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Listen A Minute: Easier English Listening and Activities

Listen A Minute: Easier English Listening and Activities | Learning outside class | Scoop.it
English lesson plans: Free EFL/ESL lesson handouts (477 so far), online activities and handouts for teaching and learning listening.
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Useful listening site with some really well thought out extension activities.

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Oscar Wilde's most enduring epigrams – infographic

Oscar Wilde's most enduring epigrams – infographic | Learning outside class | Scoop.it
Probably the most-quoted author after Shakespeare, and certainly the wittiest, here's a look at his most lasting lines...
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Ghosts of War

Ghosts of War | Learning outside class | Scoop.it
The remarkable pictures show scenes from France today with atmospheric photographs taken in the same place during the war superimposed on top.

 

In this fastinating set of images, Dutch artist and historian Jo Teeuwisse merges her passions literally by superimposing World War II photographs on to modern pictures of the where the photos were originally taken.  This serves as a reminder that places are rich with history; to understand the geography of a place, one must also know it's history (and vice versa).   

 

Tags: Europe, war, images, historial, place. 


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Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:26 AM

I'm not even sure what to say about this set of pictures exactly, except that they're a very cool way to see history. I'm interesting in Social Studies and history because I'm captivated by seeing the world framed in a story, and these images do just that. To see the same places where the war was fought and what has changed is great, but these photos also give the impression of some stories of war. The idea of them being "ghosts" gives the impression of something left behind which marks the land even to this day.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:56 PM

Very interesting, I've seen similar things done with Russian cities and parts of the Ukaranian country side.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:47 PM

This Dutch historian does a great job at interweaving places that were ridden by the second world war to its modern reconstruct. As a child, I use to question a lot what a place looked like prior to it being destroyed. In the context of Europe a continent, ridden by war, the historian not only does a great job at depicting past and present, her photographs also show how the country's government went to great lengths to preserve some of its land's historic sites.

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Unused Words - Discover a new word every day

Unused Words - Discover a new word every day | Learning outside class | Scoop.it

This is a great resource if you want to amaze people with the depth aand complexity of your vocabulary. Although it is called 'Unused words', many of the words are still in use. The site gives some interesting information about the history and origin of th words too.


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11 Guerrilla Street Art Greats

11 Guerrilla Street Art Greats | Learning outside class | Scoop.it
When guerrilla-geographer Daniel Raven-Ellison travels, he always keep his eyes peeled for unexpected works of art that creatively subvert culture, rules, and politics and force us to see...

 

Not all cultural landscapes are officially sanctioned by city planners or government officials.  These landscapes of resistance are often poignant critiques on society and represent the mulitplicity of voices within places.  There isn't one "Geography" with a capital G of a given place, but many geographies.  Many people and demographic groups interact and use the same place in distinct ways and the meaning of that place is socially mediated within the cultural landscape.   

 

Tags: art, landscape, culture, place, unit 3 culture.


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When typography meets street art: 60 top-notch examples of freehand graffiti letters

When typography meets street art: 60 top-notch examples of freehand graffiti letters | Learning outside class | Scoop.it
Blog of Francesco Mugnai...

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Art Misfits's curator insight, August 15, 2013 11:05 PM

Freehand is hard enough, and to achieve the kind of sharp, straight edges that some of these works have must have taken some serious work from the artist(s). These were some beautiful examples of the kind of creativity that inspires.

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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | Learning outside class | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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105 Writing Tips from Professional Writers

105 Writing Tips from Professional Writers | Learning outside class | Scoop.it
Inspiring, informative, amusing, entertaining wisdom and quotes from top writers in all genres.
General Tips • Ernest Hemingway: Use short sentences and short first paragraphs. These rules were two of...
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The toughest competition faced by the best team in - 07.02.12 - SI Vault

The toughest competition faced by the best team in - 07.02.12 - SI Vault | Learning outside class | Scoop.it
The Greatest Game Nobody Ever Saw...
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THE BOOK RIOT 50: #1 Sixteen Things Calvin and Hobbes Said Better Than Anyone Else

THE BOOK RIOT 50: #1 Sixteen Things Calvin and Hobbes Said Better Than Anyone Else | Learning outside class | Scoop.it
To celebrate Book Riot's first birthday on Monday, we're running our best 50 posts from our first year this week. Click here for the running list. This po
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Wise words indeed. . .

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UK University Warns Computers Could Take Over The World

UK University Warns Computers Could Take Over The World | Learning outside class | Scoop.it
Scientists from one of the UK's leading universities, Cambridge, has warned that there's a chance AI computers will take over the world over the course of the next two centuries.A philosopher, a scientist and a software engineer have suggested...

 

INteresting short article for those into technology.

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The British have invaded 9 out of 10 countries

The British have invaded 9 out of 10 countries | Learning outside class | Scoop.it
Britain has invaded all but 22 countries in the world in its long and colourful history, new research has found.

 

This is a great map to show the historical impact of colonialism on the world map.  The map is based on the work in the new book All the Countries We've Ever Invaded: And the Few We Never Got Round To.   

 

Tags: book reviews, colonialism, war, historical, UK. 


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:33 PM

The British have done this in reality, in the physical world, in space and time... but perhaps the Chinese have done this in our minds!  Everything our country trades for has parts made in China.  We simply can't live without these things that may be invented in the US, and designed in the US, but assembled in China.... China has a name for itself, and they're playing a game of Monopoly.  They have hotels on Board walk and Park place, and they're eating us alive... I've conferred with politicians, who say that they're on the verge of turning their hidden empire into a physical one, and going from simple monetary domination to war.  They outnumber the US, and have better technology, and evidently more skill and products.  Not much to say about that, but if they learn from the mistakes of the British, the Chinese could really create a truly elite empire that could outlast any other in human history...  But really, if they include American/Chinese cuisine in their menu, I'm sold at General Tao's chicken... Go China! 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 8:36 PM

This map illustrates just how wide-reaching the British Empire was throughout its history. Though the map cheats a little by including the activities of sanctioned pirates and minor invasions, almost the whole world excepting several very small nations and some difficult to reach inland ones.

 

The most surprising was Sweden considering the proximity and the frequent viking invasions on the British isles which were apparently never reciprocated.

 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 10:26 AM

The British have had a powerful and colorful history. The British built an empire that has been unmatched in the history of human civilization. At its height, the sun never truly set on its empire. The impact the British Empire had on the globe is astounding. Almost every country in the world has some form of British heritage and influence. The influence has  had both positive and negative attributes. The British Empire spread both knowledge and Slavery to the rest of the globe. The world can never truly escape its British past.

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ClassBadges

ClassBadges | Learning outside class | Scoop.it

Keep your class movitated with this is behaviour management tool where teachers can award virtual badges for anything. Choose from a large collection of badge designs. The children can see their progress with their own personal login.

http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Classroom+Management+%26+Rewards

 

This takes a few days to get registered-be warned!

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Watch free documentary films online | Chockadoc.com

Watch free documentary films online | Chockadoc.com | Learning outside class | Scoop.it

This site has a huge collection of free to view documentaries on a really wide range of topics. Great to reinforce or extend your knowledge. Also great listening parctice.


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Helena's comment, October 11, 2012 7:44 PM
Love, love, love this.
Sue Valdeck's curator insight, February 16, 2013 1:26 AM

Another way to add variety to your ESL lessons!

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The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation

The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation | Learning outside class | Scoop.it
The Gangnam Style! sensation is all over the internet, complete with parodies that both honor and mock the original.  This first video is the original, which in a few short months received well ove...

 

The following link has the video, parodies and infographics to help student explore the meaning behind the cultural phenomenon. 


Questions to Ponder: Considering the concept of cultural diffusion, what do we make of this phenomenon? What cultural combinations are seen in this? How has the technological innovations changed how cultures interact, spread and are replicated?

 

Tags: popular culture, video, diffusion, globalization, culture, place, technology, unit 3 culture. 


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Rich's comment, October 3, 2012 2:27 PM
When I first saw this music video and heard the song I remember myself saying "I have no idea what is going on, but the human race is a better place thanks to this guy." I may not know what he is saying but it puts me in a great mood. This guy is breaking cultural and geographical boundaries with music.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2014 6:07 PM

Culture and globalization has spread this song across the United States breaking records and trending on sites such as Twitter. Our exposure to different cultures is great. However, if you do not like songs that get stuck in your head, do not listen to this song . LOL

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5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism

5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism | Learning outside class | Scoop.it
From technology to equality, five ways the world is getting better all the time...

 

This article by former President of the United States Bill Clinton, outlines numerous ways that globalization can improve the world, especially in developing regions.  He uses examples from around the world and includes numerous geographic themes. 

 

Technology-Phones mean freedom Health-Healthy communities prosper Economy-Green energy equals good business Equality-Women rule Justice-The fight for the future is now

 

Tags: technology, medical, economic, gender, class, globalization, development, worldwide.   


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LYRICSnMUSIC.COM — A Lyric and Music Search Engine for Music People by Music People

LYRICSnMUSIC.COM — A Lyric and Music Search Engine for Music People by Music People | Learning outside class | Scoop.it
A Lyrics and Music Search Engine — Song Lyrics, YouTube Videos, Band Bio's, Tour Dates and Guitar Tabs on one page.

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Man cycles across world for Games

Man cycles across world for Games | Learning outside class | Scoop.it
Chen Guanming cycled more than 37,000 miles from eastern China to London to "spread the Olympic spirit".
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