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Should we tell kids to skip the SAT? by Lane Brown, CSM

Should we tell kids to skip the SAT? by Lane Brown, CSM | Reading & Writing | Scoop.it
A new study published by the National Association for College Admission Counseling explains that optional testing policies for universities, instead of requiring SAT or ACT scores, can provide a broader reach for finding talented students.

Via Lou Salza
Evelyn Navarro's insight:

I actually was very happy when I read the title of this page! Hell yeah! I personally dislike taking tests who mark you down into a group of not equip to take certain classes, it lowers my self esteem in fact. It also sucks for those who also have awesome GPA's but are too nervous when it come to tests like the SAT and ACT and earn a low grade. Honestly I believe any state testing regiments lower students capability to think out the box were all restricted by standards to teach out of those barriers because it illegal. What about our critical thinking? All these standards lower our capabilities of critical thinking which in reality isn't benefiting any one nor this country.

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Lou Salza's curator insight, February 20, 2014 12:03 AM

Time to re- examine this 20th C practice!--Lou

Excerpt:

"...The study says that it investigated admissions standards "in four categories: twenty private colleges and universities, six public universities, five minority-serving institutions, and two arts institutions, a total of approximately 123,000 student records at institutions with enrollments from 50,000 students to 350, located in twenty-two US states and territories."  

According to the results, "non-submitters" earned cumulative grade-point averages that were only 0.05 points lower than "submitters" on the 4.0 GPA scale. The difference in graduation rates between the groups was 0.6 percent. Both stats are considered trivial differences by the study authors. 

Also, the study found that those students with higher high school GPAs performed better in college, regardless of drooping test scores in their records. Meanwhile, those students with weaker overall high school GPAs, despite instances of higher standardized test scores, still delivered lower cumulative GPAs in college. 

The study also reviewed who is most likely to take advantage of optional testing policies, and found that "Non-submitters are more likely to be women, first-generation-to-college, all categories of minority students, Pell grant recipients, and students with Learning Differences.".."

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Introduction to the special issue: early literacy among monolingual and bilingual children - Springer

Introduction to the special issue: early literacy among monolingual and bilingual children - Springer | Reading & Writing | Scoop.it
Evelyn Navarro's insight:

I personally thought this article was eye catching because I personally am a bilingual speaker. I started speaking English from a young age then grew to speaking Spanish later because i think i was forced to, i was in speech for a number of years because they assumed i was mute but more in fact i did not want to speak Spanish to any one. but this article helped because I'm glad I was to speak spanish because its benefited me by taking spanish ap cources in high school now i don't need to take my time to take spanish courses in college. even though i have my spanish units done, i will be getting a minor in spanish for future reference especially because i am a business major student.  

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Rescooped by Evelyn Navarro from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Should we tell kids to skip the SAT? by Lane Brown, CSM

Should we tell kids to skip the SAT? by Lane Brown, CSM | Reading & Writing | Scoop.it
A new study published by the National Association for College Admission Counseling explains that optional testing policies for universities, instead of requiring SAT or ACT scores, can provide a broader reach for finding talented students.

Via Lou Salza
Evelyn Navarro's insight:

I actually was very happy when I read the title of this page! Hell yeah! I personally dislike taking tests who mark you down into a group of not equip to take certain classes, it lowers my self esteem in fact. It also sucks for those who also have awesome GPA's but are too nervous when it come to tests like the SAT and ACT and earn a low grade. Honestly I believe any state testing regiments lower students capability to think out the box were all restricted by standards to teach out of those barriers because it illegal. What about our critical thinking? All these standards lower our capabilities of critical thinking which in reality isn't benefiting any one nor this country.

more...
Lou Salza's curator insight, February 20, 2014 12:03 AM

Time to re- examine this 20th C practice!--Lou

Excerpt:

"...The study says that it investigated admissions standards "in four categories: twenty private colleges and universities, six public universities, five minority-serving institutions, and two arts institutions, a total of approximately 123,000 student records at institutions with enrollments from 50,000 students to 350, located in twenty-two US states and territories."  

According to the results, "non-submitters" earned cumulative grade-point averages that were only 0.05 points lower than "submitters" on the 4.0 GPA scale. The difference in graduation rates between the groups was 0.6 percent. Both stats are considered trivial differences by the study authors. 

Also, the study found that those students with higher high school GPAs performed better in college, regardless of drooping test scores in their records. Meanwhile, those students with weaker overall high school GPAs, despite instances of higher standardized test scores, still delivered lower cumulative GPAs in college. 

The study also reviewed who is most likely to take advantage of optional testing policies, and found that "Non-submitters are more likely to be women, first-generation-to-college, all categories of minority students, Pell grant recipients, and students with Learning Differences.".."

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SAT to drop essay requirement, return to old scoring system

SAT to drop essay requirement, return to old scoring system | Reading & Writing | Scoop.it
Washington Post: The SAT college admission test will no longer require a timed essay, will dwell less on fancy vocabulary and will return to the familiar 1600-point scoring scale in a major overhaul...
Evelyn Navarro's insight:
From reading this article I was very surprised! I can't believe that their actually changing the SAT from having a timed essay to none! What made them change that specific section? Why would this make testing scores easier? I was actually very jealous hearing this! My initial reaction was " Really? The students of 2016 don't have to take but I did? I believe that with change more students will be part taking in going to 4 year universities making it easier to enter, and having in increase of students being accepted.
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Lev Gonick: How Technology Will Reshape Academe After the Economic Crisis – Wired Campus - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Lev Gonick: How Technology Will Reshape Academe After the Economic Crisis – Wired Campus - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Reading & Writing | Scoop.it
Evelyn Navarro's insight:

I thought it was remarkable that the country itself doubts that the financial stability as a country will never better it self. This leading with college and universities being affected, which textbook purchases many students would rather spend their money on buying a eBooks instead of the hard copy. Leading competition with universities not making enough profit for every book being sold to students. Which leads many universities to update their teaching strategies and use higher end modern 21st century technology.

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