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Rescooped by Karen LaBonte from Teaching & Learning in the Digital Age
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Social media: A guide for researchers (and everyone else) | Research Information Network

Social media: A guide for researchers (and everyone else) | Research Information Network | Reading that looks interesting | Scoop.it

 

"This guide has been produced by the International Centre for Guidance Studies, and aims to provide the information needed to make an informed decision about using social media and select from the vast range of tools that are available."

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The Anti-Social Media | Breaking Connections Since 2010

The Anti-Social Media | Breaking Connections Since 2010 | Reading that looks interesting | Scoop.it
The best social media satire. Ever.Written by Jay Dolan...
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K12 Education: 21st Century Skills PD, Technology Integration Resources and Software Training and Support | K-12 Professional Development - Atomic Learning

K12 Education: 21st Century Skills PD, Technology Integration Resources and Software Training and Support | K-12 Professional Development - Atomic Learning | Reading that looks interesting | Scoop.it
Atomic Learning offers on-demand solutions for 21st Century Skills professional development, technology integration and software training and support that simplifies educational technology.
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Rescooped by Karen LaBonte from Design, Literacy and Multimodality
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4 Inspiring Examples of Digital Storytelling

4 Inspiring Examples of Digital Storytelling | Reading that looks interesting | Scoop.it
Today's artists are creating interactive, multimedia experiences where the audience can actively reshape the stories themselves.

 

[An introduction to: Bear 71; Pandemic; Welcome to Pine Point; and Rome.]


Via The Digital Rocking Chair, Matthew Hall
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Sherry Turkle: Connected, but alone?

As we expect more from technology, do we expect less from each other? Sherry Turkle studies how our devices and online personas are redefi...


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Rescooped by Karen LaBonte from Design, Literacy and Multimodality
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Museum Box tools for you to build up an argument or description of an event, person or historical period

Museum Box tools for you to build up an argument or description of an event, person or historical period | Reading that looks interesting | Scoop.it

Welcome to Museum Box,

 

This site provides the tools for you to build up an argument or description of an event, person or historical period by placing items in a virtual box. What items, for example, would you put in a box to describe your life; the life of a Victorian Servant or Roman soldier; or to show that slavery was wrong and unnecessary?

 

You can display anything from a text file to a movie. You can also view and comment on the museum boxes submitted by others.


Via Gust MEES, HASTAC, Matthew Hall
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Learning and Teaching Writing | Education.com

Learning and Teaching Writing | Education.com | Reading that looks interesting | Scoop.it
WRITING DEVELOPMENT
Not surprisingly, these two basic approaches to conceptualizing writing have led to different views of writing development. For example, Graham (2006) argued that four catalysts spur writing development. These involve changes in writer's strategic or self-regulatory behaviors (e.g., becoming more sophisticated in planning), motivation (e.g., heightened sense of efficacy about one's writing capabilities), knowledge (e.g., increased knowledge about the attributes and structures of different types of writing), and skills (e.g., automatization of handwriting and spelling and proficiency in sentence construction). These catalysts all reside within the individual, and this approach to development is consistent with cognitive/ motivational theories of writing.

In contrast, Schultz and Fecho (2000) offer a different view of writing development—one that is consistent with sociocultural theories of writing. They argue that writing development reflects and contributes to the social, historical, political, and institutional contexts in which it occurs; varies across the school, home, and work contexts in which it is situated; is shaped by the curriculum and pedagogical decisions made by teachers and schools; tied to the social identity of the writer(s), and is greatly influenced by the social interactions surrounding writing.

These two approaches (and the theories underlying them) clearly privilege different aspects of writing and writing development. However, neither is complete, as cognitive/motivational views pay relatively little attention to context, and sociocultural views do not adequately address how individual factors shape writing development. ...

Via anna smith
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Rescooped by Karen LaBonte from Infotention
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The Information Diet - Introduction

"http://informationdiet.com -- Introduction to the concepts behind The Information Diet, a new book by Clay Johnson. The Information Diet makes the case that it's time we started being as selective with the information we consume as we are the food that we eat, then describes what a healthy diet and healthy habits look like."


Via Howard Rheingold
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Simplifying my digital habits | Yes and Space

Simplifying my digital habits | Yes and Space | Reading that looks interesting | Scoop.it

"I started thinking and drawing about the many & varied ways I store, share, create and consume media and information. So this map emerged and it has provided me with a simpler ‘way’ of doing stuff this year."


Via Howard Rheingold
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Improve Your Google Search Skills [Infographic] - How-To Geek

Improve Your Google Search Skills [Infographic] - How-To Geek | Reading that looks interesting | Scoop.it
Don’t limit yourself to just plugging in simple search terms to Google; check out this infographic and learn a search string search or two.
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Rescooped by Karen LaBonte from Design, Literacy and Multimodality
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Why Design Matters (Now More than Ever)

Why Design Matters (Now More than Ever) | Reading that looks interesting | Scoop.it

We all know that design can play an essential role in the success of a new product or company, and it’s no secret that many of the most celebrated companies at the moment—Apple and Target come to mind—lead all their efforts with design and branding....


Via HASTAC, Matthew Hall
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Rescooped by Karen LaBonte from Digital scholar(ship)
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George Veletsianos, Digital scholarship practices: Students and researchers working around the system

Through my research on the practices of digital scholars (i.e. individuals who use emerging technologies for purposes relating to networked participatory scholarship) I have discovered another way that individuals use to ...

Via antonella esposito
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Rescooped by Karen LaBonte from Best Finds
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The History Of Learning Tools [Infographic]

The History Of Learning Tools [Infographic] | Reading that looks interesting | Scoop.it

You’re going to want to print out this infographic and, at the very least, share it with your fellow teachers and even students. It’s all about the history of education technology and could be used to educate just about anyone on how far we’ve come in a short period of time. We did a more in-depth look at the history of education technology about a year ago but this infographic is a lot more… fun.

 

Anyway, the below infographic from CTU can be viewed below or downloaded as a PDF here (so you can fire up that color printer). Enjoy the walk down memory lane!

 


Via Gust MEES, Bob Sprankle
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François Arnal's curator insight, April 11, 2013 2:32 AM

De l'ardoise à la tablette, du projecteur de diapositive au vidéoprojecteur interactif...

Rescooped by Karen LaBonte from Design, Literacy and Multimodality
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Francesco Franchi on Visual Storytelling and Representation vs. Interpretation

Francesco Franchi on Visual Storytelling and Representation vs. Interpretation | Reading that looks interesting | Scoop.it
On the design as journalism and how to navigate the spectrum between art and information.

Via Matthew Hall
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From Rapunzel to The Little Red Riding Hood, Beloved Children’s Classics as Minimalist Posters

From Rapunzel to The Little Red Riding Hood, Beloved Children’s Classics as Minimalist Posters | Reading that looks interesting | Scoop.it

Visual hyper-distillation of iconic storytelling.


Via Matthew Hall
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Rescooped by Karen LaBonte from Infographics ideas for Education
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Open Site - wikipedia

Open Site - wikipedia | Reading that looks interesting | Scoop.it

Great infographic on redefining research with Wikipedia. I first saw this on Ian Addison's website http://ianaddison.net/can-you-really-trust-wikipedia/


Via Jacqui Sharp
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Cautionary Tales in Transmedia Storytelling

Cautionary Tales in Transmedia Storytelling | Reading that looks interesting | Scoop.it
One of the greatest challenges in transmedia game development is crafting a believable story universe that persists across multiple media wi...
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Excerpt from The Information Diet, by Clay Johnson - Boing Boing

Excerpt from The Information Diet, by Clay Johnson - Boing Boing | Reading that looks interesting | Scoop.it

"The modern human animal spends upwards of 11 hours out of every 24 in a state of constant consumption. Not eating, but gorging on information ceaselessly spewed from the screens and speakers we hold dear. Just as we have grown morbidly obese on sugar, fat, and flour—so, too, have we become gluttons for texts, instant messages, emails, RSS feeds, downloads, videos, status updates, and tweets.

We're all battling a storm of distractions, buffeted with notifications and tempted by tasty tidbits of information. And just as too much junk food can lead to obesity, too much junk information can lead to cluelessness. The Information Diet shows you how to thrive in this information glut—what to look for, what to avoid, and how to be selective. In the process, author Clay Johnson explains the role information has played throughout history, and why following his prescribed diet is essential for everyone who strives to be smart, productive, and sane."


Via Howard Rheingold
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Encouraging Distraction? Classroom Experiments with Mobile Media - ProfHacker - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Encouraging Distraction? Classroom Experiments with Mobile Media - ProfHacker - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Reading that looks interesting | Scoop.it

"My work in the area of mobile technology and my experience using mobile devices in the classroom gives me some strong reservations with the idea that our devices are luring us away from a deep connection with each other and with our spaces. While our device can and do pull us away from a deep engagement with people and spaces, this doesn’t have to be the default mode for the ways we use our mobile media. Instead, if used in a dynamic way that addresses the medium’s strengths, mobile media can actually get us to engage with each other and with the spaces we move through in deep, meaningful, and context-rich ways."


Via Howard Rheingold
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Framework for Success Postsecondary Writing PDF

"Habits of mind refers to ways of approaching learning that are both intellectual and practical and that will support students’ success in a variety of fields and disciplines. The Framework identifies eight habits of mind essential for success in college writing:


• Curiosity – the desire to know more about the world.
• Openness – the willingness to consider new ways of being and thinking in the world.
• Engagement – a sense of investment and involvement in learning.
• Creativity – the ability to use novel approaches for generating, investigating, and representing ideas.
• Persistence – the ability to sustain interest in and attention to short- and long-term projects.
• Responsibility – the ability to take ownership of one’s actions and understand the consequences of those actions for oneself and others.
• Flexibility – the ability to adapt to situations, expectations, or demands.
• Metacognition – the ability to reflect on one’s own thinking as well as on the individual and cultural processes used to structure knowledge.


The Framework then explains how teachers can foster these habits of mind through writing, reading, and critical analysis experiences. These experiences aim to develop students’
• Rhetorical knowledge – the ability to analyze and act on understandings of audiences, purposes, and contexts in creating and comprehending texts;
• Critical thinking – the ability to analyze a situation or text and make thoughtful decisions based on that analysis, through writing, reading, and research;
• Writing processes – multiple strategies to approach and undertake writing and research;
• Knowledge of conventions – the formal and informal guidelines that define what is considered to be correct and appropriate, or incorrect and inappropriate, in a piece of writing; and
• Ability to compose in multiple environments – from traditional pen and paper to electronic technologies.


Via anna smith
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Rescooped by Karen LaBonte from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Social Learning

Social Learning | Reading that looks interesting | Scoop.it

"Social learning theory is the idea that people learn most effectively when they interact with other learners about a given topic. Educational psychologists refer to this as social constructivism. Recent credibility for this theory comes from a study by Dr. Richard J. Light (Harvard School of Education) that identify factors that lead to success for college students. According to Dr. Light, the strongest determinant of students’ success in college—even more than the details of their instructors’ teaching styles—is their ability to form or participate in small study groups. Students who studied in groups, even only once a week, were more engaged in their studies, were better prepared for class, and learned significantly more than students who worked on their own."


Via Martin R. Bérubé, Gust MEES
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Information Forensics: Five Case Studies on How to Verify Crowdsourced Information from Social Media | Truthiness in Digital Media

"False information can cost lives. But no information can also cost lives, especially in a crisis zone. Indeed, information is perishable so the potential value of information must be weighed against the urgency of the situation. Correct information that arrives too late is useless. Crowdsourced information can provide rapid situational awareness, especially when added to a live crisis map. But information in the social media space may not be reliable or immediately verifiable. This may explain why humanitarian (and news) organizations are often reluctant to leverage crowdsourced crisis maps. Many believe that verifying crowdsourced information is either too challenging or impossible.The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that concrete strategies do exist for the verification of geo-referenced crowdsourced social media information.The study first provides a brief introduction to crisis mapping and argues that crowdsourcing is simply non-probability sampling.Next, five case studies comprising various efforts to verify social media are analyzed to demonstrate how different verification strategies work."

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EDGEx 2012 Conference Backchannel: Collected Resources #EDGEX2012 | David Kelly

EDGEx 2012 Conference Backchannel: Collected Resources #EDGEX2012 | David Kelly | Reading that looks interesting | Scoop.it
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