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How Multitasking Slows Your Brain & Kills Your Productivity

How Multitasking Slows Your Brain & Kills Your Productivity | Real Estate | Scoop.it

It wasn’t long ago when people were consistently praised for multitasking– the parent who, in one night, juggles children’s homework, their own professional work, the laundry, and spinning classes. Or the ultra-connected marketing manager who, in an hour, answers 10 emails, works on a sales pitch, grabs a coffee, and books a plane ticket for a trade show. Both sound like veritable productivity masters. But the mental toll caused by multitasking has been proven to far outweigh peoples’ ability to simultaneously juggle tasks.

 

Multitasking, in fact, is multifaceted. The term can be defined as performing two or more tasks at the same time, or constantly switching from one thing to another. It can also be described as performing numerous tasks in rapid succession– like sending a tweet, then writing an email, then making a call, then checking your messages, then finishing your presentation. Sound familiar?


Via The Learning Factor
Heidi Babcock's insight:

There is no perfect balance, only balanc-ing!

 

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Andres Frank's curator insight, May 14, 2014 7:08 AM

I agree with this opinion and I believe CEOs should also notice these things while giving tasks to their employees

Emeric Nectoux's curator insight, May 14, 2014 5:02 PM

I would not be so "black or white" on this... For sure, in some specific moment, we definitely  need to focus and avoid any kind of distractions, then we should avoid multitasking. But, to be fair, these kind of moments, requiring our full attention, are not so frequent in a regular day. We are all able to identify those and isolate ourselves (if not possible within the 2 coming minutes, then schedule some time later on to do so, cf. the famous 2 minutes rule)


In the other hand, multitasking is very close to the way your brain work. It allows you to make connections, relate different things together, mix them and at the end breaking through, while focus only on 1 thing might lead you to a dead end. 


 As often, it is question and balance and knowing him/herself wheel enough to be able to adopt the quite behavior at the right time.

4twenty2's curator insight, May 15, 2014 4:51 AM

Wow .... We have all been taught multi-tasking is the way forward - Men are often derided for their lack of ability in this department and now it seems they have been better at getting the job done all along!  

 

This quote really hit hole "trying to focus on one or more tasks at a time actually reduces your productivity by a whopping 40%. It’s equivalent to missing one night of sleep and has two-times more effect on your brain than smoking marijuana"  No wonder after a day of multitasking we feel exhausted -  a rethink on time management is needed!

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Prefab Portable Property ÁPH80 In Spain By ÁBATON | Interior Design

Prefab Portable Property ÁPH80 In Spain By ÁBATON | Interior Design | Real Estate | Scoop.it
Project Transportable Residence ÁPH80 is a design and style by Madrid based ÁBATON Architects, a dwelling excellent for two individuals, simply transported b (RT @cheplu: Prefab Portable Property ÁPH80 In Spain By ÁBATON -
Heidi Babcock's insight:

Wow!

 

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Do You Really Want to Be Yourself at Work?

Do You Really Want to Be Yourself at Work? | Real Estate | Scoop.it

Would you love to work in a place where you could truly be yourself? Where you didn’t have to spend a single moment of your time and energy making sure you put only your best self forward?

 

Most people would, according to research recently published by Rob Goffee and Gareth Jones in “Creating the Best Workplace on Earth.” For three years they went around the world, asking hundreds of executives to describe the attributes of their ideal workplace. Topping the list was an environment where people could be themselves and where the company invested in developing them (and everyone they worked with) to be the very best they could be.


Via The Learning Factor
Heidi Babcock's insight:

Interesting...

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, June 24, 2014 6:21 PM

Take this assessment to see how well suited you are to fulfilling your highest potential.

Graeme Reid's curator insight, June 25, 2014 10:03 PM

It seems that there are not many organisations dedicated to developing every one of its people by weaving personal growth into day-to-day work.

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Realty Investors Flock to Spain - New York Times

Realty Investors Flock to Spain - New York Times | Real Estate | Scoop.it
New York Times Realty Investors Flock to Spain New York Times Real estate prices are down as much as 50 percent from their peak during a housing bubble, and investors from Asia to the United States and Britain are flocking to Spain to try to catch...
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How Multitasking Slows Your Brain & Kills Your Productivity

How Multitasking Slows Your Brain & Kills Your Productivity | Real Estate | Scoop.it

It wasn’t long ago when people were consistently praised for multitasking– the parent who, in one night, juggles children’s homework, their own professional work, the laundry, and spinning classes. Or the ultra-connected marketing manager who, in an hour, answers 10 emails, works on a sales pitch, grabs a coffee, and books a plane ticket for a trade show. Both sound like veritable productivity masters. But the mental toll caused by multitasking has been proven to far outweigh peoples’ ability to simultaneously juggle tasks.

 

Multitasking, in fact, is multifaceted. The term can be defined as performing two or more tasks at the same time, or constantly switching from one thing to another. It can also be described as performing numerous tasks in rapid succession– like sending a tweet, then writing an email, then making a call, then checking your messages, then finishing your presentation. Sound familiar?


Via The Learning Factor
Heidi Babcock's insight:

There is no perfect balance, only balanc-ing!

 

more...
Andres Frank's curator insight, May 14, 2014 7:08 AM

I agree with this opinion and I believe CEOs should also notice these things while giving tasks to their employees

Emeric Nectoux's curator insight, May 14, 2014 5:02 PM

I would not be so "black or white" on this... For sure, in some specific moment, we definitely  need to focus and avoid any kind of distractions, then we should avoid multitasking. But, to be fair, these kind of moments, requiring our full attention, are not so frequent in a regular day. We are all able to identify those and isolate ourselves (if not possible within the 2 coming minutes, then schedule some time later on to do so, cf. the famous 2 minutes rule)


In the other hand, multitasking is very close to the way your brain work. It allows you to make connections, relate different things together, mix them and at the end breaking through, while focus only on 1 thing might lead you to a dead end. 


 As often, it is question and balance and knowing him/herself wheel enough to be able to adopt the quite behavior at the right time.

4twenty2's curator insight, May 15, 2014 4:51 AM

Wow .... We have all been taught multi-tasking is the way forward - Men are often derided for their lack of ability in this department and now it seems they have been better at getting the job done all along!  

 

This quote really hit hole "trying to focus on one or more tasks at a time actually reduces your productivity by a whopping 40%. It’s equivalent to missing one night of sleep and has two-times more effect on your brain than smoking marijuana"  No wonder after a day of multitasking we feel exhausted -  a rethink on time management is needed!

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You Will Absolutely Love This 20-Minute, Life-Improving Daily Habit

You Will Absolutely Love This 20-Minute, Life-Improving Daily Habit | Real Estate | Scoop.it
You could spend hours reading advice on how to improve your diet or become more organized. But maybe you'd be better off using that time to take a nap in the afternoon.

Via Barb Jemmott
Heidi Babcock's insight:

Yes, It's becoming a theme with me...

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Angie Mc's curator insight, April 2, 2014 11:38 PM

Nap!

donhornsby's curator insight, April 3, 2014 7:34 AM

One of my recent life changes is a focus on getting enough sleep. In the past, I have tended to be one who would burn the candle at both ends. 

 

This is an interesting idea....

 

(Quote): Of all the advice you get about how to improve your life, does this sound like the one thing you'd be very happy to add to your daily routine?

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African elephants can distinguish human languages, genders and ages associated with danger

African elephants can distinguish human languages, genders and ages associated with danger | Real Estate | Scoop.it

Humans are among the very few animals that constitute a threat to elephants. Yet not all people are a danger — and elephants seem to know it. The giants have shown a remarkable ability to use sight and scent to distinguish between African ethnic groups that have a history of attacking them and groups that do not. Now a study reveals that they can even discern these differences from words spoken in the local tongues.


Biologists Karen McComb and Graeme Shannon at the University of Sussex in Brighton, UK, guessed that African elephants (Loxodonta africana) might be able to listen to human speech and make use of what they heard. To tease out whether this was true, they recorded the voices of men from two Kenyan ethnic groups calmly saying, “Look, look over there, a group of elephants is coming,” in their native languages. One of these groups was the semi-nomadic Maasai, some of whom periodically kill elephants during fierce competition for water or cattle-grazing space. The other was the Kamba, a crop-farming group that rarely has violent encounters with elephants.

 

The researchers played the recordings to 47 elephant family groups at Amboseli National Park in Kenya and monitored the animals' behaviour. The differences were remarkable. When the elephants heard the Maasai, they were much more likely to cautiously smell the air or huddle together than when they heard the Kamba. Indeed, the animals bunched together nearly twice as tightly when they heard the Maasai.


“We knew elephants could distinguish the Maasai and Kamba by their clothes and smells, but that they can also do so by their voices alone is really interesting,” says Fritz Vollrath, a zoologist at the University of Oxford, UK.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Eli Levine's curator insight, March 12, 2014 3:15 PM

Doesn't surprise me.  But this is proof that there is a singular kind of consciousness out there that is simply expressed in and through the many different brain types that are present on this world and, potentially, on others.

 

Enjoy the article!

 

Think about it.

Rescooped by Heidi Babcock from Interior Design & Decoration
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Happy Interior Blog: Ferm Living: Spring/Summer 2014 Collection

Happy Interior Blog: Ferm Living: Spring/Summer 2014 Collection | Real Estate | Scoop.it

Today on the blog: The new spring/summer 2014 collection of Ferm Living


Via Igor Josif
Heidi Babcock's insight:

Take a look at these nice decor trends for 2014

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Solar power with a view: Transparent luminescent solar concentrators

Solar power with a view: Transparent luminescent solar concentrators | Real Estate | Scoop.it
Researchers have developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a flat, clear surface.

 

Research in the production of energy from solar cells placed around luminescent plastic-like materials is not new. These past efforts, however, have yielded poor results -- the energy production was inefficient and the materials were highly colored.

 

"No one wants to sit behind colored glass," said Lunt, an assistant professor of chemical engineering and materials science. "It makes for a very colorful environment, like working in a disco. We take an approach where we actually make the luminescent active layer itself transparent."

 

The solar harvesting system uses small organic molecules developed by Lunt and his team to absorb specific nonvisible wavelengths of sunlight. "We can tune these materials to pick up just the ultraviolet and the near infrared wavelengths that then 'glow' at another wavelength in the infrared," he said.


The "glowing" infrared light is guided to the edge of the plastic where it is converted to electricity by thin strips of photovoltaic solar cells. "Because the materials do not absorb or emit light in the visible spectrum, they look exceptionally transparent to the human eye," Lunt said.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Art House by Sarah Davison Interior Design | Home Adore

Art House by Sarah Davison Interior Design | Home Adore | Real Estate | Scoop.it
Art House by Sarah Davison Interior Design http://t.co/DbiyT2wqT7
Please RT #architecture #interiordesign http://t.co/49NoB7iAOy
Heidi Babcock's insight:

Nice shack!

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Why Taking A Vacation Can Make You Better At Your Job

Why Taking A Vacation Can Make You Better At Your Job | Real Estate | Scoop.it

A 2014 Oxford Economics Assessment of Paid Time Off in the U.S. showed 42% of employees with paid time off finished the year with unused days, leaving an average of 8.1 days unused.

Small business owners are especially bad at taking time away. According to the 2013 Sage Reinvention of Small Business Study, 43% of small business owners are taking less vacation time than five years ago.

 

The fact that we don't use all of our vacation time isn’t all that surprising. After all, getting away for a few days or weeks can be overwhelming when it feels like stepping away from the office will create a painful backlog of work when you return.

 

But what if stepping away from the daily grind made you better at your job?


Via The Learning Factor
Heidi Babcock's insight:

That's what I'm talking about!

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 22, 2014 6:37 PM

We say we want more time off, but most of us don't use all of our vacation time. Life won't fall apart if you take two weeks off in fact your work might actually improve.

Michael J Rutherford's curator insight, May 23, 2014 9:26 AM

Today's virtual world that works makes it possible for anyone who wants to travel abroad making it a lifestyle...

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, May 23, 2014 10:32 PM

This is a good one! Nothing like a vacation, a week away from work, with your family or your co-workers. What matters is the change, change of atmosphere, the adventure activities, the star-studded sky above you, and the fresh air you breathe, enough to recharge your batteries, and yes inspire you with new ideas and thoughts!

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Are You Too Tentative? Four Ways To Take Smarter Risks, Not Just Safe Ones

Are You Too Tentative? Four Ways To Take Smarter Risks, Not Just Safe Ones | Real Estate | Scoop.it
When weighing a risk, potential losses tend to loom larger than potential gains. That is, we tend to focus more on what might go wrong ? what we might lose or sacrifice ? than what might go right.

Via Barb Jemmott
Heidi Babcock's insight:

So true!

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Rescooped by Heidi Babcock from Megatrends
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162 Future Jobs: Preparing for Jobs that Don’t Yet Exist

162 Future Jobs: Preparing for Jobs that Don’t Yet Exist | Real Estate | Scoop.it

A recent article in The Economist quotes Bill Gates as saying at least a dozen job types will be taken over by robots and automation in the next two decades, and these jobs cover both high-paying and low-skilled workers. Some of the positions he mentioned were commercial pilots, legal work, technical writing, telemarketers, accountants, retail workers, and real estate sales agents.

 

Indeed, as I’ve predicted before, by 2030 over 2 billion jobs will disappear. Again, this is not a doom and gloom prediction, rather a wakeup call for the world.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Heidi Babcock's insight:

Check out some of the jobs the next generation will be doing!

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Takudzwa Kunaka's curator insight, April 2, 2014 7:42 AM
that is the decade of digital age
Cas Op de Beek's curator insight, April 11, 2014 5:50 AM

First there came the computer and brought us more jobs and now comes more jobs and more. Technology brings us a lot more than only freedom he brings us more jobs as well. One small step for men but a big step for the future. 

Jim Doyle's curator insight, May 9, 2014 9:55 PM

162 Future Jobs: Preparing for Jobs that Don’t Yet Exist

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Steve Perlman's Amazing Wireless Machine Is Finally Here

Steve Perlman's Amazing Wireless Machine Is Finally Here | Real Estate | Scoop.it

Entrepreneur Steve Perlman unveils a new version of his wireless technology, which could give each mobile device its own super-fast connection.

 

Steve Perlman is ready to give you a personal cell phone signal that follows you from place to place, a signal that’s about 1,000 times faster than what you have today because you needn’t share it with anyone else.

Perlman — the iconic Silicon Valley inventor best known for selling his web TV company to Microsoft for half a billion dollars — started work on this new-age cellular technology a decade ago, and on Wednesday morning, he’ll give the first public demonstration at Columbia University in New York, his alma mater.Previously known as DIDO, the technology is now called pCell — short for “personal cell” — and judging from the demo Perlman gave us at his lab in San Francisco last week, it works as advertised, streaming video and other data to phones with a speed and a smoothness you’re unlikely to achieve over current cell networks.

 

“It’s a complete rewrite of the wireless rulebook,” says Perlman, who also helped Apple create QuickTime, the technology that brought video to the Macintosh. “Since the invention of wireless, people have moved around the coverage area. Now, the coverage area follows you.”

 

“That will shock people,” Perlman said in an interview. “It means we have hundreds of millions of devices out there that are ready to go.”

 

Under Perlman’s pCell system, interference from the cells is not an issue. Instead of blasting out a dumb signal across a given area, Perlman and his team of researchers have developed a smart transmission system. Their networking equipment locates a device like a smartphone and uses complex mathematical operations to create a unique signal—hence the personal cell idea—just for that device. The upshot of this is that you can place the pCell transmitters anywhere and not worry about their signals bleeding into each other. And instead of sharing a signal, each person gets to tap into close to the full capacity of the transmitter. “We believe this is the largest increase in capacity in the history of wireless technology,” says Perlman. “It’s like the wireless equivalent of fiber-optic cables.”


Artemis Networks is the company Perlman has formed to sell this technology. It’s in the process of putting pCell transmitters on about 350 rooftops in San Francisco, and Perlman is looking to work with a telco or technology company like Google(GOOG) or Microsoft (MSFT) to get a commercial service running in the fourth quarter. “We’ll do San Francisco first and then do New York, Chicago, Dallas, and other congested cities,” says Perlman.

 

To work properly, a company backing the pCell technology would need to build out a large data center in addition to deploying the transmitters. It’s in the data center where servers constantly crunch away on the algorithms that form the unique wireless stream aimed at each device. As people move about, the servers must keep recalculating and processing a new stream. Perlman expects that a single data center could satisfy the needs of a city like San Francisco.

 

Perlman has spent about 10 years working on this technology with a handful of employees. I paid a recent visit to their San Francisco laboratory and saw the technology working firsthand. Perlman had put a few of the transmitters up near the ceiling and was able to direct a wireless beam right at a device in my hand. Despite such demonstrations, Perlman has been unable to tempt venture capitalists with the technology. “They invariably bring in experts who say it doesn’t really work,” he says. “I am showing them a demo, but they remain convinced that it’s something else.”

Perlman, who made millions selling WebTV to Microsoft, has funded all of this himself, and he declines to reveal the exact amount spent so far. He will show off the pCell technology at Columbia University on Wednesday during a midday lecture.



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Casper Pieters's comment, February 21, 2014 4:39 PM
by the time we have the NBN we don't need it anymore... or way before