Reading & Writing
24 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Brenda J. Alegria
Scoop.it!

rosenberg--reading-games.pdf

Brenda J. Alegria's insight:

I got this article from writingspaces.org. This articles about reading games and how to read academic writing, not harder but smarter.  It relates to what we have talked about in class about joining in on the conversation, finding what the writer is writing about and why. One thing the author says to do is talk about the text with professor and peers and make it a sociable interaction. One must learn to listen in class, as to why the professor gave you the text to read; they should be able to give you some insights, especially when the writer is not writing for your specific writing. Also one should pay attention to the title it should give you a good insight into what the text is about. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Brenda J. Alegria
Scoop.it!

antlitz--taking-flight.pdf

Brenda J. Alegria's insight:

I found this article in writingspaces.org.  I really liked this article because I talks about the difficulties beginner writers have to come up with a topic to write about, and I am one of those writers.  The article states that one should take a look and their own individual identity or interest to develop ideas on potential topics for the writing. Once a topic is found one needs to find a way to connect it to the world so that the audience is able to understand its effectiveness. This article reminded me on my own struggles to come up with a topic to research and how I thought about my interest and that is how I found the topic of circumcision and then I related it to the world so others could understand why it was that I wrote the paper. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Brenda J. Alegria
Scoop.it!

reid--ten-ways-to-think.pdf

Brenda J. Alegria's insight:

I found this article in writingspaces.org and according to the proffesor Kim, it's credible site.  I found this article intresting because it relates to what we've been discussing in class on how we learn all these rules about writing, that it makes writing a dreadful task.  In the article is state three things we should know about writing that will be beneficial.  One write about what you know or like.  Two, show don't tell.  Three, adapt to the audience and the purpose you're writing for. Its about what you want to write about, not how they tell you to write.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Brenda J. Alegria
Scoop.it!

purdy--wikipedia-is-good-for-you.pdf

Brenda J. Alegria's insight:

I found this interesting because so many professors are opposes that students use wiki. In the article it states that wiki can be used, but it all depends on how and why you use it.  They say ist a great way to review and other things that might get you started on your research.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Brenda J. Alegria from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Does reading literature increase empathy?

Does reading literature increase empathy? | Reading & Writing | Scoop.it

Here's a report on a series of studies that purport to show that reading a few minutes of "literary fiction" improves scores on a test of emotional empathy ("Reading the Mind in the Eyes"), compared to reading non-fiction. Reading popular fiction did nothing to improve scores over those of non-reading controls.

New York Times

People ranging in age from 18 to 75 were recruited for each of five experiments. They were paid $2 or $3 each to read for a few minutes. Some were given excerpts from award-winning literary fiction (Don DeLillo, Wendell Berry). Others were given best sellers like Gillian Flynn’s “Gone Girl,” a Rosamunde Pilcher romance or a Robert Heinlein science fiction tale.

 

...As I have suggested before, I would rather engage in psychotherapy with a therapist who reads Dostoevsky and Melville than with one who reads books about the brain. It would be lovely if a case could be built that shows that the reading of literature can make you a better (e.g., more empathetic) person.

 

by Glenn Sullivan 


Via Edwin Rutsch
Brenda J. Alegria's insight:

I found this article intresting in how studies were conducted to see if reading fiction increases empathy skills. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Brenda J. Alegria
Scoop.it!

Hello Kitty jet landing in L.A. soon

Hello Kitty jet landing in L.A. soon | Reading & Writing | Scoop.it
Twenty five years ago, a giant black and white killer whale decorated the fuselage of a Southwest Airlines 737-300 as part of a promotional deal with Sea World.
Brenda J. Alegria's insight:

I found this article in LA times.  This article is amusing, but at the same time it gives a good look into what businesses do to promote and gain more customers.  For those that are not a fan of hello kitty it would be an overwhelming flight, but through a business perspective; I believe this is a great idea since so many are fans of hello kitty and will fly people from LAX to parts of Asia where this character originated.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Brenda J. Alegria
Scoop.it!

dasbender--critical-thinking.pdf

Brenda J. Alegria's insight:

I found this article in writingspaces.org. This article talks about critical thinking and how many feel afraid of critical thinking. It is not about criticizing the text, or attacking the writer, but rather is the process of responding to and evaluating ideas, arguments and styles so the reader understands how and why you value the items.  Critical thinking is good for the reader because to engage critically with a text you have to read attentively and with an open mind. As stated in the article, to be a critical thinker you must ask yourself questions as you read. Keep track of all the important points the writer makes by jotting down a list of ideas or quotations.  It also states the Importance of summarize quotes that may be to long and summarizing help understand why the writer quoted it. Another piece of advice given was to write a personal response to what the writer has said; if it reminded you of somethething (write about it). Then move from personal back to academic to build analysis and response. This article made critical thinking and building a critical response so much more simple. 

more...
Brenda J. Alegria's comment, September 15, 2013 3:59 PM
This article was taken from writingspaces.org. I found that this article goes hand in hand with reading like a writer, because they both require you to ask yourself thoughtful questions about the text as well to make observations. Criticism is the process of responding to and evaluating ideas, argument, and style so that readers understand how and why you value these items. Criticism was defined in the article, because that's one of the things readers must do for critical thinking, and I believe that is what you also have to do to read like a writer.
Brenda J. Alegria's comment, September 15, 2013 3:59 PM
This article was taken from writingspaces.org. I found that this article goes hand in hand with reading like a writer, because they both require you to ask yourself thoughtful questions about the text as well to make observations. Criticism is the process of responding to and evaluating ideas, argument, and style so that readers understand how and why you value these items. Criticism was defined in the article, because that's one of the things readers must do for critical thinking, and I believe that is what you also have to do to read like a writer.
Brenda J. Alegria's comment, September 15, 2013 3:59 PM
This article was taken from writingspaces.org. I found that this article goes hand in hand with reading like a writer, because they both require you to ask yourself thoughtful questions about the text as well to make observations. Criticism is the process of responding to and evaluating ideas, argument, and style so that readers understand how and why you value these items. Criticism was defined in the article, because that's one of the things readers must do for critical thinking, and I believe that is what you also have to do to read like a writer.