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The Overview § Gates of Harvard Yard

The Overview § Gates of Harvard Yard | Reading, Writing, and Thinking | Scoop.it

From the majestic Johnston Gate to the striped Dexter Gate and its oft-quoted inscription, “Enter to Grow in Wisdom,” the iconic portals that enclose Harvard Yard are as much a part of the Cambridge experience as Georgian cupolas silhouetted against the sky and rowing shells skimming over the Charles River.

The gates represent a legacy of enormous  value, one that reflects the talents of their architects, the vision of Harvard’s leaders and the generosity of the university’s graduates, from a Wall Street financier who successfully defended the America’s Cup to a fellow of considerably more modest means who pledged $2 for the Class of 1889 Gate—to be paid in two installments.

Yet the the gates are not widely appreciated, especially by the students who scurry through them. And their complete story—a tale of wealth, power, artistic vision, institutional and personal ambition, love and human tragedy—has never before been fully told.


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Anne Bosworth's insight:

An interesting and worthwhile read...

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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, February 4, 2013 4:47 PM

This is truly superb. A just-held, week long Nieman class at Harvard, the subject of which is, collectively, Harvard's 26 gates. Beautiful photographs and beautiful writing. We're sure many SCUPers will love this resource.


"Harvard has every reason to be proud of its gates, an extraordinary collection of architectural gems. Yet many of them could use a little buffing and a lot of TLC. We hope the publication of these essays will lead to a broader appreciation of the gates’ history and design—and a new resolve to treat their distinguished legacy with the care and respect it richly deserves.

—Blair Kamin 
Chicago Tribune architecture critic and 2013 Nieman Fellow"

Rogier Warnawa's curator insight, March 20, 2013 7:45 PM

add your insight...

 
Rescooped by Anne Bosworth from SCUP Links
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College as Country Club: Do Colleges Cater to Students' Preferences for Consumption? (PDF)

College as Country Club: Do Colleges Cater to Students' Preferences for Consumption? (PDF) | Reading, Writing, and Thinking | Scoop.it

This paper investigates whether demand-side market pressure explains colleges’ decisions to provide consumption amenities to their students. We estimate a discrete choice model of college demand using micro data from the high school classes of 1992 and 2004, matched to extensive information on all four-year colleges in the U.S. We find that most students do appear to value college consumption amenities, including spending on student activities, sports, and dormitories. While this taste for amenities is broad-based, the taste for academic quality is confined to high-achieving students. The heterogeneity in student preferences implies that colleges face very different incentives depending on their current student body and the students who the institution hopes to attract. We estimate that the elasticities implied by our demand model can account for 16 percent of the total variation across colleges in the ratio of amenity to academic spending, and including them on top of key observable characteristics (sector, state, size, selectivity) increases the explained variation by twenty percent.


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Anne Bosworth's insight:

What else can they do when we've collectively created a culture that insists on college for anyone who wants a good job? Businesses often use a college degree as a tool of exclusion, so more and more people want one. Mix this in with the wider issues of consumer culture, the change from college as intellectual exercise to college as vocational training, and our increasing culture of entitlement and I'd expect nothing but increased demands upon colleges to meet student "appetites."

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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, January 29, 2013 9:45 AM

An excellent read. As well, the related Inside Higher Ed story by Scott Jaschik, The Customer is Always Right, includes some good analysis and reaction to this paper by other higher education experts such as Jane V. Wellman, a Planning for Higher Education contributor.


For The Chronicle of Higher Education, Scott Carlson writes this up as What's the Payoff for the 'Country Club' College?