Reading & Writing for ELLs
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RAFT

RAFT | Reading & Writing for ELLs | Scoop.it

What is a RAFT writing strategy?  What are a few examples?  

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Jennifer Roberson's comment, April 10, 2013 7:46 PM
I remember learning about this strategy when I was taking Reading grad classes and loved this idea! I love this strategy because it gives students a way to process information and share it in a creative way while also teaching students about different correlations between the role and the intended audience.
Tracywellingtonhammond's comment, April 13, 2013 12:10 PM
The R.A.F.T. theory and acronym is brilliant and I feel this approach to writing can be satisfying to English Language Learners.Raft sounds like a good way to enhance Ells understanding of a given topic.Anytime students are allowed to brainstorm, make decisions and encouraged to be as creative, unpredictable and mysterious as they choose during the writing process can foster a sense of ownership and creativity. I particularly always consider a student's learning style so I welcome strategies that address various learning modalities.
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Classroom Strategies | Resources for educators of kids in grades 4-12 | AdLit.org

Classroom Strategies | Resources for educators of kids in grades 4-12 | AdLit.org | Reading & Writing for ELLs | Scoop.it
Explicit strategy instruction is at the core of good comprehension instruction. Teachers should help students to understand why a strategy is useful, how it is used, and when it is appropriate.
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Tracywellingtonhammond's comment, April 13, 2013 10:05 AM
Please disregard the gibberish comment, It was a test.. I finally figured this thing out.I definitely co-sign everything the article has shared in this reading.This whole explicit instruction is the key to many learners finding ther way, including myself. I believe these strategies will go a long way with all ESOL levels. I will find it useful working with high school level1-3 students especilaa that many
Tracywellingtonhammond's comment, April 13, 2013 10:05 AM
Please disregard the gibberish comment, It was a test.. I finally figured this thing out.I definitely co-sign everything the article has shared in this reading.This whole explicit instruction is the key to many learners finding ther way, including myself. I believe these strategies will go a long way with all ESOL levels. I will find it useful working with high school level1-3 students especilaa that many
Tracywellingtonhammond's comment, April 13, 2013 10:10 AM
I was not finished. I am cracking myself up as I am in developing my tech skills. Level 4 and 5s can greatly benefit as well because these students are becoming more specific and deliberate in inderstanding concepts, so when strategies are explicitly taught, connections are bound to happen at this level.
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Reading and Writing Instruction for ELLs | Colorín Colorado

The good news about teaching reading to English language learners (ELLs) is that you don't have to learn an entirely new method. You can and should use what you already know to be effective, research-based reading instruction.
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Lauren Ashlee Tierney's comment, April 10, 2013 8:28 PM
Patti, I found this one interesting too. In reference to what you said about learning the alphabet, I have found that with one student this year, he has learned many letter sounds, can tell me things that start with the letter, but he is unable to name the letter. When shown the letter "f" he says "fish" and makes the /f/ sound.
Melissa Galliano Armand's comment, April 12, 2013 10:36 AM
Lauren, I have a couple of students that name the picture instead of the letter. I liked what was said in this article as it reinforces many of the things we are already doing in kindergarten.
Tracywellingtonhammond's comment, April 13, 2013 10:59 AM
Colorin Colorado is my new BFF website. I discovered this website working on a previous assignment. This site is filled with useful information, strategies and resources for all ESOL levels, educators and parents. I found the website particularly helpful because it provides me specific insight on Special Education and Ells.Suggested language goals to be incorporated into IEPs for ELLS with diagnosed disabilities are available. The site appears to specifically tailor to the needs of levels- 1 through level 3s at the elemenetary level yet many strategies can be adapted for middle school to high school learners. The free toolkits are great for centers and independent practice,
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Write Alouds - ReadWriteThink

Write Alouds - ReadWriteThink | Reading & Writing for ELLs | Scoop.it
This strategy guide explains how to use write-aloud (also known as modeled writing) to teach effective writing strategies and improve students’ independent writing ability.
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Lauren Ashlee Tierney's comment, April 10, 2013 8:32 PM
This is so beneficial! I use this in Kindergarten while reading a lot and sometimes in writing... I realize I should use it even more. Students really seem to take a lot away from think alouds.
Shanel Norwood's comment, April 12, 2013 7:31 PM
I love write aloud! I use this strategy a lot. My favorite part is when I make a "mistake" and the kids correct me. They love it. But I also stress to them the importance of editing. I tell them if I make mistakes when I'm writing, they probably do too so it's important that they go back and make sure they're not missing words and check for spelling.
Meredith L'Amoreaux's comment, April 15, 2013 1:31 PM
I really think this "write aloud" concept would be helpful for my students. I do a lot of outloud thinking with them, when I am demonstrating how to make connections to different eras in history and I think this would improve the students writing in the classroom. I would also be able to instruct students how I would want short essay questions answered and what the format should look like.
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Literacy Report | Alliance for Excellent Education

Literacy Report | Alliance for Excellent Education | Reading & Writing for ELLs | Scoop.it

Double the Work: Challenges and Solutions to Acquiring Language and Academic Literacy for Adolescent English Language Learners

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Meredith L'Amoreaux's comment, April 15, 2013 1:44 PM
I understand how hard it is for ELLs in the secondary setting. Many are doing double duty of not only learning English but also trying to comprehend what the core content material is. Some of the statistics are alarming when seeing that only 30% of children grades 6-12 are at the appropriate reading level. It is important to motivate ELLs to practice their reading and writing by giving them materials to which they find interesting.Also, as the article mentions, teachers need to be more aware of what level and who is ELL in their classroom. They do not make it easily available, only now that the DOJ is visiting do they place it on PowerSchool.
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50 Popular iPad Apps For Struggling Readers & Writers - TeachThought

50 Popular iPad Apps For Struggling Readers & Writers - TeachThought | Reading & Writing for ELLs | Scoop.it
Whether you're the parent of a child with a reading disability or an educator that works with learning disabled students on a daily basis, you're…...
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Brett Machovec's comment, April 12, 2013 4:46 PM
Neat. Good resource. Most of us don't have the time to search for these types of good resources, having them in one place allows us to quickly find apps that are useful to our classroom. Many apps contain the four component of literacy so it would be great for ell's.
Shanel Norwood's comment, April 12, 2013 7:33 PM
This is a great resource. I have an ipad, but I never use it for school because I don't know what's out there. I would also like to share this with parents. Most of them have some type of tablet and they are always looking for ways to help their children at home. With these apps the parents do not have to completely understand what we are learning in class to help their child.
Meredith L'Amoreaux's comment, April 15, 2013 1:34 PM
Although I teach in the high school setting, many of my students are on a 3-5 grade reading level. They struggle with vocabulary and terminology because of the difficulty of the language. I would use some of these apps in the classroom, recommend them to my peers who teach English to these same students. This would also be a great resource to share with parents
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RAFT

RAFT | Reading & Writing for ELLs | Scoop.it

What is a RAFT writing strategy?  What are a few examples?  

more...
Jennifer Roberson's comment, April 10, 2013 7:46 PM
I remember learning about this strategy when I was taking Reading grad classes and loved this idea! I love this strategy because it gives students a way to process information and share it in a creative way while also teaching students about different correlations between the role and the intended audience.
Tracywellingtonhammond's comment, April 13, 2013 12:10 PM
The R.A.F.T. theory and acronym is brilliant and I feel this approach to writing can be satisfying to English Language Learners.Raft sounds like a good way to enhance Ells understanding of a given topic.Anytime students are allowed to brainstorm, make decisions and encouraged to be as creative, unpredictable and mysterious as they choose during the writing process can foster a sense of ownership and creativity. I particularly always consider a student's learning style so I welcome strategies that address various learning modalities.
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The Writing Process

The Writing Process | Reading & Writing for ELLs | Scoop.it
Whether you know it or not, there’s a process to writing – which many writers follow naturally.
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Shanel Norwood's comment, April 12, 2013 7:26 PM
I always say my dream job would be an elementary writing teacher. Even though it is a necessity, explicit writing instruction often times gets overlooked in the primary grades. The writing process is so vital. We expect students to write in most subjects areas, but we never teach them how. For example, a student is asked to write an essay for social studies, but he does not know the writing process. Therefore he turns in a paper that is missing information, not organized, and has multiple errors. If the student knew the writing process they would have brainstormed to get their thoughts together. Though the essay may not have time for a rough draft and a final copy, the student would know that they need to review their paper before during it in. However, many students aren't taught this so they do not know. Also, there are so many reading strategies that go with the writing process. Most pre-writes helps an author set a main idea and details. When students have to write a paper with a main idea and details, it is easier for them to recognize it in other pieces of work. Revising is the same as monitoring. Does this make sense? Let me reread to make sure. Is my punctuation correct? If a student can understand punctuation they can comprehend more efficiently.
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Improve ESL Reading Comprehension with Journal Writing

Improve ESL Reading Comprehension with Journal Writing | Reading & Writing for ELLs | Scoop.it
Repetition is key to language learning as well as ESL reading comprehension; repeated reading of texts along with use of a reading journal increases a student's opportunities to succeed.
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Julie Albert Crossley's comment, April 11, 2013 9:11 PM
I really like the idea of using a Reading Journal. I work with first graders and I like the idea of having children read silently, writing the words they know, the words they recognize but don't understand their meaning, and then writing what the story is about. Then the teacher can respond to the problem words and assist them in seeing the words and how they may be connected to other words. Having children make flash cards and write the words they are struggling with is something I do all the time. The journal I think would be helpful in that is tracks different aspects of children's individual reading skills and helps children practice their writing skills as well. I can't wait to give it a try with leveled texts to see how it can work with first graders.
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Improving Adolescent Literacy: Effective Classroom and Intervention Practices: What Works Clearinghouse

Improving Adolescent Literacy: Effective Classroom and Intervention Practices: What Works Clearinghouse | Reading & Writing for ELLs | Scoop.it
This guide presents strategies that classroom teachers and specialists can use to increase the reading ability of adolescent students.
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ReadWorks.org

ReadWorks.org | Reading & Writing for ELLs | Scoop.it
Free, research-based K-6 reading comprehension lesson plans and non-fiction reading passages & question sets. Common Core aligned, teacher & principal endorsed.
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Alice Blackstone's comment, April 8, 2013 6:24 PM
Alice B.I looked at some of the lesson plans. I saw some good activities that I may use even if I don't execute the entire lesson plan. I liked the idea of flagging literature with post-its with the author's purpose and an explicit explanation of the choice.
Melissa Galliano Armand's comment, April 12, 2013 10:57 AM
This website is potentially useful. I liked how easy it was to search the website.
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Developing Fluency With ESL Students

Developing Fluency With ESL Students | Reading & Writing for ELLs | Scoop.it
Structured language practice strategies in the classroom ensure that second language learners have enough oral practice to begin using the language they've been taught.
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Peter Wolf's comment, April 6, 2013 10:31 PM
I was familiar with (and have practiced) Echo Talk and Choral Response in the classrooms where I work, but am now interested in Talking Stick and Lines of Communication. Similar to the way in which Talking Stick seems to play out, the social studies general educator who I work with uses a karaoke machine to have students do 'share outs' when thoughts/ideas come to them relating to the topic(s) being discussed. Overall this strategy seems to be both amusing and beneficial to most of our students (ESL, GenEd, and SPED).
Julie Albert Crossley's comment, April 11, 2013 8:35 PM
I really like the new spins on speaking tasks for helping children become more fluent speakers. I like the choral response that requires students to stop and think and put a thumbs up when they are ready to answer. My students often blurt out the answers before my ELL studens havea chance to process the question. This will help students get a chance to speak. Also I love the talking stick idea that gives children the chance to speak or repeat what their classmates say. Either way these strategies can really help my students listen and practice English sentence structure to help them become more fluent English speakers
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10 Reasons Why I Want My Students to Blog - Getting Smart by Susan Lucille Davis - DigLN, edchat, EdTech

10 Reasons Why I Want My Students to Blog - Getting Smart by Susan Lucille Davis - DigLN, edchat, EdTech | Reading & Writing for ELLs | Scoop.it
First of all, blogging is writing, 21st century style, plain and simple. Blogging is a massive genre. It comes in many forms, addresses myriad topics, and can certainly range in quality.
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Tracywellingtonhammond's comment, April 13, 2013 11:32 AM
Blogging is definitely "writing 21st century style, plain and simple "whether I am on board or not, But, taking into account the generation of students that I am working with, I can see this multimedia format of blogging working for students. All students want to be successful and climb out of a dark place that they may be in- studnts realized it's a world better developed out here and the Ell can live in it- by blogging. Students have big ambitions so it's refreshing to read about a way that students can start practicing their writing in the real. Blogging is an interesting way to express ideas, give a voice to their passion, share personal perspectives, practice honesty and reveal true character. I know Ells can do this! I would like to know more about how to get writing in this venure started.
Shannon Morgan's comment, April 14, 2013 7:59 PM
I agree that blogging would be a great way to practice writing in class. It would be an engaging activity, in which the students will enjoy. However, I do have a few concerns. First would be access to technology for students to be able to blog. Most computer labs are taken up during the day, and I couldn't assign it for homework because not all of my students have computers. I would also be worried that the students would be using the blogs appropriately. Overall, I think this would be a great teaching tool and I wish I could use it.
Jeff Van Wassen's comment, April 16, 2013 3:52 PM
I think blogging is a great strategy to get students to write about topics that they enjoy. Sometimes I have my students write on blogs that discuss articles that they have read in class. This is a great way for my students to practice their German and have back and forth conversations with with other students learning German but also native speakers. This idea works great with ELL students, but I believe can have a few draw-backs depending on the forum in which you are blogging. Unless the student is blogging in a forum that is filled with other academic students or individuals who are educated, repsonses could become filled with more social language, rather than academic language. I think it is the job of the teacher to ensure that the blog sites are appropriate and that postings are written at a high level.