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Be Selfish. Be Very Selfish.

Be Selfish. Be Very Selfish. | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Focusing on your emotional state first and foremost has benefits for everyone. (Leadership Lesson: Be Selfish!
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

In my 50,000+ word book "Real Leadership! Are You Ready?", the idea of selfishness in leadership does come up once...and it is related to this context. Here is an excerpt from the section titled: Leadership may not be private, but it sure is personal.

 

Leadership is as much about self as it is others, but not in the way you may be thinking. To be both effective and right as a leader, we must attend to self-leadership; the governance of one’s own person. Without self-governance, there is little of real value to give away and/or little that others will perceive as being worthy of following. Ever wonder why senior leaders resign after compromises of integrity (i.e., extra-marital affairs, embezzling, etc.)? Stephen Covey picked up the flavor of this critical ingredient in our leadership enrichment recipe when he clarified in habit #5 of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People the first component of Greek (Aristotelian) philosophy on Rhetoric: credibility or ethical appeal (ETHOS). In order to be influential as a leader, we first need to maintain high standards of personal moral excellence (a private matter, as Dwight L. Moody quipped: “Character is what you are in the dark”)...otherwise no one will allow us to get close enough to really understand their concerns (PATHOS) or consider us credible enough to receive—let alone dare ever act on—our words (LOGOS), nor will they, as a result, ever choose to follow our lead. And if you question this idea or are tempted to wonder whether it matters, consider the results of a Baylor University study, recently conducted by Mitch Neubert and Dawn Carlson. According to the online article: As the Leader Goes, So Goes the Company (Carlson), their findings suggest that ethical leadership does indeed lead to better performance in the workplace and that Servant Leadership leads to more creative behavior on the part of employees. Real Leadership must first become personal, but it cannot stay private.

 

Problem is, we are congenitally blind to our own defects. So, if we are to improve our performance and impact as leaders--if we are to develop high standards of moral excellence, we need to develop a desire and design for feedback and, in a very real sense, this brings OTHERS directly back into the Leadership Enrichment LIFE-cycle. How's your leadership selfishness? Is it in this same context? If it's not in the context of Real Leadership!, all you have to do is say yes to the question: Are You Ready?

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Real Leadership! Are You Ready?
Real Leadership! Are You Ready? is a topic dedicated to sharing the key concepts presented in my new book by the same title. It offers an emboldened look at what it takes to be a Real Leader. And I promise, it is not a walk in the park or snooze in the shade. By defining leadership as movement-by-appointment and introducing concepts like Leadership Platforms built and maintained around ideas like right leadership vs. wrong leadership and born-in leadership potential vs. made-in leadership performance, this topic will share insights to ignite your thinking about leadership in places you may have never before had a spark, and it will challenge you to take that new information and use it to improve your performance...brandishing the torch of an entirely new level of a personal leadership that can be used to elevate the level of leadership in your organization. I hope you enjoy and commit to using what may be discovered here, because Real Leaders are in short supply. You could be the next one. If you are ready, go to ready4realleadership.com to get started.
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The Spirit of All Seasons, the Essence of Leadership and the Letter of the Law

The Spirit of All Seasons, the Essence of Leadership and the Letter of the Law | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it

From Kiev to Ferguson: Stable Words in an Unstable World | RZIM

Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

What Ravi so eloquently states and appropriately sets forth in this BLOG post at RZIM is what Real Leadership is all about. Imagine if our Nation’s leaders were encouraging this type of response…love, forgiveness, healing and reconciliation. We would see real progress. Instead, we are caught in a real “progress trap.”

 

Ronald Wright gets credit for putting it this way in A Short History of Progress: “In a progress trap, those in positions of authority are unwilling to make changes necessary for future survival. To do so they would need to sacrifice their current status and political power at the top of a hierarchy.” — Wikipedia

 

Being someone who fully understands the human condition–namely because I am fully human–I can fully enter into this idea and the reasons that Ravi lists for why they wouldn’t want to do such a thing. I can also understand why they, instead, choose “…the platitudes of political double-speak remind[ing] us that if we hope in politics and laws we will make the suicidal blunder of thinking that laws change hearts. They do not. Societal laws are always at the mercy of power brokers, as language without integrity of heart lends itself to the machinations of demagogues.” — Ravi Zacharias, From Kiev to Ferguson: Stable Words in an Unstable World | RZIM.

 

As Charles Colson once challenged all of us: “Where is the hope? I meet millions who tell me that they feel demoralized by the decay around us. Where is the hope? The hope that each of us has is not in who governs us or what laws are passed or what great things we do as a Nation. Our hope is in the power of God working through the hearts of people. And that’s where our hope is in this country. That’s where our hope is in life.”

 

How’s your leadership influencing others? Are you stuck in a progress trap? Where’s your hope? Is it in those who govern us and the laws they pass? If so, let me take this opportunity to ask something great of you. Be someone who get’s it and then get on with it! Make a commitment today to break out of the trap and start having hope in the power of God to work through your heart, then continue the transformation by giving yourself, and your hope, away for the benefit of others. That is Real Leadership! Are You Ready?

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Real Leadership! Are You Ready?

Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Rethinking & Reframing | Personal & Organizational | Potential & Performance
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

An overview of the Leadership Enrichment LIFE-cycle model--previously presented in the 4-part series one step (e.g., stage) at a time--including features and benefits.

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Leadership Enrichment - Part 3 of 4; The Value of Growing

Leadership Enrichment - Part 3 of 4; The Value of Growing | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Real Leadership! Are You Ready?: Rethinking and reframing personal and organizational potential and performance by Richard S. Dillard
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

In the first two installments, we established that Awareness leads to Learning and, through Acceptance, releases our potential for Changing. But until we begin to work the change plans we've established, our potential remains unfulfilled. So in this installment, we'll focus on Fulfillment: Action that enables Growing as we advance through the Leadership Enrichment LIFE-cycle (LEL-c).

 

When it comes to fulfillment, we truly need an ethical way forward. Here’s why: Leadership Enrichment is, of itself, a good thing, but to pursue it in the wrong way, by the wrong means or for the wrong reason is certain to get us off-track and corrupt/pervert the results. As Robert Wood Johnson of Johnson & Johnson once said: “Life has an overall purpose. Men must judge their conduct, not merely in terms of personal gain or convenience, but also as right or wrong."

 

So, as we take and sustain action, it must always be preceded by four activities that, when performed in sequence, will ensure the change we are trying to make doesn't get derailed and actually results in the kind of growth we're looking for. 


First: Establishing Virtues as Values is critical for a number of reasons. First, it allows you to remember what is really important in your life. Second, it gives you the opportunity to recall any changes in your thinking that took shape during the first two enrichment steps (e.g., Life-long Learning and Internal Locus of Control). In all likelihood you made some adjustments. Finally, it ensures that motives (precedes action) and ends (follows action) are carefully considered before you engage the means (take action), and all three will place your actions in the direction of right or wrong.

 

Second: We started change planning in the last Leadership Enrichment step, but Vision and Strategy is where we complete that plan so we can start taking action. This includes the selection of both long-term strategies and short-term actions to accomplish your Vision of Potential. In this step of the action-sequence, all actions are timed to be set in motion such that progress can be measured against specific targets along the way. In other words, this is goal-setting for goal-getting, the latter of which we’ll expand on in the next installment.

 

Third: Ensuring the right systemic and structural fundamentals are in place to support the strategy and ensure your actions are effective and efficient is what the Support Structures step in the action-sequence is all about. This includes abandoning what doesn’t (or won’t) work as much as it means adopting new approaches. I find the failure to abandon ineffective habits, practices, methods and models, as well as useless theories more difficult, almost to a person. We tend to get hidebound to our own way of doing things and this holds us back. This is where, in specific terms, you get to decide on what you must stop doing, do differently or start doing in order to be successful.

 

Fourth: Having the right Skills to pull of the changes we intend to make is important. The fact is, we're just not equipped to take action without them. Identifying and resolving skill deficiencies, in a very real sense, improves our starting point and will ensure all follow-on activities are successful.

 

Following this approach will help us avoid the negative consequences of failing to think the process through before working it out. These consequences include false starts, missteps, confusion, frustration, anxiety, et al. It also ensures that the actions we take will produce real growth.

 

But there are some challenges.

 

The first challenge is that, while growing is a natural process, the type of growth we’re after often doesn't come easy. The LEL-c is specifically designed to make growth as real leaders easier and more systematic. And it requires that we adopt what Carol Dweck calls a Growth Mindset. According to an editorial review on Amazon by Publishers Weekly, “Dweck proposes [in her new book: Mindset: The New Psychology of Success], that everyone has either a “fixed” mindset or a “growth” mindset. A fixed mindset is one in which you view your talents and abilities as...well, fixed. In other words, you are who you are, your intelligence and talents are fixed, and your fate is to go through life avoiding challenge and failure. A growth mindset on the other hand is one in which you see yourself as fluid and adaptable; a work in progress. Your fate is one of growth and opportunity.” I would replace the word ‘fate’ with ‘future’ but, other than that, I couldn't agree more.

 

The second challenge is that the kind of growth we get isn't always desirable. Edward Abbey once quipped: “Growth for the sake of growth is the ideology of the cancer cell.” He is spot-on. We've likely all had occasion to observe in ourselves and in others, undesirable growth. If we cultivate the wrong things in the wrong way and for the wrong reasons, things will continue to go wrong and we’ll grow in ways that do not enrich leadership.

Our growth is locked in a cause-effect relationship with the energy we cultivate through our actions. Growth in the context of enriching our leadership means we have acted rightly on worthwhile changes and, as a result, have grown in appropriate ways….in maturity, influence, acceptability and attractiveness. Following the action-sequence model and being mindful of the two primary challenges to growth will prepare us for the fourth and final step of the LEL-c: Excellence.

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Leadership Enrichment - Part 1 of 4; The Value of (Un)Learning

Leadership Enrichment - Part 1 of 4; The Value of (Un)Learning | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Real Leadership! Are You Ready?: Rethinking and reframing personal and organizational potential and performance by Richard S. Dillard
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

When thinking back over years of consulting, coaching and mentoring on Leadership in a variety of organizational and personal contexts, there are a number of observations that truly stand out. Some as conspicuous by presence; like the old science (e.g., Taylor, Skinner, et al.) of hierarchical command and control models that many organizations still use to "manage the business" and the value of each position it promotes. Others, however, as conspicuous by absence; like the new science (e.g., Deming, Kohn, et al.) of leadership as a means of improving the operating culture and effectiveness in many organizations and the value of each person it promotes.

 

Unfortunately, our ability to learn, unlearn and relearn, organizationally and personally, falls into the conspicuous by absence category of stand-out observations. And I can't say this without feeling some level of sincere trepidation. Having moved through 41 different professional and social leadership roles, including 31 unique positions with 16 organizations spanning 12 career fields and seven industries in the commercial sector and 10 positions with seven organizations in the national defense and non-profit sectors, I've had to contend with more than a "fair share" of learning, unlearning and relearning over the past 30 years. To say it's was hard or that I hadn't always been successful in the endeavor would be gross understatements.

In reality, this learn-unlearn-relearn cycle has proven, at times, to be extremely difficult...I've got the scars to prove it. But it is also indispensable to changing, growing and leading in our fields (as individuals) and in the competitive marketplace (as organizations).

 

Between the three, the most difficult, by far, is unlearning...really letting go of old habits, outdated theories, flawed assumptions/ biases, etc. Tragically, it also happens to be the most useful. Unlearning enables us to take new information--most times running contrary to what we already believe and, if it is about us, coming in the form of feedback that isn't very flattering or gratifying--and use it to relearn, change our behavior or improve our performance. Otherwise, we continue to learn new things without ever unlearning (e.g., abandoning the old), and this creates a real quandary when the new information is incompatible or irreconcilable. At best, we relearn nothing at all or, at worst, we complicate and confuse things by introducing incongruity. Here's just one example of how this plays out with leadership, both personal and organizational:

 

Personal Leadership Context: We attend a great seminar, read a great book, even listen to an inspirational, motivational speech but we don't take it personally and fail to act in any meaningful or demonstrable way to produce a change in our leadership.Organizational Leadership Context: We cherry-pick a new method or model for leadership that conflicts with an old method or model and simply add it to the mix, never removing the old model.

 

Myriad examples exist in both contexts, but there's no room to include them here. Anyone beyond their formal academic years who has dared to challenge their beliefs and assumptions about management and leadership will know first hand how difficult and important unlearning is, so it likely doesn't warrant further explanation. Perhaps Chuck Swindoll captured it best when he said something to this effect in one of his epic sermons a few years back: it takes only four years to get a college education but forty years to get over it or, if you please, it is just as offensive to be around someone who never changes their mind as someone who never changes their clothes.

This is why Lifelong-Learning is the first step in the LIFE-cycle of Leadership Enrichment. I'll reveal the other 3 steps in future posts, but for now I'd like to offer of few hints to fellow travelers on how to increase your capacity for learning, unlearning and relearning:

 

Elevate your Awareness. Enabled by alertness and emboldened by curiosity, awareness ensures we are able to understand our situation, identify the right target/ goals and achieve learning on purpose. It is the means by which we perceive (to mentally understand using the powers of reason) and recognize "new information." This will open the door to learning and then acceptance, as a vital part of unlearning.Increase your Openness -- to -- Learning. As we become aware of new information regarding our leadership and the leadership in your organization, we can use this scale at The Hendricks Institute to evaluate where our thinking is currently positioned. It will help us make the transition/ commitment moves that shift our learning away from "stonewalling, explaining, justifying, withdrawing, blaming" toward acceptance and, ultimately, into unlearning and relearning.Adopt the PDSA Learning Cycle. This "...systematic series of steps for gaining valuable learning and knowledge" begins by formulating a theory. Being guided by theory is incredibly important because it helps us to frame the right questions up-front...questions about how this new information compares with your current level of thinking. Moving through the PDSA yields the answers to those questions and provides more forgiveness in the learning, unlearning and relearning effort because we can ultimately "...adjust the goal, change methods or even reformulate a theory altogether."

 

Taken in order, these three simple strategies can help you learn, unlearn and relearn on a continual basis, which will kick-start your leadership enrichment. But it doesn't come without risk. You'll be: (a) forced to confront congenital blindness to your own defects; (b) tempted to take short-cuts, pick only low-hanging fruit and superficially address the real issues; and (c) tied to old paradigms that establish and define clear boundaries and reinforce your current behavior inside those boundaries. That said, it also comes with its share of rewards...not the least of which is your potential for becoming a real leader, having a more constructive impact on others, and improving the organizational context/ operating culture that emerges to produce overall effectiveness.

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Simon Sinek: These Are the 3 Most Valuable Leadership Traits

The best-selling author explains why these simple qualities make for the most effective leaders.
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

I agree that selflessness, empathy and grace under fire are all important for leaders, but there are a couple essential ingredients in a leaders character needed to develop and maintain these traits: Humility and Sacrifice. Find a leader with genuine humility (not low self-esteem aped by humility) and the moral courage to perform the sacred (making tough, but right decision, taking pains with the hard issues, etc.) and you will find these traits.

 

Real Leadership is about developing the character--a solid footing and stable foundation--to undergird and support the traits you may select as the framing of your leadership platform.  Are You Ready?

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Stop Honking! Start Leading!

Stop Honking! Start Leading! | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it

Ever work with someone who constantly approaches daily teamwork like an irritated driver sitting in their car honking the horn while you are trying to get your car started? I continue to be amazed how subtle it is and perplexed by how often it occurs. And how we've become so immune to it we don't even recognize when it's occurring or how damaging it can be to personal, group, and organizational performance.

 

Here's just one example: How often do we talk about teams but then get irritated because we feel we are "doing someone else's job?" If we were on a high performance work team, there would be no such complaints...no "horn-honking." We'd know what each member of the team is responsible for and work to enable every other member of the team in the performance of their work. Enabling others certainly starts by fulfilling our own responsibilities for the good of the team and avoiding all forms of dirty-delegation, but it also includes stepping up and stepping in, when needed, to help our teammates with their work...with "getting their car started."

 

This is basic to Real Leadership! Are You Ready? 

 

Take your hand off the horn, get out of the car and grab your jumper cables the next time a teammate needs help starting their car. At the end of the day, teams are only as fast as their slowest member and bad things begin to happen when we forget that.   

Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

If we're serious about creating high performance work teams and elevating teamwork in our organizations, then we must be equally concerned with leadership. In writing this, I was reminded of many examples from my 30+ years of experience in the United States Marine Corps, United States Air Force and numerous commercial organizations where we performed well simply because this basic leadership principle of enabling others was being practiced by everyone on the team.

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A Father's 10 Lessons about Leadership

A Father's 10 Lessons about Leadership | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Today is Father's Day, a time we set aside to honor fathers and the role fatherhood plays in our society. Being the father of two boys (Michael 22, Matthew 18) is one of the greatest joys of my lif...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

Perhaps the shortest of all my thoughts on leadership, but the most vital I've ever written.  This Father's Day I was reminded of how much my leadership platform has been influenced by three Godly men: 1) my Dad, Tommy Eugene Dillard (1934-1974), 2) my Uncle, Kenneth Lawrence Petrosky and 3) my Father-in-Law, Eugene Anthony Hoffman.  These are the most Real Leaders I'll ever know, and I'm incredibly blessed by and far better for their right and effective models of Servant Leadership in the home.  And my debt of gratitude to them will be paid forward through the legacy of Real Leadership I leave with my four Daughters.  Some are blessed to have one Dad.  A few are blessed to have two.  I've had three.  May I be the Real Leader these men invested themselves in creating by the power of their character and daily example.  

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3 Priorities for Leaders Who Want to Go Beyond Command-and ...

3 Priorities for Leaders Who Want to Go Beyond Command-and ... | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
It's cliché to say that “command and control” leadership is no longer relevant in most organizational contexts. But — especially in large, global, diverse organizations — what should it be replaced with?
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

The author's of this HBR article suggest that "command and control" leadership should be replaced with "...inspiration and purpose, adaptability and engagement, and authenticity." 

 

While I can support these 3 ideas as being both valid and useful for leaders, they are not suitable replacements for "command and control" as they don't address the antecedents that actually produce the operating culture of an organization. For example, you can be authentic, corall your organization around a common purpose, inspire confidence in the results and promote adaptability and engagement but still rely on "command and control" methods, models and theories that govern how people should approach one another and their daily work (e.g., the operating culture). 

 

If you really want to replace "command and control," you must go to work on the management systems, structures, and technology in the organization, as well as the skills & qualities of leaders.  According to the Human Synergistics International (HSI) model for "How Culture Works" (http://www.humansynergistics.com/Files/HTML5/HowCultureWorks/index.html) these represent the causal factors of operating culture and, as a result, they become the only real levers for change.

 

Lastly, W. Edwards Deming told us a long time ago: "The prevailing style of management must undergo transformation." By this he was referring to "command and control." But he didn't stop there, he also gave us the means of replacement: "A system cannot understand itself. The transformation requires a view from outside." And that view is only possible through the lense of Profound Knowledge. Then he gave us the means: 14 Points to begin and sustain the transformation and the 7 Deadly Diseases to avoid in the journey.

 

With the How Culture Works model from HSI and Deming's System of Profound Knowledge, 14 Points and 7 Deadly Diseases in your Real Leadership toolbox, the only thing that's required is the courage to act on it for your organization. Are you ready?   

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7 Essential Qualities of All Great Leaders

Click here http://www.briantracy.com/wealthreport to receive my FREE REPORT: The Way to Wealth! There are 7 leadership qualities that all great leaders posse...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

Do you have (1) Vision; (2) Courage; (3) Integrity; (4) Humility; (5) Strategic Planning; (6) Focus; (7) Cooperation...the 7 leadership qualities that all great leaders possess?  Before answering, consider these 7 qualities in the context of Real Leadership:

 

(1) Vision (of personal and organizational potential...thanks Dr. J. Clayton Lafferty); 

(2) Perseverence (courage stretched out...thanks Tim Hansel);

(3) Character (who you are in the dark...thanks Dwight L. Moody);

(4) Humility (carrying the weight of glory for each person that chooses to follow your lead...thanks C. S. Lewis);

(5) Strategy (flexing with a future in flux...thanks Chuck Swindoll);

(6) Focus (on fixing the system...not on fixing the blame; on efforts...not just on results...thanks Dr. W. Edwards Deming);

(7) Cooperation (the case against internal competition...thanks Alfie Kohn).  

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Teamwork: 3 Cornerstones of the “Top 1% of the 1%” -- Lessons from the U.S. ... - Business 2 Community

Teamwork: 3 Cornerstones of the “Top 1% of the 1%” -- Lessons from the U.S. ... - Business 2 Community | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Business 2 Community
Teamwork: 3 Cornerstones of the “Top 1% of the 1%” -- Lessons from the U.S. ...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

The article really points up one of the biggest areas for improvement when it comes to performance: giving our teams the opportunity, on a regular basis, to practice as a team.  This simple aspect is conspicuous by absence in many organizations. 

 

Sure...they set up teams and talk about teamwork and post motivational team posters all over the walls. 

 

In the end, however, they never fill up or free up the teams to be successful or effective when it comes to striving for consensus-driven, synergistic decisions or exercising the essential balance of interpersonal, task and rational skills as they approach one another in their pursuit of a goal or objective.

 

If you are tempted to question that, riddle me this. When was the last time you were able to "practice' making decisions or solving problems as a team using a simulation or challenge exercise?  If we're honest, many of us would say: "There was this one time..." or "It's been a few years, but...", and herein lies the rub.  All of us are still expected to work together as a high-performance work team and make effective decisions for the organizations, groups and individuals we serve. 

 

To reward 'A' (a system where teams can't practice) and expect 'B' (outcomes where teams make effective decisions) is management folly. 

 

There is an old saying: "If you want someone to do a good job, give them a good job to do"  Well, if you want your teams to perform better, give them a chance to practice.  The Group Styles Inventory (GSI) and Team Building Simulations from Human Synergistics International (http://humansynergistics.com/) are great places to start.

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5 Lessons I learned About Leadership as a Sergeant in the Israeli Army

5 Lessons I learned About Leadership as a Sergeant in the Israeli Army | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
The vital lessons learned during my time in Israel have shaped the person I am today as well as the leadership approach I take with all teams I manage.
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

Best quote: "If I had to sum up my experience in one sentence, I’d have to say it was learning how much can be accomplished when everyone acknowledges and recognizes the support of the team around them, for without your team, you are nothing."

 

AGREED!  On a high-performance work team, everyone can (and will) lead at some point...depending on the mission/ objective and the individual skills/ qualities required throughout the process of accomplishing it.  And there all no self-appointed leaders; "Leader" is a title given only by the appointment of those who choose to follow your lead...and YOU MUST EARN IT!

 

These ideas are central to Real Leaders.  In part 1 of Real Leadership! Are You Ready?, I spend a lot of time on simply rethinking and reframing leadership along lines like this because a balanced focus between self and others provides the necessary backdrop for part 2 and the Leadership Enrichment LIFE-cycle.  Without a better understanding of what Leadership is/ is not, there is no way to become a Real Leader. 

 

Check it out: http://www.ready4realleadership.com.

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Building a personal leadership style - Wake Forest University News Center

Building a personal leadership style - Wake Forest University News Center | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Wake Forest University News Center Building a personal leadership style Wake Forest University News Center In the high-pressure world of professional sports, where aggressiveness is often seen as a sign of a strong leader, Super Bowl-winning coach...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

Want to know what Real Leadership looks like?  It looks like Coach Dungy. 

 

"Whether leading a sports team, a team of colleagues or a family, [Super Bowl-winning Coach Tony Dungy] believes in building up rather than breaking down and putting others first....Dungy puts the coach on the bottom and the players at the top. The message to the team is that the coach supports the structure, and the leaders are everywhere in the organization....Separate yourself from the crowd by helping people. If your motivation is to make a difference in others, you’re always going to shine.”

 

In my latest book: Real Leadership! Are You Ready?, I prescribe the hard but essential development effort that is required to produce the type of personal and organizational success that Coach Dungy enjoys.  It awaits anyone who is willing to learn, change and grow, but will only come at the speed of leadership.

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Robertson High producing leaders - Fremont Bulletin

Robertson High producing leaders - Fremont Bulletin | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Robertson High producing leaders Fremont Bulletin The effect the program has had on the leadership students at Robertson as well the general population has been a dramatic shift in the campus culture, sowing changes in the students' academia and...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

I love to see programs like this in secondary education.  Leadership is a subject that should be explored early and often throughout our academic careers. 

 

In fact, one of the things I've routinely observed by working with youth in high school, as well as young adults, is that while they may have developed a learning-orientation through years of school and are very willing to accept what they become aware of, they don't know how to act on the new information they are given in order to achieve higher levels of performance as a real leader. 

 

In contrast, the older, more mature professionals I've worked with for the past 30 years tend to have a well-developed action-orientation, but they don't change or grow because they have actually stopped learning a long time ago.  In other words, all their actions today are based on the actions of yesterday...we call that experience.  And while experience can offer some extremely memorable lessons, it is a poor teacher because it forces you to take the test before revealing the lesson. 

 

I once heard Chuck Swindoll quip that it takes some people 4 years to get a college degree and 40 years to get over it.  I believe he was referring to the idea that it can take a while to unlearn some of the wrong-headed ideas and outright falsehoods that are routinely taught as good and true in the textbooks used in modern educational curriculum and, if he was, he could have also been pointing up the fact that many people stop learning as soon as they get the degree or diploma. 

 

Anyone can get a degree by learning about science, art, sociology, math, et al., and these are all worthwhile subjects.  Leadership, on the other hand, asks the student to learn about themselves through coaches, mentors, and myriad non-neutral opportunities available each day as we interact with one another.  This means that we can avoid the trap of over-reliance on experience as our teacher and begin to learn from the experiences of others.  And not just from our coaches and mentors, but from those who we impact on a regular basis through our approach to work, study and play.  All we have to do is elevate our awareness to these incredible learning opportunities, and programs like this at Robertson High go a long way in facilitating that process.  

 

In science class we learn about the scientific method and it's importance in the discovery process.  In math class we learn about probability and statistics and how important they are in the evaluation process.  In leadership class, we should be learning about the Leadership Enrichment LIFE-cycle and its importance in elevating our level of leadership toward constructive, long-term, and sustainable value delivery for and with others.  Leadership must first become personal; it's a real inside job as we begin to learn, change, grow and lead through awareness, acceptance, action and achievement.

 

Leadership is better caught than taught, and there is no better time or place to begin catching it than in our youth.  In fact, much of what I wrote about in Real Leadership! Are You Ready? was caught from my mentors over the years.

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Leadership Platforms -- The Goal of Enrichment

Leadership Platforms -- The Goal of Enrichment | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
I’ll readily admit, this appealed to my deep desire to leave a legacy of positive change in the world…something I would laughingly refer to as my “legacy complex.” I also have to admit that I knew ...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

Here's the latest installment on Leadership Enrichment!

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Leadership Enrichment - Part 4 of 4; The Value of Leading

Leadership Enrichment - Part 4 of 4; The Value of Leading | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Real Leadership! Are You Ready?: Rethinking and reframing personal and organizational potential and performance by Richard S. Dillard
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

The third step of Fulfillment ultimately brings us to a final step in the Leadership Enrichment LIFE-cycle (LEL-c): EXCELLENCE. Nowhere else does our focus on becoming a better leader in relation to others become more important; for a couple of reasons. First, it is extremely easy to forget or overlook our own intrinsic worth and value and thus to place too much reference on others in the wrong way (e.g., approval orientation). Second, it is equally easy to lose perspective and place insufficient reference on others, forgetting that they are central and basic to moving upward and outward with passion, patience and perseverance to create or achieve something of value for and with others--the very etymology of leadership. Because this Enrichment Stage includes Achievement that yields to Leading in ways and with means never before available to us, we’ll need to keep a wary eye on our impact as we pursue Excellence.

 

When I think of achievement, three primary contributors come to mind: Dr. J. Clayton Lafferty (Roots of Excellence), Brian Tracy (Psychology of Achievement) and Dr. Jim Loehr (Mental Toughness). I’ve made investments in, and successfully reaped rewards from, each one over the years. Phenomenal works! And I still find myself referring back to them for refreshers.

 

But for tracking achievement from a personal thinking style to group styles to organizational culture and effectiveness, no one had it figured out like Dr. Lafferty at Human Synergistics International® (HSI). Clay, as he was known by many, believed “Personal Effectiveness Builds on Achievement.” After years of research, he found that thought sequences in achievement (i.e., our achievement-orientation) correlate strongly with personal effectiveness. Individuals who think in achievement-oriented terms are "…more effective, reach higher salary levels, experience less stress and physical illness, and are generally more respected by their peers as having accomplished something."

 

For all of this, perhaps the most significant contribution to my leadership development and overall approach to elevating organizational leadership were a handful of ideas about achievement that Dr. Lafferty shared in The Roots of Excellence, a video that truly changed things for me and the organizations I serve:

 

     Passion for Personal Excellence 

     Belief in Cause and Effect 

     Belief in the Idea that Individual Efforts Count

     Moderate Risk Taking

     Desire and Design for Feedback 

 

The 1987 video is extremely rare and hard to obtain, since it is no longer being produced. So for anyone wanting to dig a little deeper, I'd refer you to my book: Real Leadership! Are You Ready? where I decompose and clarify each idea.

 

In the final analysis, achievement is about celebrating private victory before heralding public victory (Covey) and recognizing that humility comes before honor (Solomon), or as one man quipped: “Independence precedes interdependence.” You must first have in order to then give. In terms of Leadership Enrichment, excellence in achievement (a personal/ internal work) will ultimately produce achievement in excellence (an organizational/ external result).

 

No one understands this better than servant leaders. This particular type of leader recognizes that they are the subject of leadership while clearly maintaining a resolute focus on others as the object of leadership. They first attend to becoming better at who they are and what they do, and only then focus on what they do for and with others. After all, one must first have in order to give, and this process of “giving themselves away” yields new opportunities to lead at levels never before available. Here's how it works.

 

Doing the right things the right way (e.g., extremely well) for others is the core of service, and it requires the heart of a servant. Being effective at doing the right things with others, however, as they opt-in voluntarily and begin to follow your lead, automatically introduces economies of scale, skill and scope which were previously not there, and this new achievement unleashes the potential for greater, more positive and long-term impact. This is the core of leadership, and it requires the heart of a leader. Together, the servant (for others) and leader (with others) powerfully combine to fully enable others to become Servants, and then give away the best versions of themselves as Leaders for and with others.

 

ervant leadership is based on what some have called the “follower principle”: Good Followers Make the Best Leaders. So goes one title of Michael McKinney’sLeadingBLOG posts. Michael writes: "There is no better way to learn leadership than by being under someone else—leading from the second chair. As ironic as that may sound, it’s true. Learning to lead under someone else provides you with the opportunity (the necessity) to learn to lead without coercion. You learn to let your leadership speak for itself—authentically."

 

Taking this a step farther—because I’m not certain it was Michael’s original intent—I believe there is an inextricable link/connection between Leader-Follower-Servant. Leaders serve! Servants follow! Followers lead! I also believe this works if stated a little differently: Leaders follow! Followers serve! Servants lead!

 

I believe that it is safe to say then, that there is no practical difference between leaders and servants; at least not when it comes to the kind and degree of sacrifice required to secure right and effective leadership and produce positive long-term results. Those who want their leadership to thrive and transform their organizations will sacrifice and serve. Those who truly serve will be capable of leading, be appointed by others to lead, and be recognized as having a positive impact on those around them.

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Leadership Enrichment - Part 2 of 4; The Value of Changing

Leadership Enrichment - Part 2 of 4; The Value of Changing | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Real Leadership! Are You Ready?: Rethinking and reframing personal and organizational potential and performance by Richard S. Dillard
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

In the first installment of this 4-part series on Leadership Enrichment, we addressed the idea that elevating our awareness and increasing our openness to learning can produce higher levels of knowledge through a commitment to Life-Long Learning...step one in the LIFE-cycle. Here is where we will focus on using the knowledge we've gained to make decisions regarding what aspects of our personal and organizational Leadership Platforms can and should CHANGE. This is vital because, at the end of the day, we can gain a ton of knowledge and still have nothing to do (e.g., the knowing-doing gap). Ever been there?

 

If you have, you know that the inherent challenge we're addressing here is related to the sheer difficulty of change. In fact, it has been said that “no one likes change except a wet baby.” – Anonymous. Regardless, initiating and planning change is inescapable if we are to enrich our leadership.

 

To do this, we need to understand what precipitates change. One antecedent is necessity, which is a forcing function that reduces our intrinsic motivation to operating from desperation. Another is contingency, which is a freeing function that enables us to operate from inspiration. Sometimes, change is a matter of both functions. As William Pollard observed, “Those who initiate change will have a better opportunity to manage the change that is inevitable.”

So here we are concerned with initiating and planning worthwhile changes based on what we have learned about our current level of leadership thinking, behavior and/or performance. This automatically places us in the area of operating from contingency, not necessity, which is far better motivation.

 

Spend any time in or around the high-performance/high-precision world of defensive tactics for law enforcement or military (MOUT) applications, and you’ll inevitably learn they are driven by a common belief that, in a crisis situation, no one rises to the occasion; rather everyone defaults to the level of their thinking. As a result of this belief, they initiate and plan a lot of activities for developing mental toughness and the right combative mindset through adrenaline stress conditioning and force-on-force (i.e., live-action, reality-based situations) training in order to be better prepared for the worst that their jobs/ missions regularly throw at them.

 

Personality psychology suggests that this level of thinking and training captures the essence of individuals with high Internal Locus of Control...the second step in the LIFE-cycle for Leadership Enrichment. These are people who believe that events result primarily from their own behavior and actions—that individual efforts count—while those with high external locus of control believe that powerful others, fate or chance primarily determine events.

 

And this is empirically verifiable. As a United States Marine, retired Airman, former Public Safety Officer and current Combatives Student (always) and Instructor (sometimes), I've had the privilege of being around men and women who have incredible control of their thoughts and behavior...so much so that they have removed the words “luck,” “fate,” “chance” and “magic” from their vocabulary. But this characteristic is not unique to law enforcement or the military. I've seen it equally present in a few corporate athletes that I've had the privilege of working with over the past 30 years.

 

When considering the litany of attributes these individuals have in common, certainly among the highest on the list is their ability to change...to improvise, overcome and adapt in ways that produce growth in all the right areas. And if we are genuinely interested in developing this kind of change-ability, we need to get serious about embracing the idea of Acceptance.

 

This is more important than space here will afford, but I do want to underscore that the idea of acceptance doesn’t mean we have to change, it means we can change. It means our energy is available to us, when we need it, to change what we want about ourselves and our organizations. To that end, here are a couple of guidelines from the Human Synergistics International® (HSI) Life Styles Inventory™ (LSI) Self-Development Guide; guidelines they suggest are essential to our change-ability:


Acknowledge and accept all aspects of yourself. Remember, the question is not “Am I a good or bad person?” but rather “What is preventing me from being more effective, and what can I do to improve?” Recognize that your sense of self-worth is not connected to your scores. You are worthwhile because you are a human being—tying your self-worth to outside factors can limit your ability to make positive changes in yourself.


Acceptance will demand great courage if we are to change in worthwhile ways on the basis of what we’ve learned about our leadership, whether from a formal LSI or from less formal feedback mechanisms. Personally, if we are committed to closing the leadership knowing-doing gap, we must reject the lies that we are tempted to tell ourselves, begin calling into question our long-standing values, presuppositions and beliefs and go about the hard work of initiating and planning changes. If we are committed to closing the leadership knowing-doing gap organizationally, we must recognize the leadership—culture connection, hardwire improvement as a strategic priority and incorporate both elements through a systems approach into our change strategies.

 

But stay tuned! Now that we have exercised the courage to accept what we have learned and have initiated and planned the changes in our platforms that are worthwhile, in the next installment we'll need to address the vital third step in the Leadership Enrichment LIFE-cycle that moves us from thinking to knowing, from knowing to doing and from doing to performing.

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What’s Next in Leadership? ‘Enriching” Employees to Unleash Their Potential

What’s Next in Leadership? ‘Enriching” Employees to Unleash Their Potential | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
There’s no way around it – being a leader is tough. It’s hard and it’s getting harder. The complexity and pace of business today makes it virtually impossible to keep up, let alone …
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

I love Michelle's use of words "Enriching" and "Potential" in the context of leadership. In fact, I've used them myself when creating the Leadership Enrichment LIFE-cycle as part of the work that led to my latest book: "Real Leadership! Are You Ready?," which carries the subtitle: Rethinking & Reframing | Personal & Organizational | Potential and Performance. Leaders have a significant impact on others. And each of us have the privilege and responsibility of creating the context for those who will chose to follow our lead...that's part of being a leader and we should never forget, as Michelle says, that this can't be delegated.

 

What are you doing to enrich your leadership and, through the context you set, enrich the lives of others to unleash their potential.

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4 Lessons Every Business Leader Can Learn From Legendary Marine General ... - Business Insider

4 Lessons Every Business Leader Can Learn From Legendary Marine General ... - Business Insider | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Business Insider
4 Lessons Every Business Leader Can Learn From Legendary Marine General ...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

Spot on! The only thing I could add is with regard to his fourth lesson on organizational culture. While I agree with and understand what General Mattis is saying, “[Culture] is whatever the seniors say it is” doesn't go far enough. It's not what the seniors "say," rather it is who the seniors "are" and what the seniors "do" that counts. The operating culture will always be determined by the actual impact that senior leaders have (driven by behaviors) on others, regardless of what they intended (driven by messages). And farther back, these behaviors are driven by the thinking styles of seniors, which brings us inexorably back to their personal platform and who they really are as leaders.

 

This is always the case, but never more evident than in situations where the chips are down. As the leadership axiom goes; in a crisis situation you won't rise to the occasion, you'll default to the level of your thinking. I think General Mattis, with more room to exposit his thoughts on leadership, would agree.

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The Leadership Glory of Being a Great No. 2 - Forbes

The Leadership Glory of Being a Great No. 2 - Forbes | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
The Leadership Glory of Being a Great No. 2
Forbes
Don't settle for second place, says almost every leadership writer out there. Correct, Richard Hytner would respond. Rather than settling for it, embrace it, love it, glory in it.
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

Here, again, I think we get caught up in the wrong-headed idea that, somehow, leadership corresponds to our position or rank. What else can you conclude from the title of this article in Forbes? In spite of this all-to-popular notion, the reality is that you can have a CEO who isn't leading and a Janitor who is leading in the very same company. It all goes back to how we define "leadership." To that end, I believe it's high time we forget the ranking, whether by numbers (i.e., 1, 2, 3, etc.) or the alphabet (e.g., a, b, c, etc.) and start rethinking and reframing personal and organizational potential and performance. And if you're the least bit curious or ready to consider an alternative to what you've always thought about leadership--in part because of articles like this--pick up Real Leadership! Are You Ready? 

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Leadership WalkRounds – a great thing? | Center for Patient Safety

Leadership WalkRounds – a great thing? | Center for Patient Safety | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Wait a minute, not if there is no follow through on identified issues. If that's the case, front line staff may become more cynical and perceptions of safety culture may actually worsen according to a recent study of 44 neonatal ...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

One of the first things I always recommend, whether to Executives that I'm coaching or Organizations I'm consulting, to truly ignite a constructive shift in the culture, is the practice of "management by walking around," or as Quint Studer put it in Hardwiring Excellence: "rounding for employee outcomes."  But as this article points out, this simple practice is anything but easy because it requires follow-through on ideas for improvement or removal of challenges and obstacles to successful work. 

 

That late Dr. J. Clayton Lafferty, founder of Human Synergistics International, once said: "Any manager who successfully communicates to his or her people that their effort in talking isn't going to pay off is unaffordable in business."  One of the quickest ways to communicate to your organization that their effort in talking to you isn't paying off is to ask and not act...to listen and not respond. 

 

If you don't have any intention (or better yet, a solid plan/ approach in place) of responding to the answers you are given, don't bother asking the questions.  Additionally, if your response is going to be anything but constructive (e.g., dismissive or, worse yet, passive/ aggressive defensive where blame is fixed rather than the system), don't bother leaving your office.  In either case, you'd be far better off with putting a "suggestion box" outside your door and asking people to stick their ideas and problems there, which is akin to asking them to "park their brains at the door." 

 

In either case, this would be reflective of what I call wrong and ineffective leadership in my latest book: Real Leadership! Are You Ready?  In contrast, right and effective leaders know that simple doesn't mean easy, but they are willing to take pains and respond nonetheless in constructive ways.  Guided by theories like Deming's Profound Knowledge and 14 Points and tools like Lafferty's Circumplicial Integrated Change Model, they recognize the real power in developing a keen "sense and respond" capability as part of their Personal and Organizational Leadership Platform.  They also realize, as Meg Wheatley spoke about in Leadership and the New Science, that relationships are the only real conduit for the exchange of information in organizations and, in the process of working together in constructive ways, we can truly create a new vision for the organization. 

 

Think about it.  If people in your organization no longer want to talk to one another, it really doesn't matter at the end of the day how sophisticated your information systems are, how you manage BIG DATA or employ knowledge management tools or even how well you train people to be better communicators.  All the information that is available to you from intellectual capital remains locked in the storage unit, whether IT systems (explicit knowledge) or human systems (tacit knowledge).  

 

And if you are looking for a solid approach to sense and respond, consider the Leadership Enrichment LIFE-cycle I offer in Part II of my book: Real Leadership! Are You Ready?  It is designed to help you learn, change, grow and lead through awareness, acceptance, action and achievement.

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Unit Effectiveness Inspections going AF-wide - AirForceTimes.com

Unit Effectiveness Inspections going AF-wide AirForceTimes.com Airmen can expect more short-notice reviews and a constant focus on readiness under the new Unit Effectiveness Inspection program scheduled to be in place throughout the Air Force by...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

How great is this: "...our focus was/is changing the culture to where we do not have to prepare for inspections; it should show in our daily mission readiness.”  YES!  Exactly how it should be.  Leaders should establish a constructive culture whereby overall individual, group and organizational effectiveness is a natural outcome.  Over time, with Real Leaders putting the right systems, structures, technologies and skills/ qualities (e.g., the antecedents of organizational culture) in place, USAF Units should be able to cease dependence on inspections as a means of ensuring readiness. 

 

If successful, the USAF could be well on their way to what my good friend Dave Guerra calls SUPERPERFORMANCE...the polar complementarity of culture (i.e., Leadership) and process (i.e., Management). 

 

And the best part is, there are statistically valid instruments for assessing organizational culture (OCI by Human Synergistics) and organizational effectiveness (OEI by Human Synergistics).  All that's left is for the USAF to measure and improve the "causes" (leadership and culture) through assessment of the "effect" (effectiveness and readiness) they intend to measure and improve by inspection.

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Reveal Yourself And Others Will Follow - Authentic Leadership - Forbes

Reveal Yourself And Others Will Follow - Authentic Leadership - Forbes | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Reveal Yourself And Others Will Follow - Authentic Leadership
Forbes
Jennifer Petrigliere: So, traditionally in leadership studies, we tend to focus on styles or actions of leaders, which of course are important.
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

"...as a leader in this day-and-age, it’s very important to be more personable, to reveal more aspects of yourself and not just to be the thing that people can see."  In Real Leadership! Are You Ready?, I talk about leadership becoming personal before it ever becomes organizational.  In other words, if you expect others to appoint you as their leader or choose to follow your lead, you must become someone worthy of following.  Authentic Leadership is the term used in this article, and it rests on the strength of your character and the authority of your example more than the strength of your position or the authority of your rank/ title.

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7 ways hospitals build leadership development programs - FierceHealthcare

7 ways hospitals build leadership development programs - FierceHealthcare | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
7 ways hospitals build leadership development programs FierceHealthcare Lehigh Valley Health Network, an academic community hospital in Pennsylvania with five hospital campuses and almost 13,000 employees, created a two-year leadership program that...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

John Maxwell once quipped: "Everything rises and falls on leadership!"  Never is that more apparent than in establishing a Leadership Development program.  In the natural order of things, Senior Leaders within the organization must establish a culture where future leaders can develop and ultimately improve individual, group and organizational performance.

 

As it turns out, this is a very tall order to fill and simply doesn't happen all that often, which might explain a great deal about the lackluster performance of many organizations today.

 

In Real Leadership! Are You Ready?, I present it this way:

 

“From the pen of Louis Finkelstein comes this morsel of truth: ‘Wisdom begins with sacrifice of immediate pleasures for long-range purposes.’....These concepts of leadership have been around for years, yet we still have trouble swallowing or digesting this counsel as part of our leadership diet. Why is that?

 

“Ronald Wright gets credit for this in A Short History of Progress, but his progress trap idea may provide a central reason for why many never make the leap:

 

“In a progress trap, those in positions of authority are unwilling to make changes necessary for future survival. To do so they would need to sacrifice their current status and political power at the top of a hierarchy. (Wikipedia)

 

“Perhaps this explains why many leaders (and their organizations) reach a performance plateau. Mired in past success (accumulated while climbing the corporate ladder) and trapped by a desire to maintain position in the hierarchy, those at the top become unwilling to sacrifice status and power. As a result, empowerment to renew and improve dries up, yesterday’s solutions become today’s problems, low hanging fruit grows back and all upward and outward movement grinds to a halt.”

 

Thankfully, it appears this healthcare system has a Senior Leadership Team that is willing to make the personal sacrifice.  Yes...Real Leadership must first become personal before it can ever become organizational.

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Breaking bad leadership - Jakarta Post

Breaking bad leadership - Jakarta Post | Real Leadership! Are You Ready? | Scoop.it
Breaking bad leadership
Jakarta Post
We have known for a long time that leaders need to continue to learn throughout their careers. About 50 years ago, US President John F.
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

If you truly want to break what I call Wrong and Ineffective Leadership and start to build Right and Effective Leadership, learning is essential.

 

In part 2 of Real Leadership! Are You Ready?, I specifically address the process that each leader must move through recursively in order to develop a leadership worthy of followership and to become the type of leader worthy of followers.  I named this process the Leadership Enrichment LIFE-cycle (LEL-c) and use LIFE as metaphor (i.e., to denote the journey is one of a lifetime) and to ascribe meaning (i.e., to denote the four stages of Leadership Enrichment: Life-Long Learning; Internal Locus of Control; Fulfillment; Excellence).

 

Certainly, the LEL-c begins with Life-Long Learning, which entails a challenging journey through an emotional connector (AWARENESS) and lands at a performance waypoint (LEARN). But the journey was never intended to stop a the first waypoint, rather to continue through the remaining emotional connectors (ACCEPTANCE, ACTION, ACHEIVEMENT) with brief lay-overs at the remaining performance waypoints (CHANGE, GROW, LEAD). 

 

Check it out. The Personal and Organizational Leadership Platforms that can emerge are real LIFE-changers.

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Dominant Leadership - Become A Charismatic And Fearless Leader Of Men, Women, and Nations

http://mindpersuasion.com Everybody is a born leader. Once you program yourself with the right set of beliefs to unlock your inherent skills, nothing can sto...
Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's insight:

Everyone is created with "born-in" Leadership Potential.  Not everyone converts that potential, however, through "made-in" Leadership Performance.  And while I agree there is an absolute need to select the "right set of beliefs" and that NLP can play a critical role in a leader's early development strategy, I also contend that the sum-total of those beliefs (e.g., worldview) must include beliefs about others--not just about ourselves--particularly when we're talking about the difference in becoming a Real Leader as opposed to an imposter or poser.

 

I've observed many over the years who truly believe they are leading when, in fact, no one is following.  They are absoluley convinced of something that just ins't so.

 

To break out of that mold and become a Real Leader, it does matter what you believe about yourself...that is just a starting point--a certificate of beginning.  What reallly matters is what you believe about others...the ones that your leadership impacts on a daily basis and, ultiimately, what they believe about you.  

 

This explains why every Real Leader that I know: (a) truly believes that right leadership is based on the moral law and a love for the moral law giver (e.g., the greatest commandment) and (b) truly believes that effective leadership is based on caring enough about others (e.g., the second greatest commandment) to ask them regularly about the impact their leadership is having. 

 

This is not an easy process.  In fact, it is very humbling.  But it is equally necessary and useful in the development of Real Leadership.  It is not easy because the former will require sacrifice and the latter requires the hard work of dealing with new information about your impact on others that is not very gratifying. 

 

Regardless, if you are willing to submit yourself to the moral law, sacrifice yourself for the sake of others, and take pains with making improvements on the basis of the feedback you receive, it is better than any single belief you may have about yourself when it comes to developing a Real Leadership platform that can rise to the bottom.  Only from the bottom are you able to move upward and/ or outward with Passion, Patience, and Perseverence to create value for and with others.   

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