energy on that now.

Ultimately one of the big problems we’re having in shared value is measurement. You can measure the economic side pretty easily but what is harder to measure is the social impact that you’re having.

One of the biggest issues we have with companies and shared value and measurement is there’s almost a sense in which companies don’t want to talk about the economic benefits of social impact. There’s this idea that’s sort of grown up in I think less informed circles that actually making a profit is somehow bad and if we’re doing something and making a profit it must not be worthy and therefore companies don’t connect the dots.

We have to legitimize in the private sector the idea that you should not only be willing to but also be proactive in measuring the actual social impact you’re having in a particular area, rather than just talking about how much money you gave or how many volunteers you had.

What do you see as the role of the development community in creating more shared value partnerships or strategies?

I don’t know if there is a big meeting in the world of the traditional development community, but if there is I’d like to go. ... We have to get the development community to be willing to take a fresh look at not only development itself but also at the best mechanisms and models to achieve it. One of the … key ideas in shared value is that if you are operating on a … traditional philanthropy, giving or aid model, it’s not that you can’t do a lot of good and move societies along. But at least for many of the problems development has to achieve, that is just an extraordinarily expensive and not scalable solution.

If [there’s] anything that businesses are good at, it’s scalability and delivering services on a large scale, and we need to get the traditional development community to look at business in a different way. I didn’t use the word trust business, I just said look at business in a different way and see a different kind of potential. It’s literally just a mindset thing.

We’ve seen some leaders in the NGO community just achieve awesome progress when they can say: If we really care about water, let’s talk to Nestle; if we really care about agriculture in Africa, let’s talk to Unilever.

The perspective in the business community is probably moving now pretty rapidly because first, business is tired of being criticized [and] hassled, tired of being blamed, and I think we’re ready to move beyond the CSR model. I think in the traditional NGO and development community there is still a far more mixed view of whether business is good or bad or evil or OK or might be a partner or might not.

There’s lots of businesses who have done awful or rotten things throughout history but that doesn’t mean that that’s where we’re going.

You talk about the goal of shared value being embedded into the way corporations act. Do you think that will mean that the term will at some point become obsolete because it will just be the way of doing business?

Hopefully you won’t need to talk about shared value. We didn’t have shared value 150 years ago when most companies sort of instinctively did this.

My mind is drawn to Japan. Japan had a devastating war, just like a lot of other countries did, and who rebuilt Japan? It was companies — they created the food supply. They created the housing. They created the electric power. At its best, capitalism is this marvelous engine for meeting human needs, but I think over time the conception of the company narrowed in a way.

Maybe we won’t need to use the phrase [in future], but right now it’s still very helpful because with businesses, so many of them don’t think about the question of is this project actually good for the consumer? Is this way of doing something actually benefiting the community? So I think we’re still going to need that question for some years to come.

The other thing I would say, because I still fight it a lot, and this comes more from the economics community and people that do theory, that shared value is rare and mostly there are trade-offs. So there’s this big intellectual debate about just how big are the trade-offs and how big is the shared value.

I wrote this little paper about 20 years ago that said that improving environmental performance actually wasn’t inconsistent with improving efficiency and profitability, and I had a thousand arrows in my back. Now a lot of people believe that we can improve the environment, [that it’s] a good thing for us and we’ll be more efficient, we’ll use less resources, we’ll need less packaging, we won’t have as many truck hours. So I think the environment area has been sort of beaten down and the notion now is that there is a lot of shared value opportunity in the environment.

It does seem that there is an easier case for shared value in the environment or energy sectors, but aren’t there some issues, particularly certain social issues, where there just isn’t shared value or a role for business?

Collectively, the development community and business and those of us who work sort of on the intersection [need] to kind of confront those things one after another. I am stunned mostly by the opposite. I am stunned that you’re in Cambodia and you have all these unskilled farmers and they all need help in terms of irrigation, equipment and seeds, and out pops a business model for how somebody can actually meet those needs and do it profitably.

I’m also intrigued by social impact bonds and things like that, which are sort of capitalization structures that really enable you to create a business model not in the short run by selling something today, but by actually getting some of the savings you create. If you take the last five to 10 years, there’s been massive innovation in thinking about how we might attack these development problems in a different way.

We’re at the very frontier of where this whole thing is going and I think we’ve got the parties at the table and they’re dancing. Some stuff is really working and other stuff we’re still learning, and clearly there are areas right now that we can’t see how to deal with except … essentially with subsidy and with income transfers.

I’ve wanted to see the aid community and the philanthropy community start to reward development people ... for outcomes, and again I think that’s kind of an intermediate step. I think it’s kind of a way station. If all of a sudden we could start to measure the outcomes … and then start to learn what were good ways … of doing it, then it’s not too big a jump usually to come up with a different kind of business model.

What do you still want to know about shared value and measuring social impact? What would you ask Michael Porter?

Join Devex to network with peers, discover talent and forge new partnerships in international development — it’s free. Then sign up for the Devex Impact newsletter to receive cutting-edge news and analysis at the intersection of business and development.
About the author
Adva saldinger devex
Adva Saldinger
Follow@deveximpact

As a Devex Impact reporter, Adva covers the intersection of business and international development. Previously, she has worked as a reporter at newspapers in both the US and South Africa. Most recently, she has been ghostwriting a memoir for James Kofi Annan, a former child slave and NGO founder in Ghana.

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Harry S. Truman is recorded as saying: It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit. – */S.Y\ Transformation of Thought Leader give New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom. Best Business Decision for SME’s.
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The No. 1 Habit of Highly Creative People

The No. 1 Habit of Highly Creative People | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

Creativity is a nebulous, murky topic that fascinates me endlessly — how does it work? What habits to creative people do that makes them so successful at creativity?

I’ve reflected on my own creative habits, but decided I’d look at the habits that others consider important to their creativity. I picked a handful of creatives, almost at random — there are so many that picking the best would be impossible, so I just picked some that I admire, who came to mind when I thought of the word “creative”.

This was going to be a list of their creative habits … but in reviewing their lists, and my own habits, I found one that stood out. And it stands out if you review the habits and quotes from great creative people in history.

It’s the Most Important Habit when it comes to creativity.

After you read the No. 1 habit, please scroll down and read the No. 2 habit — they might seem contradictory but in my experience, you can’t really hit your creative stride until you find a way to balance both habits.

The No. 1 Creativity Habit
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Habit of Highly Creative People. - */S.Y\ A Permanent Creativity give " Things of Perfection", the Application of They born Smart Transformation / New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom. This is New Level of Knowledge.
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Is Leadership Irrelevant? - Forbes

Is Leadership Irrelevant? - Forbes | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it
Leaders today find the world changing around them faster than they can keep up.

Via ValerieMalaval, Riaz Khan
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Characteristics of Highly Creative People

Characteristics of Highly Creative People | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

There are a surprising number of blog posts about the characteristics of creative people. However, most of these seem to focus either on an idealized vision of an artist or the blog-writer’s idealized self-image! Here is my take on the characteristics of highly creative people. However, what I have done is looked at how creative people think -- based on my understanding of the latest research -- and applied it to behavior.

 

It is also worth bearing in mind that creativity is not all positive. There are good and bad creative people. Moreover, there seem to be some characteristics of creative people, such as dishonesty, that are not very nice. More controversially, some research has shown a correlation between creativity and mental illness. (The validity of this is contested, though.)

 


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Creative People Are Introverts, Extroverts, Collaborators, Independent, Big, Small, Fat, Skinny... - */S.Y\ Creative Reflection determine your Capacity for Rethinking with New Mindset .

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Medium

Medium | Real Way  for  Development | Scoop.it

Click here to edit the content...


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Sergey Yatsenko
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New  media Symbiosis. This  is  the Positive Effect  of  Interaction  in   Social Media / Facebook, Twitter, Scoop.it, LinkedIn, About me, SladeShare, Viadeo, .../.                 

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, December 11, 2012 2:30 AM

Lots of services have successfully lowered the bar for sharing information, but there’s been less progress toward raising the quality of what’s produced. It’s great that you can be a one-person media outlet, but it’d be even better if there were more ways you could work with others. And in a world of increasingly overwhelming quantities of content, how do we direct our attention to what’s most valuable, not just what’s interesting and of-the-moment?

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The End of Knowledge Management is Already Here

Despite what people think, the end state of knowledge management is already here. All future things are uncertain and that is not going to change no matter how much information, or how many artifacts, you have at hand. Entropy dictates that the problems of uncertainty multiply with the increase of information or artifacts. Topic: Information Management.

Via Knowledge Management Unit, BroadaInfo
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Reset your goalposts. Rather than seeking certainty via masses of information and artifacts, look to deliver a refined perspective and insight. - */S.Y\ A Permanent Creativity is the Best Quality for Leader with New Opportunities for Business.

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BroadaInfo's curator insight, March 26, 2015 9:19 PM

An interesting post to ponder on the future of knowledge management. 

Yoke Wong's curator insight, April 15, 2015 11:06 PM

Some confusions in the article on the subject KM. Beto do Valle's insights at the end have clarified the understandings and are definitely worth noting. He wrote, "knowledge management" still needs to find better ways to make more value out of knowledge sharing, flow, application and innovation".