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Plotagon - Movie-making for everyone

Plotagon - Movie-making for everyone | Close Reading | Scoop.it

Plotagon is a tool that lets anyone create an animated movie directly from a written screenplay. Write your story, choose actors, environments and music. Press play and your movie is done. It's that simple.

Plotagon is completely free! It is in a beta stage, but you can start using it right now. No ads, no crap.

>Plotagon application for Mac or PC (system requirements).

>Comes with 5 characters and 6 environments.

>Export your movies and share them with the world.

>Expand with characters and environments from the built-in store.


Via Baiba Svenca
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Alison Rostetter's curator insight, December 30, 2013 1:18 PM

It needs downloading - obviously - and I'm not sure I want all this on my computer yet.  I'll have to wait until I have a ground-breaking idea for my next online, budget Hollywood movie.

Ranjan Munshi's curator insight, January 5, 2014 1:50 AM

The story of Fishing Village

Patrizia Tirel's curator insight, January 30, 2014 7:07 AM

not tested yet....

Rescooped by amy hrin from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
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17 Fun Tools To Teach Kids To Code by @ChrisBetcher

17 Fun Tools To Teach Kids To Code by @ChrisBetcher | Close Reading | Scoop.it

"There are many benefits to teaching young people to code.   As a musician starts learning a piece of music,  the process can be daunting.   Musicians, however, naturally start breaking the song into parts.   By slowly mastering small phrases, scales, chords, and patterns, the song slowly emerges from the student.   The discipline of decomposition and persistence shows up in computer programming too."


Via Cindy Rudy, John Evans
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Cindy Rudy's curator insight, December 4, 2013 7:42 AM
via @TDOttawa
johanna krijnsen's curator insight, December 4, 2013 2:28 PM

teach kids to code

Rescooped by amy hrin from Common Core State Standards SMUSD
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Lexile Level Is NOT Text Complexity CCSS.R.10

Lexile Level Is NOT Text Complexity CCSS.R.10 | Close Reading | Scoop.it
This Tweet yesterday from #tcrwp (Teachers College Reading and Writing Project) caught my eye.  A quick glance at the twitter stream confirmed that it came from Stephanie Harvey's keynote (sigh of ...

Via Darren Burris, Mary Reilley Clark
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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, August 21, 2013 11:08 PM

My comment to Fran's blog: Thank you, Fran! A good primer on Lexiles to teachers in search of a text! I spoke at a Common Core Conference in June and while there, sat in on a informal presentation by Malbert Smith, developer of the Lexile Framework and MetaMetrics President. He shared with us that one of the most distinguishing aspects of the algorithm determining Lexile ratings was the appearance of rare words in a text. So while many think it is about word and sentence length, it is really about the frequency of a word in a corpus of 6 million words used by the analyzer. Semantic difficulty paired with syntactic complexity determines Lexile levels. The reason novels are relatively low in the Lexile ratings is because they contain dialogue which is usually comprised of conversational language and not rare words. In a bit of fun, he shared some very short words with us and showed how quickly their inclusion can change a Lexile rating. Good stuff to know.

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How to Get Students Blogging in Math Class | Efficient & Effective

How to Get Students Blogging in Math Class | Efficient & Effective | Close Reading | Scoop.it
Learn how to get students blogging in math class by setting up and creating blog posts that display student work and allow communication of understanding.
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Media Literacy and Close Reading | Susan Ruckdschel's Blog for ...

Media Literacy and Close Reading | Susan Ruckdschel's Blog for ... | Close Reading | Scoop.it
Words about education, students, and teacher professional development (by Literacy Solutions PD)
amy hrin's insight:

Lots of examples across grades and curriculums.

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Rescooped by amy hrin from Tools for Teachers & Learners
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Build HTML5, iPhone and Android apps online for schools and education

Build HTML5, iPhone and Android apps online for schools and education | Close Reading | Scoop.it

AppShed Academy delivers key organisational tools that enable teachers to turn app development into a compelling teaching methodology. Anchor students’ creativity into the heart of your lessons and manage and channel their aspirations with confidence.


Via Nik Peachey
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Ryer Banta's curator insight, November 23, 2013 10:16 PM

Looks like this company has delivered on the great idea of making the creation of apps accessible to all. They have an education focus. I look forward to sitting down and doing some serious testing with this.  Great implications for project based teaching and engagement. In library, learning commons and across campus.

Al Post's curator insight, November 25, 2013 9:21 PM

Looks interesting. I wonder how it compares to AppInventor from MIT. http://www.appinventor.org/ ;

ElizabethHS's curator insight, December 5, 2013 9:36 AM

From Nik Peachey's "Commercial Software and Apps for Learning" -- but this one is free for students and teachers.

I'm interested in how many apps there now are to help students program their own content into games. Another step toward gamification. Also, most of these apps are cross-platform, iWorld and Android.

Rescooped by amy hrin from Close Reading
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Lexile Level Is NOT Text Complexity CCSS.R.10

Lexile Level Is NOT Text Complexity CCSS.R.10 | Close Reading | Scoop.it
This Tweet yesterday from #tcrwp (Teachers College Reading and Writing Project) caught my eye.  A quick glance at the twitter stream confirmed that it came from Stephanie Harvey's keynote (sigh of ...

Via Darren Burris, Mary Reilley Clark, amy hrin
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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, August 21, 2013 11:08 PM

My comment to Fran's blog: Thank you, Fran! A good primer on Lexiles to teachers in search of a text! I spoke at a Common Core Conference in June and while there, sat in on a informal presentation by Malbert Smith, developer of the Lexile Framework and MetaMetrics President. He shared with us that one of the most distinguishing aspects of the algorithm determining Lexile ratings was the appearance of rare words in a text. So while many think it is about word and sentence length, it is really about the frequency of a word in a corpus of 6 million words used by the analyzer. Semantic difficulty paired with syntactic complexity determines Lexile levels. The reason novels are relatively low in the Lexile ratings is because they contain dialogue which is usually comprised of conversational language and not rare words. In a bit of fun, he shared some very short words with us and showed how quickly their inclusion can change a Lexile rating. Good stuff to know.

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Six Scaffolding Strategies to Use with Your Students

Six Scaffolding Strategies to Use with Your Students | Close Reading | Scoop.it
What’s the opposite of scaffolding a lesson?
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Sunday Cummins: example of close reading.

Sunday Cummins: example of close reading. | Close Reading | Scoop.it
amy hrin's insight:

Great slideshare on annotation.

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6 Emerging Technologies in Education | LearnDash

6 Emerging Technologies in Education | LearnDash | Close Reading | Scoop.it
6 emerging technologies in education (all already here) http://t.co/wzcPCQBLNS
amy hrin's insight:

Lets get started with tech.

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