Reading and Common Core
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Reading and Common Core
Articles and professional journals dealing with the ten reading anchor standards of common core, secondary focus.
Curated by Jenna Cramer
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7 Critical Reading Strategies

7 Critical Reading Strategies | Reading and Common Core | Scoop.it
Seven things you can do tomorrow in your classroom to help your students become better readers. While the list is almost endless, these seven critical strategies are an easy place to start.
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For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico

For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico | Reading and Common Core | Scoop.it
With Europe sputtering and China costly, the “stars are aligning” for Mexico as broad changes in the global economy create new dynamics of migration.
Jenna Cramer's insight:

Writing Topics:

1. Do you think “Mexico’s moment” will last? Do you believe Mexico will continue to attract more and more migrants? WHY?


2. HOW does this article challenge some commonly held perceptions about Mexican immigration patterns among Americans?

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Teaching Students to Analyze Complex Nonverbal Texts

Teaching Students to Analyze Complex Nonverbal Texts | Reading and Common Core | Scoop.it
Standard 9 of the Common Core State Standards underscores the importance of students reading and writing about complex literary and informational texts, skills critical for "college and career readin (Teaching Students to Analyze Complex Nonverbal...

Via Darren Burris, Patricia Sarles
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Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, April 6, 2013 9:54 AM

The points provided here are not new, but they offer new tie-ins to the common core and give great examples. Some people have been teaching this way for quite a while.

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Complex Texts and a Non-Freaked Out Approach to the Common Core | Teaching the Core

Complex Texts and a Non-Freaked Out Approach to the Common Core | Teaching the Core | Reading and Common Core | Scoop.it
How do we incorporate the Common Core's complex texts in a way that students will read, engage with, debate, and discuss? Join us as we explore non-freaked implementation. (RT @davestuartjr: What's your approach to whole-class complex texts?

Via Darren Burris, Patricia Sarles
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Text Complexity: Balancing Readability and Reading Fluency

Text Complexity: Balancing Readability and Reading Fluency | Reading and Common Core | Scoop.it

On Common Core | School Library Journal

 

Knowing the research behind text complexity is critical to understanding the call for more complexity.

The CCSS crafters examined college freshman textbooks and career manuals.These texts typically measure at a Lexile score of 1450.This Lexile measure was used as a benchmark for college and career readiness (CCR).Grade level Lexiles were then scaffolded in reverse, defining grade level Lexile expectations as stated in the Common Core Appendix A.


Via Mel Riddile, Patricia Sarles
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Linda Dougherty's curator insight, March 23, 2013 12:46 AM

Important reading for school librarians working to assist teachers in finding informational text that is differentiated in reading levels.

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Common Core: What Is A "Complex Text" Anyway?

Common Core: What Is A "Complex Text" Anyway? | Reading and Common Core | Scoop.it
Last month I attended a training focused on teaching "complex texts" to address the Common Core Standards.

Via Mary Reilley Clark, Patricia Sarles
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Mary Reilley Clark's curator insight, April 2, 2013 9:07 PM

Clear and concise introduction to complex text. 

Elizabeth Sky-McIlvain's comment, April 3, 2013 10:25 AM
It would also be good to compare to texts, say The Hunger Games and The Lord of the Flies, in order to grapple with text complexity - which text is more complex? Which text merits a true close reading (of passages)? I am guessing that teachers will be somewhat divided on this, by grade level and perhaps also by years of experience. By comparing (as the CCSS also recognizes) we often gain a deeper understanding. In isolation, any text can become complex simply because it can be questioned to death.