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Dyslexia: a way of living, not a problem!

Each special child, like every individual has many qualities. Highlight their qualities is absolutely positive, creates self-esteem and encourages personal g...
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Reading Enrichment And Development
Enriching and developing the love of reading
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iPad Resources – Common Core | A+ Educators

iPad Resources – Common Core | A+ Educators | Reading Enrichment And Development | Scoop.it

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Four Ways to Use an iPad to Help Us Meet the Common Core State S...

Choose/use apps that personalize learning, reveal student thinking, bridge connections, and create a sense of belonging

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TOP TEN REASONS TO HAVE STUDENTS BLOG ABOUT THEIR READING EXPERIENCES by Russ Anderson

TOP TEN REASONS TO HAVE STUDENTS BLOG ABOUT THEIR READING EXPERIENCES by Russ Anderson | Reading Enrichment And Development | Scoop.it
About a year and a half ago, a few of my colleagues and I had our students begin blogging about their independent reading. Some students finished four posts a year. Some students finished ten. Some...

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14 Ways for Teachers to Collaborate Online | Ed...

14 Ways for Teachers to Collaborate Online | Ed... | Reading Enrichment And Development | Scoop.it
Collaboration is an essential component of teachers' professional development. Collaboration has never been as easy as it is now especially with the advance of technology and widespread internet connection.

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Common Core State Standards Initiative | Home

Common Core State Standards Initiative | Home | Reading Enrichment And Development | Scoop.it

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Deborah Chad's curator insight, September 11, 2013 4:37 PM

Need to explore the site more

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Nonfiction as Mentor Text: Style

Nonfiction as Mentor Text: Style | Reading Enrichment And Development | Scoop.it
Nonfiction as Mentor Text: Style | On Common Core|School Library Journal http://t.co/OrRpUg4pKQ #engchat #ccss

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25 Signs You're Addicted To Books

The first step is admitting it. The second step is to keep right on reading.

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, May 28, 2013 11:22 AM

 Why Scoop an article that i found more annoying than interesting?

 

_____

 

But, first a concession. The "voice" of this article is not intended to be the voice of an educator. The intention of this article is not to engage reluctant readers. The intended audience for this article is probably those already engaged in a life-long reading habit. And, my criticism is probably more about the importance of considering one's audience than about the intentions of the author and receptiveness of her audience.

______

 

Okay, so why did I find the article annoying?

 

It wasn't the inclusion of a word too rude to share with students. It's easy enough to begin a scoopit comment with a warning in that regard.

 

It wasn't the use of the word "addicted" in the title. Though using words like "addicted" and "obsessed" as if they referenced something admirable is annoying to me.

 

It had more to do with portraying readers...

 

as weak

primarily women

choosing reading over responsibility

ridiculously emotional

incapable of reading without being emotionally wounded

snobs

mean

out of touch

snobs

afraid of the real world

snobs

lost in the real world

snobs

snobs

and did I mention snobs?

 

This is NOT a list of reasons to encourage young people to become readers.

 

DISCLAIMER: It's not that I can't take a joke or see an attempt to be humorous. But, with few exceptions, I can't help but see most of these as more similar to "dumb blond" jokes or "racist jokes." They do little to counter negative stereotypes.

 

And defending these self-deprecating attempts at literary humor as "just jokes" seems pretty much as irritating as those who defend racist and sexist jokes as "just jokes."

 

"Can't you take a joke?"

 

Not always.

 

As book lovers, of course, self-deprecating humor of this sort is easy to accept and even find amusing. And, perhaps that is a significant difference between we who are bibliophiles and our students who have not yet discovered adequate reasons to makee a committment to life-long reading.

 

What percentage of your students would find these "jokes" to be encouraging a love of reading? 

 

My guess is a higher percentage would be encouraged to ridicule their classmates who do like reading.

 

 

 ~ http://GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 

 

Rescooped by Mercy González from Technology in Education
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iTeach: The best 1:1 device is good teaching

iTeach: The best 1:1 device is good teaching | Reading Enrichment And Development | Scoop.it

The best device a school can roll out is a teacher who can adapt to new and emerging technologies, does not always require formal training for learning and staying current, and is not tethered to a product in order to teach.


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Sue Osborne's curator insight, May 26, 2013 10:19 PM

Yes yes yes!  Why do many teacher-librarians persist in demanding that their PD always take place during school hours? If you want to develop YOURSELF professionally, shouldn't you be taking every opportunity you can afford? If you can read a tabloid in your own time, you can find time to read a professional journal too - simple things can make a huge difference! Manage your own professional development, don't expect your school or your union to do it for you! Good teachers and librarians are learning all the time, and sharing their learning - with colleagues and with students.

Sue Osborne's comment, May 26, 2013 10:23 PM
I love the comments about professional development not always being done in school hours. If it's worth doing, it's worth doing. Period.
Tamra Dollar's curator insight, July 19, 2013 11:09 AM

Teachers are the rock stars in the class room...but great rock stars need instruments to create music.

Rescooped by Mercy González from Dyslexia, Dyspraxia, ADD, ADHD, LD, Autism (etc. conspiracy labels out there) Education Tools & Info
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Free and Open Source Dyslexia Typeface

Free and Open Source Dyslexia Typeface | Reading Enrichment And Development | Scoop.it

 

OpenDyslexic is a new open sourced font created to increase readability for readers with dyslexia. The typeface includes regular, bold, italic, and bold-italic styles. It is being updated continually and improved based on input from dyslexic users. There are no restrictions on using OpenDyslexic outside of attribution.


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BYOD School Tells Students, "Buy a Calculator Because You Can Cheat with Your iPads!"

BYOD School Tells Students, "Buy a Calculator Because You Can Cheat with Your iPads!" | Reading Enrichment And Development | Scoop.it

Can you believe this? 

 

My daughter goes to a 20th century school that mistakingly thinks it embraces 21st century learning simply because it allows students to bring their own device. This is particularly frustrating to me since I speak on this very subject at schools and conferences around the country. 

 

"Daddy, I need to buy a scientific calculator for math class!" I respond, "Oh sweetie, you're so cute. No one with a brand new iPad mini needs to buy a physical calculator any more. Just tell me what functions you need it to do and I'll help you find the right app." To which she says, "No. We're not allowed to use our iPads or phones. The teacher says we can cheat that way by texting, IMing, or emailing answers to each other." *facepalm*

 

I would like to crowdsource here and ask for comments as to how to best deliver my email to this school's academic director.

 

Thanks in advance!


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Jo Blannin - Innovative Learning's comment, May 7, 2013 10:56 PM
totally disagree! teach them to source information from wherever - where does 'cheating' actually fit these days? Isn't crowd sourcing your answer a good strategy - just like you're doing?!?!?
Leslie Kelsey's comment, May 10, 2013 11:01 AM
The teacher could think about creating an assignment that involves much more than crunching numbers, and requires analysis, hypothesis proposal and other key scientific research skills that make using a Sci Calculator out of date - the whole notion of cheating is outdated.
Casey Anley's curator insight, July 6, 2013 1:32 PM

Bizarre rationality after adopting a poilcy!

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Kevin Honeycutt, "Our kids will spend the rest of their lives in the future. Are we getting them ready?"

Our kids will spend the rest of their lives in the future Are we getting them ready? Kevin Honeycutt (@kevinhoneycutt) - Hutchinson, Kansas

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Camela Giraud's curator insight, April 26, 2013 5:20 AM

Fantastic video about our opportunity and responsibility in the technology age. Love it. 

CERT's comment, May 8, 2013 4:12 AM
"What are our kids doing now that they couldn't do before?" We think that this is really the main focus that we should attach to technology and what we need to implement in our schools.
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Dyslexia: How to successfully teach a dyslexic child to read

Dyslexia: How to successfully teach a dyslexic child to read | Reading Enrichment And Development | Scoop.it
Learning to read for a dyslexic child is like learning to ride a bike hands free. The key to successfully teach a dyslexic child to read is balance.
There are r

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Rescooped by Mercy González from readwritethink
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ProfessorWord: Improve your vocabulary while you surf the web

ProfessorWord: Improve your vocabulary while you surf the web | Reading Enrichment And Development | Scoop.it

Professor Word is a useful browser plugin to help you develop your vocabulary. It enables you to click on words in a text on any webpage and get a definition. It also shows related words. Good tool for vocabulary building.

 


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Maria Pia Montoro's comment, October 15, 2012 6:09 AM
contact the developers!
Maria Valdes's comment, October 15, 2012 7:11 AM
It does work with Mac, I've just checked. It might be a problem of the browser, not the app.
Maria Pia Montoro's comment, October 15, 2012 7:21 AM
it works fine for me as well!
Rescooped by Mercy González from Getting Appy with the Common Core
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Common Core

Common Core | Reading Enrichment And Development | Scoop.it
Kathleen Benedick está usando Pinterest, un tablero en línea que te permite recopilar y compartir las cosas que te inspiran.

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Rescooped by Mercy González from Student Writing Resources
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Story Starters: Creative Writing Prompts for Kids | Scholastic.com

Scholastic's Story Starters kids' writing activity generates creative writing prompts, from general fiction to adventure, fantasy, and science fiction.

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jamie camp's curator insight, July 4, 2013 11:22 AM

Story starters!

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Personal Learning Networks | Education in America

Personal Learning Networks | Education in America | Reading Enrichment And Development | Scoop.it
Personal learning networks (PLNs) are a reciprocal learning system that educators can create to learn from, connect with, gather resources and information, and share what they have learned.

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Jennie Snyder, Ed.D.'s curator insight, July 12, 2013 1:15 PM

What personal learning networks are and how you can benefit from creating one...

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Popplet

Popplet | Reading Enrichment And Development | Scoop.it

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Rescooped by Mercy González from Getting Appy with the Common Core
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Four Ways to Use an iPad to Help Us Meet the Common Core State S...

Choose/use apps that personalize learning, reveal student thinking, bridge connections, and create a sense of belonging

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Rescooped by Mercy González from Technology in Education
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5 Myths About Writing With Mobile Devices - Edudemic

5 Myths About Writing With Mobile Devices - Edudemic | Reading Enrichment And Development | Scoop.it
There are some big myths about writing with mobile devices. But are they actually true? The EdTechTeacher team weighs in on a controversial topic.

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Danielle M. Villegas's curator insight, May 22, 2013 9:28 AM

This article comes by way of @felixjacomino on ScoopIt. I really like this article, because it's main point is that people are trying to adapt old ways of writing to new technology. I believe the author, at some point, even points out that in education, it doesn't matter what software package a child learns as long as they learn technology and the basics of how to use word processing. I started out on WordPerfect years ago, and then had to adapt to Word 1.0 (what version are we up to now?). Same with CMS systems that I've learned in the past. People are always so stuck on knowing specific products in tech comm instead of realizing that if you know one software package, you can probably adapt fairly quickly to a new one if you are just shown the differences. That was definitely the case with my current position. 

 

But back to iPads and writing--I took copious notes on my iPad during the STC Summit, and wrote several long blog posts on my iPad as well. Yes, it was easier to type with a wireless keyboard, but that's only because I type very fast and legibility is important to me. It's a sensory thing for me.  I found that for basic writing tasks, I can use the iPad with ease, and that's the point of this article. No more excuses! Mobile is definitely an option. 

--techcommgeekmom

Richard Seal's curator insight, May 23, 2013 7:31 AM

I have found it quite difficult doing long term typing on my iPad. Very interesting. 

Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, July 2, 2013 8:52 PM

Review this article and provide your perspective.

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Why Should You Read Today? {100+ Reasons...} - Learning Unlimited

Why Should You Read Today? {100+ Reasons...} - Learning Unlimited | Reading Enrichment And Development | Scoop.it

'Independent reading sometimes gets a bad rap. Not enough time. Not enough books. Not enough accountability. Not enough evidence. You get the picture.'


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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, May 27, 2013 2:32 PM

An intriguing list. 

 

Now, what might we do with the list? One of my favorite learning experience design strategies is to construct a three part experience.

 

And by the way, though it takes a bit of time to explain the following, it actually doesn't take long to do the following. For example the multiple steps in the first part might not take more than 10 minutes all together.

 

The FIRST PART consists of a short individual experience designed to give each student a little time to contemplate a personal relationship with a topic. It's pretty freeing because it allows students to recognize that there are sometimes many right answers. And, that what might be a right answer for some may not be a right answer for others. AND THAT SOMETIMES THIS IS PERFECTLY OKAY.

 

In this case, I might type up this list in a form that removes any indication of some reasons for reading might be better than others. So, I'd lose the bold type that implies such a judgment.

 

I'd preset the removal of judgment by prefacing the experience with some sort of statement like, "You know when I was a kid I really liked reading stories about imaginary places like OZ in the Wizard of OZ. But, my best friend preferred stories about faraway real places. That's one of the neat things about reading. There's something for everyone."

 

Then I'd invite the students to a challenge to find out what they like about reading. I'd give them the list [OR A VERSION OF THE LIST ADAPTED TO FIT THE STUDENTS' AGE]  and say, "Here's a list of many reasons that people say are reasons they like to read. What I'd like each of you to do is read the list and circle any of the reasons that are reasons that you like to read. Don't worry. Some of you will have many reasons circled. Some of you will have fewer reasons. And, my guess is that no one will have circled ALL the exact same words with no differences. 

 

Then I'd give them just a few minutes to circle the reasons that they liked the best. I'd encourage them to circle as many reasons as they could find  that matched the reasons they like about reading but not too worry too much about the exact number they circle. Just try to make sure you don't "miss any reasons" that they do like.

 

Then I'd casually tell them that I'd like to try an experiment that doesn't make any sense at all. I'd say, "What if there was a law that said you could only have 3 reasons for liking to read? That you could pick any three reasons you wanted from the reasons you circled, but you HAD TO cross out all the reasons you circled EXCEPT the three you'd keep? And then I'd say, "Of course this would be a silly law, but what if...? What three would you keep?"

 

Then I'd ask each to turn the paper over and divide it into 3 columns and to label each of the columns with one of their personal favorite reasons for liking to read.

 

In the columns I'd invite them to try to think of one or two or three stories that are good examples of stories they've enjoyed for the reason they wrote at the top of each column. (Be sure to let them know that some stories might appear only in one column and other stories might appear in more than one column)

 

 

All of this is designed to have them :

1.FEEL LIKE THEIR PERSONAL LIKES ARE RESPECTED

(All answers are right answers for liking to read, but everyone has permission to have a different set of right answers)

2. THINK ABOUT HOW IMPORTANT THE VARIOUS PERSONAL RIGHT ANSWERS ARE TOO THEM (Some of their personal "right answers" are "especially right answers for them)

3. SPEND JUST A BIT MORE TIME THINKING ABOUT MATCHING THEIR OWN FAVORITE STORIES TO THEIR PERSONAL RIGHT ANSWERS FOR LIKING READING.

 

And this creates a 'ready-set' for SECOND PART of the design which involves small group discussions. A "ready-set" is when students come to small group discussion having done a bit of pre-group contemplation; sort of like warming up in the on deck circle in a baseball game just prior to going up to bat. 

 

In the SECOND PART students are put into small groups. I'm a fan of groups of three and sometimes four; large enough to have a variety of input possibilities but small enough to preclude group members from "just letting everyone else do the talking."

 

Once kids are sitting in circles ready to begin, I explain the following rules.

 

1. The conversations should be limited to sharing the many reasons why people like reading AND the titles of books that they enjoyed reading. BUT, the conversation shouldn't drift off into disagreements about whether one reason for liking reading wasn't a good reason or a conversations about why someone's favorite story "wasn't a good book."

2. Students are welcome to ADD TITLES to their list if someone mentions a favorite book they had forgotten to put on their own list or a book they had not read but might want to take a look at since it was someone else's favorite book for one of their own favorite reasons.

3. And, finally students are also free to forget about the limitation of only three reasons for liking to read. So, if the conversation intrigues them they are now free to add new reason columns and new titles.

 

Then the students simply take turns going around the group sharing a connection between any one favorite book and the reason they put that title in one of their columns. They continue going around the circle as many times as they like or as many times as they can in a time span set by the teacher.

 

Generally speaking, the members of the group will find some commonalities as each share..

 

Perhaps a book they've enjoyed was mentioned by somebody else. But each put that same book under a different reason for liking it. Or perhaps one student mentions a book that another had not read but the first person put that book under a reason for liking it that connects with another student's top reasons for liking to read.  Or perhaps a favorite book is mentioned and connected to a reason that another person didn't consider a reason why some people liked the book.

 

Students might discover "new titles" that fit their favorite reasons for reading. They might discover new reasons to be open to reading new titles and/or new titles to read for their favorite reasons to read.

 

PART THREE is optional. And there are a vast array of options that might be of value.

 

Perhaps students could collect "data" from all groups to find out the class's top "X" number of reasons for liking to read.

Perhaps students could collect "data" from all groups to find out the class's  top "X" number of favorite stories

Perhaps the students could blend the previous two data sets into a wall chart with the class's ~"top 10" reasons to like reading and the top 10 titles listed under each reason.

This chart could be the source of monthly reading groups designed around common interests. 

 

Just some thoughts... I'm sure there are a thousand ways to use this list to give ownership of designed independent reading to the students while encouraging them to explore beyond what they might choose on their own.

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

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Visual Processing Disorders | Learning Disability - NCLD

Visual Processing Disorders | Learning Disability - NCLD | Reading Enrichment And Development | Scoop.it
Visual processing disorder & disability - There are lots of ways the brain processes visual information. Weaknesses in a particular kind of visual processing can often be seen in specific difficulties.

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Temple Grandin: The world needs all kinds of minds

Temple Grandin, diagnosed with autism as a child, talks about how her mind works -- sharing her ability to "think in pictures," which helps her solve problems that neurotypical brains might miss. She makes the case that the world needs people on the autism spectrum: visual thinkers, pattern thinkers, verbal thinkers, and all kinds of smart geeky kids.

 

 


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Melyssa Martinez's curator insight, March 11, 2013 1:42 PM

I really enjoyed her speech on autistic children of all ages. How we are able to understand their thinking in images and how delopmental ways they see things ;It is absoultely brilliant and insightful. We all have to realize naturally every child is diffrent under their spectrum and is unique in their own personality ....:)

The Bridge Movement's curator insight, January 25, 10:44 PM

Loved her books, and i value her insights #autism... @templeGrandin

April Sprecher's curator insight, July 28, 8:50 PM

This is a 20 minute video of Temple Grandin speaking. Interesting to hear the perspective of an adult with autism. 

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12 Ways To Integrate (Not Just Use) Technology In Education

12 Ways To Integrate (Not Just Use) Technology In Education | Reading Enrichment And Development | Scoop.it
If you run a classroom, school, district, or country, you need to know how to properly integrate technology in education. This should help.

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Elsa Mansfield's curator insight, May 16, 2013 6:21 PM

Being purposeful about incorporating technology in our learning tasks will be vital to being an effective teacher. Students need to be taught how to use these tools and navigate the volume of information the internet presents. Using technology without direction and purpose can create problems and wastes tremendous potential.

it442's curator insight, May 16, 2013 10:04 PM

Elsa Mansfield-This article talks about using technology to learn instead of learning how to use technology. Integration involves making technology a part of the everyday classroom, and using it to engage studetns with information or content. I like the idea of being very purposeful with employing technology in a variety of ways and incorporating technology in our learning tasks constantly.  Using technology without direction and purpose can create problems and wastes tremendous potential.

Courtney Abels's curator insight, July 2, 2013 12:12 PM

I'm going to be busy!

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5 Keys to Snagging Reluctant Readers

5 Keys to Snagging Reluctant Readers | Reading Enrichment And Development | Scoop.it

YA author and teacher, Ashley Hope Perez, shares her tips about "unlocking the reader within reluctant teens".
Shelf Consumed blog also includes a link to "Books teens may enjoy".


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Mobile Movie Making - Tony Vincent, Learning in Hand - Learning Without Frontiers

Tony Vincent, teacher and learning consultant presents practical and entertaining ways for young learners to use low cost mobile devices to create movies. Pr...

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Maria Juste's curator insight, April 30, 2013 9:19 AM

haz una película con el móvil!

Laia Canadell's comment, April 30, 2013 3:38 PM
Como avanza la tecnologia.