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New Research Confirms Third Grade Reading’s Importance

New Research Confirms Third Grade Reading’s Importance | Reading Research | Scoop.it
In a new report, “Early Warning Confirmed: A Research Update on Third-Grade Reading,” the Annie E. Casey Foundation follows up on its earlier research about the importance of promoting children’s r...
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Marzano Research Laboratory: Online Course - Becoming a Reflective Teacher

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The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American | Reading Research | Scoop.it
E-readers and tablets are becoming more popular as such technologies improve, but research suggests that reading on paper still boasts unique advantages

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Cyd Madsen's curator insight, May 16, 2013 12:57 AM

Hmmmmm.......

Lou Salza's curator insight, May 16, 2013 8:53 AM

I have been using text to speech almost exclusively for reading articles on the web, newspapers, and courese reading for a course in Leadership I am taking at Case Western Reserve University. I love the e-readers ( Read and Write Gold; Kindle, and Audio books)  because I can jack up the speed and read with my ears as fast as non dyslexics who are fluent readers read with their eyes. We need to understand the 'cost' of eye reading to dyslexic students even when they "graduate" from OG or Wilson: the burden of phonological processing is too high in terms of fatigue. If we don't make the technology more available and acceptable in schools we will deny intelligent students with print challenges the opportunity to study in college, graduate or professional schools. 

I still read paper books.  Right now I am reading  A light in August by Faulkner. It is on my night stand and it is a wonderful if slow experience for me. For some, print will never 'fall away' and allow for effortless decoding and pholonological recoding.--Lou  

 

Excerpt:

"Understanding how reading on paper is different from reading on screens requires some explanation of how the brain interprets written language. We often think of reading as a cerebral activity concerned with the abstract—with thoughts and ideas, tone and themes, metaphors and motifs. As far as our brains are concerned, however, text is a tangible part of the physical world we inhabit. In fact, the brain essentially regards letters as physical objects because it does not really have another way of understanding them. As Wolf explains in her book Proust and the Squid, we are not born with brain circuits dedicated to reading. After all, we did not invent writing until relatively recently in our evolutionary history, around the fourth millennium B.C. So the human brain improvises a brand-new circuit for reading by weaving together various regions of neural tissue devoted to other abilities, such as spoken language, motor coordination and vision..."

AnnC's curator insight, May 22, 2013 7:57 PM

Check out the debate.

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Why good writing matters | Reading, Writing, Research

Why good writing matters | Reading, Writing, Research | Reading Research | Scoop.it
Reading, Writing, Research - a librarian's blog for anyone who needs to do research (this means you!
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Teaching To Exceed The English Language Arts Common Core State Standards: A Literacy Practices Approach For 6-12 Classrooms, englishccss / FrontPage

Teaching To Exceed The English Language Arts Common Core State Standards: A Literacy Practices Approach For 6-12 Classrooms, englishccss / FrontPage | Reading Research | Scoop.it

This site provides resources for the book, Teaching To Exceed The English Language Arts Common Core State Standards: A Literacy Practices Approach For 6-12 Classrooms, by Richard Beach, University of Minnesota; Amanda Haertling Thein, University of Iowa; and Allen Webb, Western Michigan University, Routledge Press, 2012. Order from Routledge Press. Order from Amazon, including a Kindle e-book version.



As the new English Language Arts Common Core State Standards take hold across the United States, the need grows to for pre‐service and in‐service teachers to be ready to develop curriculum and instruction that addresses their requirements. This timely, thoughtful, and comprehensive text directly meets this need. The literacy practices and critical engagement curriculum framework for 6‐12 English language arts education it sets forth explains and illustrates how the Standards’ highest and best intentions for student success can be implemented from a critical, culturally relevant perspective that is firmly grounded in current literacy learning theory and research.

The first 6‐12 English language arts methods text to be aligned with the Standards, this text also addresses their limitations — formalist assumptions about literacy learning, limited attention to media/digital literacies, lack of attention to critical literacies, and developmental assumptions about linking standards and text complexity to specific grade levels — and shows how these limitations can be surpassed through adoption of a literacy practices/critical engagement curriculum framework. Specific examples of teachers using this approach to interpreting and translating the Standards bring it to life.

Features:
Moves the CCSS framework into a view that literacy is a contextualized, social practice
Challenges simplistic models that homogenize adolescent learners
Adds the important element of critical literacy to English language arts classrooms
Provides specific examples of teachers in action implementing these practices
Interactive Website with virtual case-study examples for each chapter based on challenges faced by teacher. This site is designed to foster interactivity — including an online teaching planning simulation with a text, video, or case on one side of the screen and a box to enter in reactions and planning decisions on the other side, and a social networking/chat component for instructors and students to share their reactions and ideas.
Extensive resources and related readings that are continually updated on this wiki site
Routledge Companion Website with additional teaching units.

Selected Table of Contents:
Part I. Foundations: What is Effective English Language Arts Instruction?
Part II. Implementing and Exceeding the Common Core State Standards
Part III. Evaluation, Assessment, and Reflection

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Angela K. Adams's curator insight, October 24, 2015 2:20 PM

Government issues - I chose this resource because it provide information on how to effectively implement common core in English classes K-12. I hope to share this with the principals at IAF and our English teachers to provide them with the resources they may need to follow common core regulations.