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Take Your Writing From Meh To Memorable With These 12 Simple Techniques

Take Your Writing From Meh To Memorable With These 12 Simple Techniques | Reading & Writing | Scoop.it

We weren’t all born to love verbs and spend hours toiling lovingly over word order and yet as small business owners and marketers, one of the most important hats that we necessarily wear is “writer”.

 

If you don’t consider yourself a writer, aren’t entirely comfortable with the writing process and can’t outsource to a professional, that doesn’t mean you’re dead in the water. Nor does it mean you should shrug and put out subpar content because, “Hey, I’m not a writer. That’s as good as it gets.”

 

Try one or more of these techniques the next time you put pencil to paper – or fingers to keyboard – for writing that has a whole lot more marketing punch....


Via Jeff Domansky
Kelsey Green's insight:

Really helpful with good templates to follow.

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Matt Rees's curator insight, February 18, 10:15 PM

"Meh" does seem to be the new word on the web. It's not exactly good writing, but let's not hold that against them....

Jenny McComb's curator insight, March 5, 6:37 AM

Good article! Lots of useful hints to help add spark and clarity to one's writing. I found the tips on he/she/it/them especially insightful. A good example of personable writing on a specific topic as well.

Valerie Robins's curator insight, June 11, 10:14 AM

If you don’t consider yourself a writer, aren’t entirely comfortable with the writing process and can’t outsource to a professional, that doesn’t mean you’re dead in the water. Nor does it mean you should shrug and put out subpar content because, “Hey, I’m not a writer. That’s as good as it gets.”


Try one or more of these techniques the next time you put pencil to paper – or fingers to keyboard – for writing that has a whole lot more marketing punch....

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Rescooped by Kelsey Green from Metaglossia: The Translation World
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Northwestern study: Musicianship may boost reading, language abilities

Northwestern study: Musicianship may boost reading, language abilities | Reading & Writing | Scoop.it

Playing a musical instrument can have extraordinary cognitive and motor benefits, possibly opening the door to improved reading and language ability, according to a recent Northwestern University...


Via Charles Tiayon
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Rescooped by Kelsey Green from Metaglossia: The Translation World
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Study: Reading Will Improve Your Social Skills

Study: Reading Will Improve Your Social Skills | Reading & Writing | Scoop.it
At least, reading literary fiction will.

Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:55 AM
10/4/13 at 4:15 PMStudy: Reading Will Improve Your Social SkillsBY ERICA SCHWIEGERSHAUSEN       

Books are a handy tool for avoiding other people, as anyone who's ever had a chatty seatmate on a cross-country flight well knows. But it turns out books can also improve your social skills — not merely your ability to avoid using them. According to the New YorkTimes, a study published in the journal Science has revealed that after reading excerpts from literary fiction (like Anton Chekhov and Lydia Davis), subjects performed better on tests measuring empathy, social perception, and emotional intelligence.

Interestingly, the effects don’t extend to popular fiction or serious nonfiction. Participants who were given nonfiction selections to read — like “How the Potato Changed the World,” a decidedly non-literary work from Smithsonian Magazine — did not perform as well on the tests as those who read the literary excerpts. Those who were given best sellers, like Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl, did no better on the tests than those who read nothing immediately prior. Researchers believe that literary-fiction readers fared best because novels often depict emotional subtleties and nuances, prompting readers to make inferences about the characters.

  
Rescooped by Kelsey Green from Empathy and Compassion
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Does reading literature increase empathy?

Does reading literature increase empathy? | Reading & Writing | Scoop.it

Here's a report on a series of studies that purport to show that reading a few minutes of "literary fiction" improves scores on a test of emotional empathy ("Reading the Mind in the Eyes"), compared to reading non-fiction. Reading popular fiction did nothing to improve scores over those of non-reading controls.

New York Times

People ranging in age from 18 to 75 were recruited for each of five experiments. They were paid $2 or $3 each to read for a few minutes. Some were given excerpts from award-winning literary fiction (Don DeLillo, Wendell Berry). Others were given best sellers like Gillian Flynn’s “Gone Girl,” a Rosamunde Pilcher romance or a Robert Heinlein science fiction tale.

 

...As I have suggested before, I would rather engage in psychotherapy with a therapist who reads Dostoevsky and Melville than with one who reads books about the brain. It would be lovely if a case could be built that shows that the reading of literature can make you a better (e.g., more empathetic) person.

 

by Glenn Sullivan 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Brenda J. Alegria's curator insight, December 9, 2013 3:15 PM

I found this article intresting in how studies were conducted to see if reading fiction increases empathy skills. 

Rescooped by Kelsey Green from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
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Take Your Writing From Meh To Memorable With These 12 Simple Techniques

Take Your Writing From Meh To Memorable With These 12 Simple Techniques | Reading & Writing | Scoop.it

We weren’t all born to love verbs and spend hours toiling lovingly over word order and yet as small business owners and marketers, one of the most important hats that we necessarily wear is “writer”.

 

If you don’t consider yourself a writer, aren’t entirely comfortable with the writing process and can’t outsource to a professional, that doesn’t mean you’re dead in the water. Nor does it mean you should shrug and put out subpar content because, “Hey, I’m not a writer. That’s as good as it gets.”

 

Try one or more of these techniques the next time you put pencil to paper – or fingers to keyboard – for writing that has a whole lot more marketing punch....


Via Jeff Domansky
Kelsey Green's insight:

Really helpful with good templates to follow.

more...
Matt Rees's curator insight, February 18, 10:15 PM

"Meh" does seem to be the new word on the web. It's not exactly good writing, but let's not hold that against them....

Jenny McComb's curator insight, March 5, 6:37 AM

Good article! Lots of useful hints to help add spark and clarity to one's writing. I found the tips on he/she/it/them especially insightful. A good example of personable writing on a specific topic as well.

Valerie Robins's curator insight, June 11, 10:14 AM

If you don’t consider yourself a writer, aren’t entirely comfortable with the writing process and can’t outsource to a professional, that doesn’t mean you’re dead in the water. Nor does it mean you should shrug and put out subpar content because, “Hey, I’m not a writer. That’s as good as it gets.”


Try one or more of these techniques the next time you put pencil to paper – or fingers to keyboard – for writing that has a whole lot more marketing punch....

Rescooped by Kelsey Green from Leading Schools
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7 Unconventional Reasons Why You Absolutely Should Be Reading Books

7 Unconventional Reasons Why You Absolutely Should Be Reading Books | Reading & Writing | Scoop.it
In a world of omnipresent screens, it can be easy to forget the simple pleasure of curling up with a good book. In fact, a recent HuffPost/YouGov poll of 1,000 U.S. adults found that 28 percent hadn't read one at all in the past year.

Via Mel Riddile
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Rescooped by Kelsey Green from Empathy and Compassion
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Reading literary fiction improves empathy, study finds

Reading literary fiction improves empathy, study finds | Reading & Writing | Scoop.it

New research shows works by writers such as Charles Dickens and Téa Obreht sharpen our ability to understand others' emotions – more than thrillers or romance novels, writes Liz Bury

 

Have you ever felt that reading a good book makes you better able to connect with your fellow human beings? If so, the results of a new scientific study back you up, but only if your reading material is literaryfiction – pulp fiction or non-fiction will not do.

 

Psychologists David Comer Kidd and Emanuele Castano, at the New School for Social Research in New York, have proved that reading literary fiction enhances the ability to detect and understand other people's emotions, a crucial skill in navigating complex social relationships.


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Claire Williams's curator insight, October 8, 2013 9:46 AM

This article from the gaurdien, states that reading fiction helps a persons empathy. Even though this article does not nessicarily help a readers reading I found it interesting that reading fiction can help a person feel empathy.

Rescooped by Kelsey Green from iGeneration - 21st Century Education
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Help Students With Comprehension Through Collaborative Reading - Edudemic

Help Students With Comprehension Through Collaborative Reading - Edudemic | Reading & Writing | Scoop.it
Collaborative reading and digital devices can give students a huge boost in comprehension. How? Take a look at these great tips from Holly Clark.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Rescooped by Kelsey Green from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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10 words to cut from your writing

10 words to cut from your writing | Reading & Writing | Scoop.it
As Mark Twain famously wrote, "I didn't have time to write a short letter, so I wrote a long one instead." His point? Strong writing is lean writing.

Via Thomas Faltin
Kelsey Green's insight:

Helpful in terms of useless things in writing that can be eliminated.

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