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Nelson Mandela's Legend: 7 Leadership Lessons |...

Nelson Mandela's Legend: 7 Leadership Lessons |... | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
In a world where people frequently express their disillusionment with politicians and their inability to make a difference, Nelson Mandela is a shining star. There are 7 profound lessons that CEOs and leaders can learn from him.
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

Reading the lessons presented here, I'm reminded of a few other great leaders: Dag Hammarskjold, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Ronald Reagan.  And what a privilege it is to have lived in an era marked by their World-changing leadership.  These leaders have a legacy because of the leaders they've inspired.  But reality suggests that precious few will learn these lessons and fewer still will have the perseverence to apply them.  I believe it's because they demand of us a deep personal sacrifice for the good of others (meaning you'd have to become the best version of you and give yourself away). 

 

In Real Leadership! Are Your Ready?, I discuss this idea at length.  How can we be the best leadership educated society in the history of business (and politics), with numerous examples of World-changing leaders, and yet still suffer from lackluster leadership in many vital areas?  Could it be that we lack the essential ingredient of sacrifice in our leadership platforms?  Could it be that we still depend too much on experience (instead of theory) as our teacher, such that a lengthy maturation period is required before we can hope to develop into a leader?  Could it be that we stop learning altogether at some point, only to fall prey to entropy when it comes to our development as a leader?

 

Certainly, Nelson Mandela is a Real Leader who offers many lessons to enrich our personal leadership, if we are ready and willing. 

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Real Leadership! Are You Ready?
Real Leadership! Are You Ready? is a topic dedicated to sharing the key concepts presented in my new book by the same title. It offers an emboldened look at what it takes to be a Real Leader. And I promise, it is not a walk in the park or snooze in the shade. By defining leadership as movement-by-appointment and introducing concepts like Leadership Platforms built and maintained around ideas like right leadership vs. wrong leadership and born-in leadership potential vs. made-in leadership performance, this topic will share insights to ignite your thinking about leadership in places you may have never before had a spark, and it will challenge you to take that new information and use it to improve your performance...brandishing the torch of an entirely new level of a personal leadership that can be used to elevate the level of leadership in your organization. I hope you enjoy and commit to using what may be discovered here, because Real Leaders are in short supply. You could be the next one. If you are ready, go to ready4realleadership.com to get started.
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4 Lessons Every Business Leader Can Learn From Legendary Marine General ... - Business Insider

4 Lessons Every Business Leader Can Learn From Legendary Marine General ... - Business Insider | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Business Insider
4 Lessons Every Business Leader Can Learn From Legendary Marine General ...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

Spot on! The only thing I could add is with regard to his fourth lesson on organizational culture. While I agree with and understand what General Mattis is saying, “[Culture] is whatever the seniors say it is” doesn't go far enough. It's not what the seniors "say," rather it is who the seniors "are" and what the seniors "do" that counts. The operating culture will always be determined by the actual impact that senior leaders have (driven by behaviors) on others, regardless of what they intended (driven by messages). And farther back, these behaviors are driven by the thinking styles of seniors, which brings us inexorably back to their personal platform and who they really are as leaders.

 

This is always the case, but never more evident than in situations where the chips are down. As the leadership axiom goes; in a crisis situation you won't rise to the occasion, you'll default to the level of your thinking. I think General Mattis, with more room to exposit his thoughts on leadership, would agree.

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The Leadership Glory of Being a Great No. 2 - Forbes

The Leadership Glory of Being a Great No. 2 - Forbes | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
The Leadership Glory of Being a Great No. 2
Forbes
Don't settle for second place, says almost every leadership writer out there. Correct, Richard Hytner would respond. Rather than settling for it, embrace it, love it, glory in it.
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

Here, again, I think we get caught up in the wrong-headed idea that, somehow, leadership corresponds to our position or rank. What else can you conclude from the title of this article in Forbes? In spite of this all-to-popular notion, the reality is that you can have a CEO who isn't leading and a Janitor who is leading in the very same company. It all goes back to how we define "leadership." To that end, I believe it's high time we forget the ranking, whether by numbers (i.e., 1, 2, 3, etc.) or the alphabet (e.g., a, b, c, etc.) and start rethinking and reframing personal and organizational potential and performance. And if you're the least bit curious or ready to consider an alternative to what you've always thought about leadership--in part because of articles like this--pick up Real Leadership! Are You Ready? 

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Leadership WalkRounds – a great thing? | Center for Patient Safety

Leadership WalkRounds – a great thing? | Center for Patient Safety | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Wait a minute, not if there is no follow through on identified issues. If that's the case, front line staff may become more cynical and perceptions of safety culture may actually worsen according to a recent study of 44 neonatal ...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

One of the first things I always recommend, whether to Executives that I'm coaching or Organizations I'm consulting, to truly ignite a constructive shift in the culture, is the practice of "management by walking around," or as Quint Studer put it in Hardwiring Excellence: "rounding for employee outcomes."  But as this article points out, this simple practice is anything but easy because it requires follow-through on ideas for improvement or removal of challenges and obstacles to successful work. 

 

That late Dr. J. Clayton Lafferty, founder of Human Synergistics International, once said: "Any manager who successfully communicates to his or her people that their effort in talking isn't going to pay off is unaffordable in business."  One of the quickest ways to communicate to your organization that their effort in talking to you isn't paying off is to ask and not act...to listen and not respond. 

 

If you don't have any intention (or better yet, a solid plan/ approach in place) of responding to the answers you are given, don't bother asking the questions.  Additionally, if your response is going to be anything but constructive (e.g., dismissive or, worse yet, passive/ aggressive defensive where blame is fixed rather than the system), don't bother leaving your office.  In either case, you'd be far better off with putting a "suggestion box" outside your door and asking people to stick their ideas and problems there, which is akin to asking them to "park their brains at the door." 

 

In either case, this would be reflective of what I call wrong and ineffective leadership in my latest book: Real Leadership! Are You Ready?  In contrast, right and effective leaders know that simple doesn't mean easy, but they are willing to take pains and respond nonetheless in constructive ways.  Guided by theories like Deming's Profound Knowledge and 14 Points and tools like Lafferty's Circumplicial Integrated Change Model, they recognize the real power in developing a keen "sense and respond" capability as part of their Personal and Organizational Leadership Platform.  They also realize, as Meg Wheatley spoke about in Leadership and the New Science, that relationships are the only real conduit for the exchange of information in organizations and, in the process of working together in constructive ways, we can truly create a new vision for the organization. 

 

Think about it.  If people in your organization no longer want to talk to one another, it really doesn't matter at the end of the day how sophisticated your information systems are, how you manage BIG DATA or employ knowledge management tools or even how well you train people to be better communicators.  All the information that is available to you from intellectual capital remains locked in the storage unit, whether IT systems (explicit knowledge) or human systems (tacit knowledge).  

 

And if you are looking for a solid approach to sense and respond, consider the Leadership Enrichment LIFE-cycle I offer in Part II of my book: Real Leadership! Are You Ready?  It is designed to help you learn, change, grow and lead through awareness, acceptance, action and achievement.

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Unit Effectiveness Inspections going AF-wide - AirForceTimes.com

Unit Effectiveness Inspections going AF-wide AirForceTimes.com Airmen can expect more short-notice reviews and a constant focus on readiness under the new Unit Effectiveness Inspection program scheduled to be in place throughout the Air Force by...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

How great is this: "...our focus was/is changing the culture to where we do not have to prepare for inspections; it should show in our daily mission readiness.”  YES!  Exactly how it should be.  Leaders should establish a constructive culture whereby overall individual, group and organizational effectiveness is a natural outcome.  Over time, with Real Leaders putting the right systems, structures, technologies and skills/ qualities (e.g., the antecedents of organizational culture) in place, USAF Units should be able to cease dependence on inspections as a means of ensuring readiness. 

 

If successful, the USAF could be well on their way to what my good friend Dave Guerra calls SUPERPERFORMANCE...the polar complementarity of culture (i.e., Leadership) and process (i.e., Management). 

 

And the best part is, there are statistically valid instruments for assessing organizational culture (OCI by Human Synergistics) and organizational effectiveness (OEI by Human Synergistics).  All that's left is for the USAF to measure and improve the "causes" (leadership and culture) through assessment of the "effect" (effectiveness and readiness) they intend to measure and improve by inspection.

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Reveal Yourself And Others Will Follow - Authentic Leadership - Forbes

Reveal Yourself And Others Will Follow - Authentic Leadership - Forbes | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Reveal Yourself And Others Will Follow - Authentic Leadership
Forbes
Jennifer Petrigliere: So, traditionally in leadership studies, we tend to focus on styles or actions of leaders, which of course are important.
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

"...as a leader in this day-and-age, it’s very important to be more personable, to reveal more aspects of yourself and not just to be the thing that people can see."  In Real Leadership! Are You Ready?, I talk about leadership becoming personal before it ever becomes organizational.  In other words, if you expect others to appoint you as their leader or choose to follow your lead, you must become someone worthy of following.  Authentic Leadership is the term used in this article, and it rests on the strength of your character and the authority of your example more than the strength of your position or the authority of your rank/ title.

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7 ways hospitals build leadership development programs - FierceHealthcare

7 ways hospitals build leadership development programs - FierceHealthcare | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
7 ways hospitals build leadership development programs FierceHealthcare Lehigh Valley Health Network, an academic community hospital in Pennsylvania with five hospital campuses and almost 13,000 employees, created a two-year leadership program that...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

John Maxwell once quipped: "Everything rises and falls on leadership!"  Never is that more apparent than in establishing a Leadership Development program.  In the natural order of things, Senior Leaders within the organization must establish a culture where future leaders can develop and ultimately improve individual, group and organizational performance.

 

As it turns out, this is a very tall order to fill and simply doesn't happen all that often, which might explain a great deal about the lackluster performance of many organizations today.

 

In Real Leadership! Are You Ready?, I present it this way:

 

“From the pen of Louis Finkelstein comes this morsel of truth: ‘Wisdom begins with sacrifice of immediate pleasures for long-range purposes.’....These concepts of leadership have been around for years, yet we still have trouble swallowing or digesting this counsel as part of our leadership diet. Why is that?

 

“Ronald Wright gets credit for this in A Short History of Progress, but his progress trap idea may provide a central reason for why many never make the leap:

 

“In a progress trap, those in positions of authority are unwilling to make changes necessary for future survival. To do so they would need to sacrifice their current status and political power at the top of a hierarchy. (Wikipedia)

 

“Perhaps this explains why many leaders (and their organizations) reach a performance plateau. Mired in past success (accumulated while climbing the corporate ladder) and trapped by a desire to maintain position in the hierarchy, those at the top become unwilling to sacrifice status and power. As a result, empowerment to renew and improve dries up, yesterday’s solutions become today’s problems, low hanging fruit grows back and all upward and outward movement grinds to a halt.”

 

Thankfully, it appears this healthcare system has a Senior Leadership Team that is willing to make the personal sacrifice.  Yes...Real Leadership must first become personal before it can ever become organizational.

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Breaking bad leadership - Jakarta Post

Breaking bad leadership - Jakarta Post | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Breaking bad leadership
Jakarta Post
We have known for a long time that leaders need to continue to learn throughout their careers. About 50 years ago, US President John F.
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

If you truly want to break what I call Wrong and Ineffective Leadership and start to build Right and Effective Leadership, learning is essential.

 

In part 2 of Real Leadership! Are You Ready?, I specifically address the process that each leader must move through recursively in order to develop a leadership worthy of followership and to become the type of leader worthy of followers.  I named this process the Leadership Enrichment LIFE-cycle (LEL-c) and use LIFE as metaphor (i.e., to denote the journey is one of a lifetime) and to ascribe meaning (i.e., to denote the four stages of Leadership Enrichment: Life-Long Learning; Internal Locus of Control; Fulfillment; Excellence).

 

Certainly, the LEL-c begins with Life-Long Learning, which entails a challenging journey through an emotional connector (AWARENESS) and lands at a performance waypoint (LEARN). But the journey was never intended to stop a the first waypoint, rather to continue through the remaining emotional connectors (ACCEPTANCE, ACTION, ACHEIVEMENT) with brief lay-overs at the remaining performance waypoints (CHANGE, GROW, LEAD). 

 

Check it out. The Personal and Organizational Leadership Platforms that can emerge are real LIFE-changers.

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Dominant Leadership - Become A Charismatic And Fearless Leader Of Men, Women, and Nations

http://mindpersuasion.com Everybody is a born leader. Once you program yourself with the right set of beliefs to unlock your inherent skills, nothing can sto...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

Everyone is created with "born-in" Leadership Potential.  Not everyone converts that potential, however, through "made-in" Leadership Performance.  And while I agree there is an absolute need to select the "right set of beliefs" and that NLP can play a critical role in a leader's early development strategy, I also contend that the sum-total of those beliefs (e.g., worldview) must include beliefs about others--not just about ourselves--particularly when we're talking about the difference in becoming a Real Leader as opposed to an imposter or poser.

 

I've observed many over the years who truly believe they are leading when, in fact, no one is following.  They are absoluley convinced of something that just ins't so.

 

To break out of that mold and become a Real Leader, it does matter what you believe about yourself...that is just a starting point--a certificate of beginning.  What reallly matters is what you believe about others...the ones that your leadership impacts on a daily basis and, ultiimately, what they believe about you.  

 

This explains why every Real Leader that I know: (a) truly believes that right leadership is based on the moral law and a love for the moral law giver (e.g., the greatest commandment) and (b) truly believes that effective leadership is based on caring enough about others (e.g., the second greatest commandment) to ask them regularly about the impact their leadership is having. 

 

This is not an easy process.  In fact, it is very humbling.  But it is equally necessary and useful in the development of Real Leadership.  It is not easy because the former will require sacrifice and the latter requires the hard work of dealing with new information about your impact on others that is not very gratifying. 

 

Regardless, if you are willing to submit yourself to the moral law, sacrifice yourself for the sake of others, and take pains with making improvements on the basis of the feedback you receive, it is better than any single belief you may have about yourself when it comes to developing a Real Leadership platform that can rise to the bottom.  Only from the bottom are you able to move upward and/ or outward with Passion, Patience, and Perseverence to create value for and with others.   

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Leadership lessons from the Olympics - Washington Post (blog)

Leadership lessons from the Olympics - Washington Post (blog) | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Washington Post (blog)
Leadership lessons from the Olympics
Washington Post (blog)
Looking at the Olympics through this leadership lens, I see the connection with federal managers.
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

I love this post for two reasons: (1) its focus on fixing the system rather than fixing the blame and (2) its counsel to remove barriers around a team's successful work.  Working as a Defense Contractor I'm around government employees at the management level every day.  The only thing I'd add to the litany of leadership lessons is to refrain from trying to "motivate" your team, rather start identifying and eliminating the demotivators. This single act will unleash the intrinsic motivation that each member of your team needs to perform extremely well. 

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A cult of leadership in councils leaves management skills by the wayside - The Guardian

A cult of leadership in councils leaves management skills by the wayside - The Guardian | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
The Guardian A cult of leadership in councils leaves management skills by the wayside The Guardian There is a recent trend in career development emphasising the importance of leadership skills over management as a means to progress, but I think...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

So continues the debate between the virtues of managership and leadership!  We've all heard that: "All leaders are managers, but not all managers are leaders" or "Leaders and managers are 95% the same but differ in the 5% that matters" or "Lead people; manage things!"  While I agree with each of these statements, they don't go far enough to create a distinction with much difference.  My good friend Dave Guerra (author of Superperformance) does this best. He says that Management and Leadership are polar complements...opposites that need each other for organizations to be successful. 

 

The author of this article touches on this when pointing out that there is a price to pay for sacrificing management skills on the alter of leadeship, and I would agree based on the polar complementarity principle.  But we need to be cautious when ascribing the functions of management vs. leadership.  It may be true that "Coaching, performance management and learning the lessons of failure" are distinctly management activities, it is leadership that will ultimately determine the efficacy of these activities through the organizational culture it establshes.  These same management functions performed in organizations with three different cultures--one that is constructive; one that is passive-defensive; and one that is aggressive-defensive--will yield drastically different results.

 

Hera again I call on Dave Guerra to underscore the point: Culture (e.g., leadership) x Process (e.g., managership) = SUPERPERFORMANCE!

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Leadership With Simon Sinek: Serving Those Who Serve Others

Jonathan Fields of Good Life Project spent close to an hour in deep conversation with Sinek discussing the impact of leadership, and how we should all be pushing ourselves by asking more questions and demanding that these questions be answered in a much simpler way.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

"The worst leaders are the ones that think they have to know as much or more than the poeple who work with them." - Simon Sinek

 

Simon may be on to something basic here, in spite of his misplaced reference to evolution, his misunderstanding of the human mind when it comes to self-preservation (the first law of nature), his miscomparison of human beings to animals and the obvious implications of overlooking the moral law giver when it comes to right and wrong (the first law of human nature).  In other words, while there is nothing in evolution that explains the imperative to tell the truth as apposed to telling a lie or accounts for developing an "attitude of giving" or a wllingness to sacrifice for others, we can and should take seriously this idea of accepting that we, as leaders, don't (and can't, by definition, if you accept that teams outperform individuals even when that individual is the team lead) know more than those who work with us and every time we act as if we do, it signals the beginning of a demise and our failure as leaders. 

 

We should also altogether support Simon's rejection of the leadership of Jack Welch (GE) and his veneration of the leadership of Jim Sinegal (COSTCO). 

 

In fact, many of the ideas presented by Simon in this interview are consistent with the things I wrote about in my latest book, but we'd likely differ on the cause (whether the first or most proximate) of a Leadership - Culture - Performance connection in producing the effects being endorsed.  The obvious question now is, does it really matter where we ascribe the cause of right and effective leadership?  I believe it does matter and provide the rationale on pages 96 and 97 of Real Leadership! Are You Ready?

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Don Cloud's curator insight, October 12, 2013 10:10 AM

Kenneth, thanks for sharing! 

 

An insight-packed chat with Simon Sinek!  Worth your time!

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The Single Most Important Management Tool to Grow Your Business

The Single Most Important Management Tool to Grow Your Business | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Is your organization ready to succeed? Unlock the single most important tool that you as a manager can utilize to grow or transform your business effectively.

Via John Michel
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

This article touches on an important aspect of success.  Organizational discovery, void of the right framework for application--the right values to guide the vision/ mission and a strategy to achieve that vision supported by the right structures and functions--will still yield nothing or, worse yet, have the effect of making things worse (as W. Edwards Deming used to caution was the natural consequence of "doing our best without knowledge").  While discovery is important, it must be made from a framework guided by theory and in a manner that allows fluid application toward the right goals, aims and objectives through a constancy of purpose across the organization.  And this is not a management function...it is the result of prescriptive leadership and the constructive organizational culture it produces. 

 

John Michel nailed it...implement/ deploy systems and structures that support that strategy and align the functions within that structure through job design and leadership/ communication skills/ qualities and you'll be in a much better place to begin your discovery and and have a much greater chance at succeeding with transformation.      

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Marcus Aldrin Andersson's curator insight, September 19, 2013 1:17 PM

Some insightfull thoughts on managing what is and what could be. 

Dorothy M Neddermeyer, PhD's comment, September 27, 2013 11:50 AM
Richard: Thanks for sharing your wisdom.
Dorothy M Neddermeyer, PhD's comment, September 27, 2013 11:51 AM
Daniel: Thanks for sharing your wisdom. As a Change Management Specialist, resistance to change is the number 1 reason businesses fail to thrive or die.
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With Social Media, All of Your Employees Are Brand Ambassadors | Blog: The Practical Employer - Workforce.com

With Social Media, All of Your Employees Are Brand Ambassadors | Blog: The Practical Employer - Workforce.com | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
With Social Media, All of Your Employees Are Brand Ambassadors. Whether you like it or not, social media has turned each of your employees into a brand ambassador.
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

If you have to worry about how social media is effecting and affecting your brand, you have bigger issues to worry about than social media.  In fact, I believe social media has become the new Union (organized labor) of the technical/ knowledge worker and the reasons they turn to social media are the same that hourly workers turn to the UAW or UFCW or AFL-CIO.  Treat your employees as customers and assets TO the company, and you won't have this problem of worry about what your employees may say.  Treat employees as suppliers and assets OF the company, and you won't escape this problem.  The difference between the two alternatives: Real Leadership! Are You Ready?

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Stop Honking! Start Leading!

Stop Honking! Start Leading! | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it

Ever work with someone who constantly approaches daily teamwork like an irritated driver sitting in their car honking the horn while you are trying to get your car started? I continue to be amazed how subtle it is and perplexed by how often it occurs. And how we've become so immune to it we don't even recognize when it's occurring or how damaging it can be to personal, group, and organizational performance.

 

Here's just one example: How often do we talk about teams but then get irritated because we feel we are "doing someone else's job?" If we were on a high performance work team, there would be no such complaints...no "horn-honking." We'd know what each member of the team is responsible for and work to enable every other member of the team in the performance of their work. Enabling others certainly starts by fulfilling our own responsibilities for the good of the team and avoiding all forms of dirty-delegation, but it also includes stepping up and stepping in, when needed, to help our teammates with their work...with "getting their car started."

 

This is basic to Real Leadership! Are You Ready? 

 

Take your hand off the horn, get out of the car and grab your jumper cables the next time a teammate needs help starting their car. At the end of the day, teams are only as fast as their slowest member and bad things begin to happen when we forget that.   

Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

If we're serious about creating high performance work teams and elevating teamwork in our organizations, then we must be equally concerned with leadership. In writing this, I was reminded of many examples from my 30+ years of experience in the United States Marine Corps, United States Air Force and numerous commercial organizations where we performed well simply because this basic leadership principle of enabling others was being practiced by everyone on the team.

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A Father's 10 Lessons about Leadership

A Father's 10 Lessons about Leadership | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Today is Father's Day, a time we set aside to honor fathers and the role fatherhood plays in our society. Being the father of two boys (Michael 22, Matthew 18) is one of the greatest joys of my lif...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

Perhaps the shortest of all my thoughts on leadership, but the most vital I've ever written.  This Father's Day I was reminded of how much my leadership platform has been influenced by three Godly men: 1) my Dad, Tommy Eugene Dillard (1934-1974), 2) my Uncle, Kenneth Lawrence Petrosky and 3) my Father-in-Law, Eugene Anthony Hoffman.  These are the most Real Leaders I'll ever know, and I'm incredibly blessed by and far better for their right and effective models of Servant Leadership in the home.  And my debt of gratitude to them will be paid forward through the legacy of Real Leadership I leave with my four Daughters.  Some are blessed to have one Dad.  A few are blessed to have two.  I've had three.  May I be the Real Leader these men invested themselves in creating by the power of their character and daily example.  

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3 Priorities for Leaders Who Want to Go Beyond Command-and ...

3 Priorities for Leaders Who Want to Go Beyond Command-and ... | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
It's cliché to say that “command and control” leadership is no longer relevant in most organizational contexts. But — especially in large, global, diverse organizations — what should it be replaced with?
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

The author's of this HBR article suggest that "command and control" leadership should be replaced with "...inspiration and purpose, adaptability and engagement, and authenticity." 

 

While I can support these 3 ideas as being both valid and useful for leaders, they are not suitable replacements for "command and control" as they don't address the antecedents that actually produce the operating culture of an organization. For example, you can be authentic, corall your organization around a common purpose, inspire confidence in the results and promote adaptability and engagement but still rely on "command and control" methods, models and theories that govern how people should approach one another and their daily work (e.g., the operating culture). 

 

If you really want to replace "command and control," you must go to work on the management systems, structures, and technology in the organization, as well as the skills & qualities of leaders.  According to the Human Synergistics International (HSI) model for "How Culture Works" (http://www.humansynergistics.com/Files/HTML5/HowCultureWorks/index.html) these represent the causal factors of operating culture and, as a result, they become the only real levers for change.

 

Lastly, W. Edwards Deming told us a long time ago: "The prevailing style of management must undergo transformation." By this he was referring to "command and control." But he didn't stop there, he also gave us the means of replacement: "A system cannot understand itself. The transformation requires a view from outside." And that view is only possible through the lense of Profound Knowledge. Then he gave us the means: 14 Points to begin and sustain the transformation and the 7 Deadly Diseases to avoid in the journey.

 

With the How Culture Works model from HSI and Deming's System of Profound Knowledge, 14 Points and 7 Deadly Diseases in your Real Leadership toolbox, the only thing that's required is the courage to act on it for your organization. Are you ready?   

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7 Essential Qualities of All Great Leaders

Click here http://www.briantracy.com/wealthreport to receive my FREE REPORT: The Way to Wealth! There are 7 leadership qualities that all great leaders posse...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

Do you have (1) Vision; (2) Courage; (3) Integrity; (4) Humility; (5) Strategic Planning; (6) Focus; (7) Cooperation...the 7 leadership qualities that all great leaders possess?  Before answering, consider these 7 qualities in the context of Real Leadership:

 

(1) Vision (of personal and organizational potential...thanks Dr. J. Clayton Lafferty); 

(2) Perseverence (courage stretched out...thanks Tim Hansel);

(3) Character (who you are in the dark...thanks Dwight L. Moody);

(4) Humility (carrying the weight of glory for each person that chooses to follow your lead...thanks C. S. Lewis);

(5) Strategy (flexing with a future in flux...thanks Chuck Swindoll);

(6) Focus (on fixing the system...not on fixing the blame; on efforts...not just on results...thanks Dr. W. Edwards Deming);

(7) Cooperation (the case against internal competition...thanks Alfie Kohn).  

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Teamwork: 3 Cornerstones of the “Top 1% of the 1%” -- Lessons from the U.S. ... - Business 2 Community

Teamwork: 3 Cornerstones of the “Top 1% of the 1%” -- Lessons from the U.S. ... - Business 2 Community | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Business 2 Community
Teamwork: 3 Cornerstones of the “Top 1% of the 1%” -- Lessons from the U.S. ...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

The article really points up one of the biggest areas for improvement when it comes to performance: giving our teams the opportunity, on a regular basis, to practice as a team.  This simple aspect is conspicuous by absence in many organizations. 

 

Sure...they set up teams and talk about teamwork and post motivational team posters all over the walls. 

 

In the end, however, they never fill up or free up the teams to be successful or effective when it comes to striving for consensus-driven, synergistic decisions or exercising the essential balance of interpersonal, task and rational skills as they approach one another in their pursuit of a goal or objective.

 

If you are tempted to question that, riddle me this. When was the last time you were able to "practice' making decisions or solving problems as a team using a simulation or challenge exercise?  If we're honest, many of us would say: "There was this one time..." or "It's been a few years, but...", and herein lies the rub.  All of us are still expected to work together as a high-performance work team and make effective decisions for the organizations, groups and individuals we serve. 

 

To reward 'A' (a system where teams can't practice) and expect 'B' (outcomes where teams make effective decisions) is management folly. 

 

There is an old saying: "If you want someone to do a good job, give them a good job to do"  Well, if you want your teams to perform better, give them a chance to practice.  The Group Styles Inventory (GSI) and Team Building Simulations from Human Synergistics International (http://humansynergistics.com/) are great places to start.

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5 Lessons I learned About Leadership as a Sergeant in the Israeli Army

5 Lessons I learned About Leadership as a Sergeant in the Israeli Army | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
The vital lessons learned during my time in Israel have shaped the person I am today as well as the leadership approach I take with all teams I manage.
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

Best quote: "If I had to sum up my experience in one sentence, I’d have to say it was learning how much can be accomplished when everyone acknowledges and recognizes the support of the team around them, for without your team, you are nothing."

 

AGREED!  On a high-performance work team, everyone can (and will) lead at some point...depending on the mission/ objective and the individual skills/ qualities required throughout the process of accomplishing it.  And there all no self-appointed leaders; "Leader" is a title given only by the appointment of those who choose to follow your lead...and YOU MUST EARN IT!

 

These ideas are central to Real Leaders.  In part 1 of Real Leadership! Are You Ready?, I spend a lot of time on simply rethinking and reframing leadership along lines like this because a balanced focus between self and others provides the necessary backdrop for part 2 and the Leadership Enrichment LIFE-cycle.  Without a better understanding of what Leadership is/ is not, there is no way to become a Real Leader. 

 

Check it out: http://www.ready4realleadership.com.

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Building a personal leadership style - Wake Forest University News Center

Building a personal leadership style - Wake Forest University News Center | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Wake Forest University News Center Building a personal leadership style Wake Forest University News Center In the high-pressure world of professional sports, where aggressiveness is often seen as a sign of a strong leader, Super Bowl-winning coach...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

Want to know what Real Leadership looks like?  It looks like Coach Dungy. 

 

"Whether leading a sports team, a team of colleagues or a family, [Super Bowl-winning Coach Tony Dungy] believes in building up rather than breaking down and putting others first....Dungy puts the coach on the bottom and the players at the top. The message to the team is that the coach supports the structure, and the leaders are everywhere in the organization....Separate yourself from the crowd by helping people. If your motivation is to make a difference in others, you’re always going to shine.”

 

In my latest book: Real Leadership! Are You Ready?, I prescribe the hard but essential development effort that is required to produce the type of personal and organizational success that Coach Dungy enjoys.  It awaits anyone who is willing to learn, change and grow, but will only come at the speed of leadership.

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Robertson High producing leaders - Fremont Bulletin

Robertson High producing leaders - Fremont Bulletin | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Robertson High producing leaders Fremont Bulletin The effect the program has had on the leadership students at Robertson as well the general population has been a dramatic shift in the campus culture, sowing changes in the students' academia and...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

I love to see programs like this in secondary education.  Leadership is a subject that should be explored early and often throughout our academic careers. 

 

In fact, one of the things I've routinely observed by working with youth in high school, as well as young adults, is that while they may have developed a learning-orientation through years of school and are very willing to accept what they become aware of, they don't know how to act on the new information they are given in order to achieve higher levels of performance as a real leader. 

 

In contrast, the older, more mature professionals I've worked with for the past 30 years tend to have a well-developed action-orientation, but they don't change or grow because they have actually stopped learning a long time ago.  In other words, all their actions today are based on the actions of yesterday...we call that experience.  And while experience can offer some extremely memorable lessons, it is a poor teacher because it forces you to take the test before revealing the lesson. 

 

I once heard Chuck Swindoll quip that it takes some people 4 years to get a college degree and 40 years to get over it.  I believe he was referring to the idea that it can take a while to unlearn some of the wrong-headed ideas and outright falsehoods that are routinely taught as good and true in the textbooks used in modern educational curriculum and, if he was, he could have also been pointing up the fact that many people stop learning as soon as they get the degree or diploma. 

 

Anyone can get a degree by learning about science, art, sociology, math, et al., and these are all worthwhile subjects.  Leadership, on the other hand, asks the student to learn about themselves through coaches, mentors, and myriad non-neutral opportunities available each day as we interact with one another.  This means that we can avoid the trap of over-reliance on experience as our teacher and begin to learn from the experiences of others.  And not just from our coaches and mentors, but from those who we impact on a regular basis through our approach to work, study and play.  All we have to do is elevate our awareness to these incredible learning opportunities, and programs like this at Robertson High go a long way in facilitating that process.  

 

In science class we learn about the scientific method and it's importance in the discovery process.  In math class we learn about probability and statistics and how important they are in the evaluation process.  In leadership class, we should be learning about the Leadership Enrichment LIFE-cycle and its importance in elevating our level of leadership toward constructive, long-term, and sustainable value delivery for and with others.  Leadership must first become personal; it's a real inside job as we begin to learn, change, grow and lead through awareness, acceptance, action and achievement.

 

Leadership is better caught than taught, and there is no better time or place to begin catching it than in our youth.  In fact, much of what I wrote about in Real Leadership! Are You Ready? was caught from my mentors over the years.

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Timeless Leadership Lessons From a Young George Washington - Forbes

Timeless Leadership Lessons From a Young George Washington - Forbes | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Timeless Leadership Lessons From a Young George Washington Forbes What emerged is a complex portrait of leadership, revealing some of the many elements that formed Washington's character and his deliberate effort to be a new type of leader for a...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

Ever had a boss who was intimidated by your knowledge, skills or abilities?  How about one who had to be the "smartest" person in the room?  Or perhaps you find yourself becoming easily intimidated when someone in your down-line is extremely talented.  The reality is, it isn't all that uncommon.

 

Thankfully, there are exceptions, among which the most prominent is GEORGE WASHINGTON!  Our first President never experienced this particular Leadership challenge.  He was a Real Leader with a passion for anonymity who intentionally surrounded himself with those who were smarter and more capable. 

 

How about you?  Are you ready for Real Leadership?  If so, it will require that you learn, change and grow to a level of personal excellence where humility becomes authentic instead of an artificial covering for low self-concept.  And if you are a leader that gets easily intimidated by talent greater than your own...KNOCK IT OFF!  The negative effect this has on personal and organizational potential and performance is both high and frightening.   

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5 Insecurities Leaders Have to Overcome

5 Insecurities Leaders Have to Overcome | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
As a leader, people naturally have high expectations of you—knowing the answer to every problem, highly reliable, calm in the face of pressure. However,...

Via Anne Leong
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

It is true...at the end of the day, if Leaders are to become REAL and Authentic, they will be vulnerable before others (those they serve) and will have to come to terms with their own limitations.  In fact, awareness and acceptance of who we really are provides the essential ingredients to action and achievement in the Leadership Enrichment LIFE-cycle.  Never stop learning, changing, growing and leading...mostly about yourself as a leader and about the impact you are having on others.

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Mike Klintworth's curator insight, November 24, 2013 12:06 PM

These shortcomings, however, should not hinder you from performing your duties well. Rather, they should be considered challenges that will shape you to become a better example to other employees.

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What Leadership Books Don't Say - Leadership Platform

What Leadership Books Don't Say - Leadership Platform | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
If you venture into your local bookstore, you will find shelf upon shelf containing books written by those claiming to turn you into the next Stephen Covey, Nelson Mandela, Jack Welch, Bill Gates, or Steve Jobs.  Titles possessing declarations of ...

Via John Michel
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

This website and article captures the essense of Real Leadership! Are You Ready? and underscores the primary motivation I had in writing the book (soon to be released by Dog Ear Publishing in soft-cover and all four eBook formats).  It's all about rethinking and reframing personal and organizational potential and performance.

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John Michel's curator insight, October 7, 2013 11:38 AM

To truly influence one must be authentic, and true authenticity comes as a result of alignment of who we are with what we say and do.  Leadership authenticity requires one to be able to understand who they really are, and how this impacts and correlates with what they say and do as leaders. 

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Leadership: It is all in the Mind ... Stupid !

Leadership: It is all in the Mind ... Stupid ! | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Patterns of positive or negative self talk starts mostly in our childhood. It is very important to curb the negative self talk and replace it with positive ones.

Via Susan Bainbridge
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

Well...my latest book: Real Leadership! Are You Ready? just rolled off the press and the first 5 soft covers were delivered to my home. Part 2 of this book is dedicated to the process of Leadership Enrichment and spends a good deal of text on how our thinking style (the way we think) impacts our performance at the personal, group and organizational level. 

 

Just as this was taking place, I was weighing in on a new discussion thread that I recently started for the Organizational Development Network (ODN) on Linkedin.  The thread was about the impact, if any, that a "management system" might have on raising the level of leadership in our organizations. You see, I believe we aren't measuring or improving leadership the way we ought, particularly given the new theories and science that is available to us since Dr. J. Clayton Lafferty introduced the Integrated Change Model and Theoretical Model for How Culture Works, Dr. Deming introduced his System of Profound Knowledge and 14 Points, Meg Wheatley introduced Leadership and the New Science and Dave Guerra enlightened us with the idea that Management and Leadership are Polar Complements in Superperformance (Process x Culture).

 

For starters, we're still focused way too much on output/ results and not effort...too much on behaviors and not on what precedes it (i.e., attitudes, expectations of outcomes, worldview and thinking styles).  And we still fix the primary passage of reference on each individual as if the cause of our leadership dilemma was a local fault instead of on fixing the system that creates the behavior in the first place. Because of this, our primary solutions are what they used to be for defects in product quality years ago: (a) Inspections (i.e., performance appraisals) to identify gaps against the leadership competency model and (b) Training (leadership development courses) to close the gaps.

 

Much to my delight, a gentleman named Peter Demarest (Axiogenics) responded with some thoughts about his work in the area of neuro-axiology, the integration of  brain-science and value science.

 

In Peter's words: "What makes this science unique is that it does not focus on the outputs of performance, but rather the inputs that lead to and create performance (good or bad). Specifically it provides the means to quickly and objectively measure how a person thinks (interprets and gives meaning to everything) AND the means to teach that person how to measurably and sustainably transform how they think resulting in significant gains on the output/performance side - including alignment with vision, mission and values [of both the organization and the individual], as well as continually renewing and improving leadership (and all other roles) at the individual, group and organizational level."

 

Peter contests, and I agree, that it is more than just the "law of attraction" or oversimplified approaches to replacing negative thoughts with positive ones. His work with Axiogenics and the Hierarchy of Values is truly amazing when it comes to measuring how someone thinks and how that thinking can impact their behavior and performance.  It appears to be in complete alignment with what the late Dr. Lafferty helped us measure and improve through the Life Styles Inventory, Group Styles Inventory, and Organizational Culture Inventory as part of the Integrated Change Model.

 

For those who are truly interested in improving their performance as leaders and raising the level of leadership in their organizations, they are going to have to contend, at some point, with their individual thinking style.  Learning about how you think is an essential part of the Leadership Enrichment LIFE-cyle I just introduced in Real Leadership! Are You Ready? 

 

Oh...and it's not a rhetorical question.  So, are you ready? 

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