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Literature-Map - The tourist map of literature

Literature-Map - The tourist map of literature | reading | Scoop.it
Travel the world of Literature.

What else do readers of Joel Lehtonen read?

The closer two writers are, the more likely someone will like both of them.


Via Jukka Melaranta
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Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, July 23, 2013 12:59 AM

Muutamia suomenkielisiä kirjailijoita on mukana.

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What We're Reading: Summer Edition, Volume III : The New Yorker

What We're Reading: Summer Edition, Volume III : The New Yorker | reading | Scoop.it
Philip Gourevitch and Judith Thurman on their summer reading plans.
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History’s 100 Geniuses of Language and Literature, Visualized

History’s 100 Geniuses of Language and Literature, Visualized | reading | Scoop.it

What, exactly, is genius? In their latest project, Italian visualization wizard Giorgia Lupi and her team at Accurat — who have previously given us a timeline of the future based on famous fiction, a visual history of the Nobel Prize, and a visualization of global brain drain inspired by Mondrian — explore the anatomy of genius, based on Genius: A Mosaic of One Hundred Exemplary Creative Minds by literary titan Harold Bloom.


From Shakespeare to Stendhal to Lewis Carroll to Ralph Ellison, the visualization depicts the geographic origin, time period, and field of each “genius,” correlated with visits to the respective Wikipedia page and connection to related historical figures.


Via Lauren Moss
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RainboWillis's curator insight, June 4, 2013 8:54 PM

Condensed, and a little bit of a rabbit hole. 

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What Do We Mean by 'Reading' Maps?

What Do We Mean by 'Reading' Maps? | reading | Scoop.it
The common-core standards present an ambiguous message on how to draw information from maps and charts, Phil Gersmehl says.

Via Seth Dixon
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mufidmmn's comment, July 24, 2013 4:08 AM
ngapain itu ya
Taryn Coxall's curator insight, August 5, 2013 9:38 PM

This is a resource i feel would be relevant to those students who struggle to be egaged in their reading

This can be used on readers on many different level

the reading maps foccus on language arts, Its description is communicated through charts, graphs, and maps intead of normal paragraphs and text

Shelby Porter's comment, September 30, 2013 11:19 AM
I feel the skill of reading a map is very important, but it becoming less prevalent in classrooms. Teachers may find it more difficult to teach and therefore are not going in depth with it. I remember as a child in grade school we would color maps or have to find where the states are. We never were taught how to fully understand the uses of a map and all the different ways they are used and how to read them. It is becoming a lost skill in a world that needs to be more appreciative of geography.
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How to Promote Literacy and Skilled Communication

How to Promote Literacy and Skilled Communication | reading | Scoop.it
You may or may not agree that English-language usage is deteriorating, but it is clear that many young people are unable to express themselves well in writing according to contemporary standards. How can we develop a ...
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Required Reading (July 21, 2013) - Hyperallergic

Required Reading (July 21, 2013) - Hyperallergic | reading | Scoop.it
This week, Žižek weighs in a global protest, Walker Evans at MoMA, political cartoons, Smithsonian's space problem, Faulkner sues Woody Allen…
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Faulkner conference focuses on black literature - WTVA

Faulkner conference focuses on black literature - WTVA | reading | Scoop.it
Faulkner conference focuses on black literature
WTVA
"This is an opportunity to see how William Faulkner's work has influenced and continues to shape discussions of African-American literature," said Kenneth Warren, distinguished professor.
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Glenda's Assistive Tech Information & more: Reading with Older Students

Glenda's Assistive Tech Information & more: Reading with Older Students | reading | Scoop.it

"Do you read aloud to your students? Is there ever a time when students are too old to be read to? Many teachers are firm believers in reading aloud -- even at the upper grade levels."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 21, 2013 11:57 PM

This post describes why it is valuable to read to older students as well as a wide variety of resources. There are many reasons to continue to read to older students (and not just those students whom have access to assistive technology). A few of those reasons are below.

* "Reading aloud to children helps them develop and improve literacy skills -- reading, writing, speaking, and listening..."

* "...children listen on a higher level than they read, listening to other readers stimulates growth and understanding of vocabulary and language patterns."

Resources are available in two categories:

* Beyond Instruction that includes a link to a post of Audio books and publications, Information on optical character recognition,Text-to-speech and Variable speed tape recorders

Sites to explore includes links to about 10 websites. Some are free and some will cost.

Adrianna Castelo's curator insight, February 19, 2014 11:13 PM

I thought that this was quite interesting because you never early think to read to students as they get older. It has always been pretty routine that when you learn how to read you do it yourself.For myself, having something read out loud to me is not the best. I never pay attention when it's being read aloud only when I read it for myself. However, it could be beneficial to other students who really do have learning disabilities without them knowing. 

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From Harry Potter to Twilight: Gothic literature in the 21st Century ...

From Harry Potter to Twilight: Gothic literature in the 21st Century ... | reading | Scoop.it
This century has seen an ongoing trend for 'Gothic' books and films aimed at teenagers, from the Harry Potter and Twilight films to the recently-announced play Let the Right One In at the Royal Court Theatre.
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Hysterical Literature: Session Two: Alicia (Official)

Support literature, purchase the book: http://amzn.to/ND6MV3 Alicia visits the studio and reads from "Leaves of Grass" by Walt Whitman. Directed by Clayton C...
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Placing Literature maps book scenes in the real world

Placing Literature maps book scenes in the real world | reading | Scoop.it

"Placing Literature maps book scenes in the real world."


Via Seth Dixon
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Yael BOUBLIL's curator insight, June 29, 2013 5:18 AM

Une piste intéressante...

MelissaRossman's curator insight, August 30, 2013 10:48 AM

wonderful

 

MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 10:48 AM
wonderful
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The Lincoln of Literature: Mark Twain, The Atlantic, and the Making of the Middlebrow Magazine

The Lincoln of Literature: Mark Twain, The Atlantic, and the Making of the Middlebrow Magazine | reading | Scoop.it
How Twain entered the literary elite and purged literature of elitism.
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Teaching Reading in the Digital Age

Teaching Reading in the Digital Age | reading | Scoop.it
What does it really mean to teach reading in a digital age? It means teaching both ways and also in new ways. It means going back to school and learning to read along with our students, in a world ...

Via Mel Riddile
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Lauren's curator insight, July 30, 2013 11:24 AM

Great thoughts for reading teachers 

Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, August 7, 2013 2:29 PM

Earlier this summer, following a deep dive into the paradigm shifting models of design thinking and gamification in education at the annual conference of the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE 2013), I found myself settling in to a week-long study of the time-tested, best-practices pedagogy at the Reading and Writing Institutes at Teachers College, Columbia University. It felt a bit like inhabiting one portion of my brain and then taking up residence in an entirely different thinking space – both equally valid to my professional life. Searching for a way to reconcile my learning, I am left wondering most about what it means to be a reader today.

Common Ground

The educational visionaries at ISTE, who call for creating a radically different learning environment for today’s self-directed learners, can find surprising common ground with some of the basic tenets of the Lucy Calkins approach to teaching reading (at least as I understand it as a first-year attendee of the Reading Institute).

For both, student choice remains central to learning, whether students are choosing the books they want to read from a classroom library or researching how to modify classroom furniture for a project employing design theory.Another crossover, the role of the teacher as coach who provides mini-lessons on learning strategies, might succeed as easily with a teacher seated at a chart and easel as with the digital-age teacher who uses short flipped lessons to deliver directed instruction.Innovators who tout the merits of gaming as a way to fire up students about their learning, for — ISTE keynoter Jane McGonigal, for instance — surely must recognize how the storytelling narrative sparks engagement in a gaming environment; likewise, the Reading Workshop method employs “leveling up” strategies familiar to gamers to move students through “leveled” classroom libraries that present offer more challenges and require greater sophistication as a students gain mastery of reading skills.

Digital Readers Reading

What, then, does this mean for those of us who teaching readers today? I am still searching for answers to questions that won’t let go of me.

The Reading Institute puts a lot of emphasis on “eyes on print” time – that is, on classroom time given over to readers engaged in the act of reading. This requires creating a culture of readers with books in their hands and sticky notes at the ready for jotting questions and tracking observations (leading to critical thinking). As a teacher who recognizes that students read in digital contexts as well, I find myself wondering if “eyes on text” (eyes on media?) might be a better term. Or is it even the same thing?  My students are constantly reading as oodles of different kinds of text-based media cross their paths. Don’t we need to prepare them with the nuanced skills required to read in every way possible?My students who use tablets or e-readers for reading time love the easy access to digital dictionaries. This frees them to engage with their reading even more deeply. Are they absorbing vocabulary more thoroughly and accurately than the students who are too lazy or too engrossed to open a dictionary? Digital readers do not necessarily preclude commenting on texts. Students with e-readers can certainly annotate their reading with digital comments. Is this any different from the kind of critical questioning students do with pen in hand?My goal is to teach my students to develop a passion for reading, but I also want them to use any effective means that can help them go beyond the surface in their reading. I also recognize the value in sharing their ideas with others. Is there something magical about the handwritten (and easily sharable) sticky note comment favored by the Reading Institute, or can my students do just as well (better?) with a sticky note app like Popplet?The Reading Institute went to great pains to introduce lessons about the reading of nonfiction, acknowledging a new pedagogical emphasis on nonfiction in the Common Core. As a result, considerable (though not exclusive) attention at the Institute was given over to using historical fiction in classroom libraries and as “anchor texts” for mini-lessons. I want to go further. I would venture that most students don’t know enough about the variety of nonfiction forms to know the difference between what is basically made up (fiction) or basically true (nonfiction) – in my experience, they tend to see everything they read in terms of story. Students need to be able to read an article online and identify it as a blog or a news story or a reference source. They need to recognize rhetorical strategies like comparison or illustration and understand how they affect a reader. As my section leader at the Reading Institute stated, students need to question perspective and bias in every kind of writing. I wonder, are we really doing enough to address these skills in our classes?Reading also represents an intersection of design, image, and text. The picture book, at its best, uses each avenue of communication to the fullest. So I am excited to follow the Reading Workshop method and return to picture books and image-rich texts (online or otherwise) as a means of teaching reading skills. I also like how the Reading Institute breaks down the skills needed to deconstruct a page and address the increasing complexity of the relationship of image to text, as this builds from mere illustration to direct contradiction. How can teachers of reading in a digital context build upon this work? At the same time, how might we all step back and consider more thoroughly the elements of design and their relationship to meaning?Reading for pure pleasure is certainly something we still want to nurture – whether the children we teach are “trapped” by an engaging story (as one of my rising sixth-graders put it on a recent discussion board about his summer reading) or whether they follow the meandering path of their burgeoning curiosity by skipping from website to website (we used to call this browsing when we did it in libraries or bookstores). Still, what are the ways we can encourage our students to extend their reading – yes, by reading for depth and understanding in a traditional sense, but also by accessing auxiliary information available to us online, by following hyperlinks to make more connections, or by engaging in a rousing backchannel chat?At the same time, we certainly also need to teach students how to handle the distractions of reading in a digital context, just as we help them mediate the distractions of an antsy classmate or a nearby whispered tutorial. How can we do this if we never allow them to read on their own devices and in ways that are second-nature to them?

A New Generation of Readers

After participating in these two very different learning venues, I went off the grid and experienced three delicious days of beach reading. I felt the pull of the stories like the tide, and I gave into where they took me. I want my students to feel that. But since I’ve come home, I’ve caught up on my Twitter feed, read my personal and work emails, and browsed for articles related to the topic of this blog post. This is the kind of reading my students will do – and already do – on a daily basis.

What does it really mean to teach reading in a digital age? It means teaching both ways and also in new ways. It means going back to school and learning to read along with our students, in a world in which we are surrounded by text from which we must derive meaning.

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The number of college students majoring in humanities is falling. Why that's a good thing.

The number of college students majoring in humanities is falling. Why that's a good thing. | reading | Scoop.it
Of course it's important to read the great poets and novelists. But not in a university classroom, where literature has been turned into a bland, soulless competition for grades and status. Lee Siegel on putting the joy back in reading.
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Vintage Ads for Libraries and Reading

Vintage Ads for Libraries and Reading | reading | Scoop.it
"There's a future in books…and a book in your future!"

After yesterday's vintage ads for iconic books, how about some vintage ads and p ("Man overbored?
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Teach Informational Texts Alongside The Literature You Love

Teach Informational Texts Alongside The Literature You Love | reading | Scoop.it
The Common Core places new emphasis on the importance of reading and analyzing complex nonfiction and informational texts. This has many English teachers feeling like their literature is under attack, but students fall in love with stories.

Via Mel Riddile
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10 Basic Skills Every Employee Should Have

10 Basic Skills Every Employee Should Have | reading | Scoop.it
Communication, organization, empathy and problem solving to name a few skills every employee needs today. Plus a career development exercise.

Via Don Dea
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Don Dea's curator insight, July 22, 2013 11:39 PM
  1. Communication (written and verbal) – You don’t have to speak professionally or write a book. Employees do need to know basic grammar and sentence construction. And when it doubt, know how to look rules up. The AP Style Guide is your friend. 
  2. Computer – No more hunting and pecking on a keyboard. Companies today expect employees to know how to apply for a job online and take computer-based training. They also expect employees to have introductory word, spreadsheet, and presentation processing skills.