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Listening, Literacy and the Common Core: How Audio Books Improve Reading Ability

Listening, Literacy and the Common Core: How Audio Books Improve Reading Ability | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
SPONSORED BY: Tales2Go and School Library Journal
EVENT DATE AND TIME: Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013, 3:00 – 4:00 PM ET/12:00 – 1:00 PM PT
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Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
Monique Reyna's insight:

This can also be great for children with vision impairments. 

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Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby's curator insight, November 15, 2013 9:06 AM

If you're interested in making a case for audio books in your library media center, this looks like a worthy webinar to access.

Fantasy Reading World
Engage your children in reading as you help them develop their vocabulary skills.
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Twitter / WildcatsLibrary: Listening to the Reading Fairy ...

Twitter / WildcatsLibrary: Listening to the Reading Fairy ... | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
RT @WildcatsLibrary: Listening to the Reading Fairy at Lit Night http://t.co/zjnv6K0UXK
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This is perfect for keeping the younger children engaged throughout the entire story. 

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Rescooped by Monique Reyna from K-12 School Libraries
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Listening, Literacy and the Common Core: How Audio Books Improve Reading Ability

Listening, Literacy and the Common Core: How Audio Books Improve Reading Ability | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
SPONSORED BY: Tales2Go and School Library Journal
EVENT DATE AND TIME: Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013, 3:00 – 4:00 PM ET/12:00 – 1:00 PM PT
Register now!

Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
Monique Reyna's insight:

This can also be great for children with vision impairments. 

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Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby's curator insight, November 15, 2013 9:06 AM

If you're interested in making a case for audio books in your library media center, this looks like a worthy webinar to access.

Rescooped by Monique Reyna from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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Neuroscientist speaks about literacy's effect on human brain

Neuroscientist speaks about literacy's effect on human brain | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
In the human brain, there is a battle taking place between words and faces.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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Very interesting read for teachers and parents. 

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, November 15, 2013 2:53 PM

What an intriguing concept. I've always considered the benefit of literacy to be in the wide array of areas where text informs.  That is true of course, however it never occurred  to me that the benefits of literacy could be distinguished in the area of visual recognition. 

 

A teaser quote from this brief article...

 

_____________

Being able to read, according to Dehaene’s research, offers literate people better ability to analyze the things they see and have learned a visual flexibility that illiterate people do not have.

_____________

 An intriguing brief read.  ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name for GLT Global Ed, an educational nonprofit.
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Reading, Walking and More Reading for Writer - New York Times

Reading, Walking and More Reading for Writer - New York Times | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
New York Times Reading, Walking and More Reading for Writer New York Times If you are an attentive walker in New York City, any block might open up to you as a story: about the immigrants who once lived there, about the forces that moved them,...
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Kan. governor seeks 'synergies' to boost reading - San Francisco Chronicle

Kan. governor seeks 'synergies' to boost reading - San Francisco Chronicle | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
Kansas.com
Kan. governor seeks 'synergies' to boost reading San Francisco Chronicle Sam Brownback is hoping to connect Kansas schools with other organizations to improve student reading proficiency, following a model he introduced in 2011 to boost...
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Our View: Focus on reading, not just retention - Santa Fe New Mexican.com

Our View: Focus on reading, not just retention - Santa Fe New Mexican.com | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
Our View: Focus on reading, not just retention Santa Fe New Mexican.com With her Department of Public Education Secretary-designate Hanna Skandera, Martinez has been pushing education reforms based on policies tried in Florida — and the drive to...
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Oklahoma elementary schoolchildren converge on Capitol for reading program - NewsOK.com

Oklahoma elementary schoolchildren converge on Capitol for reading program - NewsOK.com | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
Oklahoma elementary schoolchildren converge on Capitol for reading program NewsOK.com More than 2,000 elementary school students from across Oklahoma converged on the Capitol Friday to participate in ReadOK, a reading event sponsored by the state...
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I LOVE this. It's the perfect idea to incorporate in low-income or title one schools. 

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Honey, I Killed the Kids' Love of Reading

Honey, I Killed the Kids' Love of Reading | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
Not that into reading? Keep trying! Stop labeling our kids, and instead start figuring out what they love, what interests them... and make reading the vehicle to learn more about it.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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As parents we want to get our children to read, but often forget how easy it is to discourage them. This gives you 5 great tips to get your child excited to read. 

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, November 17, 2013 10:26 AM

I've often railed against the idea that complex problems have simple solutions, finding most often that supporters of any "supposedly simple solutions" are generally ill-informed and simplistic, focusing on such a narrow segment of the problem that they fail to consider the ramifications of their narrow focus upon the entirety of the problem. 

 

However, this article offers some fairly simple, yet remarkably reliable advise regarding well-intended actions that quite often have counter-intended outcomes.

 

Among the points made in the article, I particularly appreciated the idea of getting rid of labels when they refer to areas of learning that are perceived to be strengths in comparison to areas of learning that are perceived to be weaknesses. How early do children begin to accept the idea that they might not be particularly good (or interested) in reading? And what are the seeds of this perception? Sometimes, often I would suggest, the seeds are sown when children's early interests in one area generate positive encouragement and their lesser interest in orther areas  becomes a nervous concern in parents who worry that child "A" is not as good as child "B" in the later area but has strengths elsewhere. This concept of specialized strengths in one area having anything to do with perceived weaknesses in other areas is a false assumption. But, in voicing the belief whether it is an attempt to make the child feel okay about not being good in "reading" because she is good in math sets up a false understanding of the child that is accepted by the child as being true and okay. Or, it sets up a sort of parental sense that what the child needs is to be force-fed reading like castor oil of olden times was believed to be a panacea of sorts in spite of its repulsive gag-causing taste.

 

Force-feeding reading, particularly in areas of little to no pre-existing interest may well speed up the process of developing a resentment or resistance to reading.

 

So, the trick is how does one encourage the deveopment of a latent potential for the non-reader to embrace reading?

 

Engage them early is certainly the most effective preventative for a negative trajectory in the area of  reading. Lots of reading to and with children is pretty well time-tested. Reading aloud engages the eyes and the ears and the imagination in much the same way that watching movies does. It's a multi-sensory experience that is generally enjoyed frequently PRIOR to the development of the desire to be able to read for oneself. It is the enjoyment and engagement that provides the motivation to develop a readiness for the process of learning to decode text. 

 

It is the pre-established engagement, interest, enjoyment, and/or perception of personal value and relevance that provides the impetus for taking the next step in literacy skill development and later for taking the next step in literary reading appreciation.

 

 

 

As children begin their formal educations they very quickly perceive their "place" in comparison to other children's "place" in the constant measure of established skill levels and progress achievement in reading (and, of course in other areas including math and art). And, as the challenges grow, they often begin to accept their place as fixed. Sometimes this fixer perception is enhanced by the fact that their skills levels are often on display to their friends and classmates. Whether formalized or de facto, grouping is a public display of one's "shortcomings" that is often perceived as humiliating rather than recognized as an attempt to provide individualized attention. 

 

Be a fly on the wall in a high school classroom where a Shakespeare play is introduced by a well-intended teacher who assigns roles to be read aloud believing that student engagement via participatory reading aloud is engaging for better readers and "good practice" for the less skilled readers. It can be agonizing for the less confident readers as they display their difficulties in decoding publicly as they stumble through sounding out unfamiliar vocabulary and unfamilar sentence structures. And, cold reading aloud even by the best readers is often dreadful as they are challenged to find the sense of complex sentence structures while reading them aloud for the first time.

 

I happened to have been a pretty good reader very early on. My family had a subscription to National Geographic. My dad subscribed to Popular Mechanics and my mom subscribed to Sunset Magazine and with the exception of Mad Magazine, they let me subscribe to one comic book of my own choice. Fortunately, my best buddy's parents were okay with his subscription to Mad Magazine so I was able to discover the wonders of humor on the edge while having been motivated by Mad Magazine's reputation among adults as being inappropriate reading.

 

I read what I had to read voraciously, sometimes sereptiously as was the case when I "borrowed" a copy of Mad Magazine, And almost always I read what I read over and over. 

 

(I recognize that I am about to drift into a contemplative digression. But, I'll take the Holden Caulfield defense of digression: Chapter 24 if you're interested)

 

Yet, when called upon to read aloud in class, in spite of my very good decoding skills, my entire attention was devoted to delivering a perfect reading to impress my teachers. I was frequently patted on the head for my reading abilities. Ironically, I'd always perform well in spite of the fact that between showing off my decoding skills and caring deeply about my public performance in front of my classmates, I almost never had sufficient attention left to also attend deeply to the content of what I was reading aloud. At home I was generally reading privately and my attention was always on what I was reading. At school when reading publicly my attention was consumed by how well I was decoding.

 

I found myself sitting in a different seat however when it came to grammar skills. I do not know the source of my failure to become engaged in learning grammar. My parents spoke well enough. I spoke well enough. I didn't use "ain't" by default. Though there was something cool about using it intentionally on the playground. 

 

But, I'll be darned if I ever found a reason to care about dangling participles, gerunds, and conjunctive adverbs. And, sentence diagramming? Well, I just thought, falsely I realize, that there couldn't possibly be any reason why I should care about turning sentences into goofball "whatever" those things were that we were expected to turn sentences into.

 

So, in the case of the expected public displays of our ability to diagram sentences, my attentiveness while dreading the possibility of getting called on was not on improving my skills by learning from those whose public performances were excellent, but rather upon nothing outside of the anxiety I was feeling about the fact that sooner or later I knew I would be called upon to demonstrate my shortcomings publicly. Of course, I should have taken that anxiety as a motivation for paying more attention. But, I didn't.  I became obsessed with trying to figure out the pattern that the teacher might use to determine who would be called upon next. Having a last name that started with a "B" I frequently found myself sitting somewhere in the first row (as in column, not as in spreadsheets). Frequently that meant I would be called upon maybe fourth. Three students would go public before me, while I marinated in the knowledge that my public performance was definitely going to happen. All consuming dread and fear of failure dominated my entire attentiveness.

 

That must be somehow parallel to the feelings of my classmates whose decoding skills were such that they dreaded the fact that they knew that sooner or later they would be called upon to perform publicly.

 

Logically, students should recognize their skill shortcomings and address them logically. But, in reality, even as adults, fear and anxiety and dread can easily dominate our ability to apply a "Spock-like logic" to our abilities to counter intense fears, anxieties, and dreads.

 

And then we begin to counter-compensate with illogical reasoning. "I'm just not good at _________." 

"I hate __________."

"People who like _________ are (dorks, nerds, momma's boys, _______s, etc.)

"Who wants to be friends with________, all my friends hate _______ too?"

 

Or, we begin to develop other skills such as...

Sitting in the back of the room hoping to be less noticable or avoiding eye contact,  or pretending to be looking for a pen in our backpacks, when the teacher is scanning for the next student to call on.

 

The "smarter" of us learn quickly to adopt a pose that signals that we care about what we don't care about rather than misbehave and expose the level of our lack of caring about what we are supposed to care about.. 

 

So where in the article did I find the hook that eventually lead to this digression?

 

It was the third point. Follow Their Interests. If they don't care, what do they care about. Then bait the trap by allowing them to read about something they already have a vested interest in. And, give them something to read on that interest that gives them  experiences of reading "more about it" positioning reading as a perceived way to learn more than they do about something they care about. 

 

This is not to say that we should drop required reading in favor of self-selected reading. But we should know what sort of existing bridges there are or can be built from their existing interests to the required readings. And, we should allow for as much opportunity for choice as we can whenever we can in the area of what students get credit for reading.

 

Okay, you can read the article and take from it what you will. For me, the simple take home is it makes sense to build upon what they are interested in. Reading, particularly literary reading, should be enjoyed and/or engaging. It is the action, the humor, the tension, the need to keep reading to see whether or not the good will triumph, or the next page will provide more funny stuff, or whether the story is just plain captivating for whatever reasons we become captivated in stories, And, if it is, or if we can sell that "captivation" then we can exploit that engagement as a gateway to raising the higher level themes or perhaps delving into the deeper level themes that were behind the decision to include the stories we assign in our classrooms in the first place..

 

 

  ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit.

 

 

 

 

 

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Free Printable Reading Log to Inspire a Love of Reading - My Kids Guide

Free Printable Reading Log to Inspire a Love of Reading - My Kids Guide | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
Encourage your children to read more by logging their books on our cute free printable reading log for kids! It's a simple yet fun way to track progress! (Track your #kids' #reading progress with this #free printable reading log!
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Why Do Some Children Have Difficulty Learning to Read? | ForDyslexia

Why Do Some Children Have Difficulty Learning to Read? | ForDyslexia | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it

Via Tina Marie DeLong
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Top 10 Most Popular Apps for Kids Learning to Read - Awesome Kids Apps

Top 10 Most Popular Apps for Kids Learning to Read - Awesome Kids Apps | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
If your child is learning to read, apps can help! Lots of apps focus on helping kids learn to read - this article shows you ten of our favorites!

Via John Evans
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Ninna Ricci Capistrano's curator insight, September 11, 2014 6:42 AM

It would be educational and fun at the same time

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When Johnny can't read - Modern technology and new approaches help kids ... - Deseret News

When Johnny can't read - Modern technology and new approaches help kids ... - Deseret News | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
Deseret News
When Johnny can't read - Modern technology and new approaches help kids ...
Deseret News
At the beginning of second grade, Nathan's reading skills were stuck at kindergarten level. His halting efforts to ...
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Another great way how technology can help students! 

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Kids First Words With Phonics – A Nice App for Learning to Read and Spell

Kids First Words With Phonics – A Nice App for Learning to Read and Spell | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
Kids First Words With Phonics is a nice iPad app designed to help children learn to read and spell. The app shows students a picture, reads a word to them, then asks the child to drag and drop lett...

Via John Evans
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Lenore Dufton-Johnstone's comment, July 11, 2013 9:37 PM
I think students would really enjoy this
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15 Of The Best Educational Apps For Improved Reading Comprehension

15 Of The Best Educational Apps For Improved Reading Comprehension | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
15 Of The Best Educational Apps For Improved Reading Comprehension (15 Of The Best Educational Apps For Improved Reading Comprehension http://t.co/dr9RzarLvX via @teachthought)...
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Children are growning up in a digital world, this is perfect for downloading the right apps to help them learn not only keep them entertained. 

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States Insist On Third Grade Reading Proficiency - Huffington Post

States Insist On Third Grade Reading Proficiency - Huffington Post | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
States Insist On Third Grade Reading Proficiency Huffington Post Despite progress in some states, only 35 percent of fourth graders across the country are proficient in reading, according to the most recent National Assessment of Educational...
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I Think You Have A Reading Problem

I Think You Have A Reading Problem | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
Click to see the pic and write a comment... (I Think You Have A Reading Problem http://t.co/CRhxZv7Wyh vía @9GAG)
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HAHA! I just think this is so funny. 

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Winter Reads by Women Writers

Winter Reads by Women Writers | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
If you're looking for something to read this winter by a woman author, something that'll engross you, take you to new worlds and introduce you to characters you'll never forget, I have some suggestio (“@edutopia: 6 alltime favorite novels 4 ...
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"Any book that helps a child to form a... - The Modern Teacher | Facebook

"Any book that helps a child to form a habit of reading, to make reading one of his deep and continuing needs, is good for him." - Maya Angelou ("Any book that helps a child to form a habit of reading, to make reading one of his deep and continuing...
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Between jailed parents and their children, reading time - Sarasota Herald-Tribune

Between jailed parents and their children, reading time - Sarasota Herald-Tribune | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
Between jailed parents and their children, reading time Sarasota Herald-Tribune The Selby Library hosted the first “Read to Me” event on Saturday, where the children of parents serving sentences in the Sarasota County Jail could listen to a...
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Bell Elementary principal hits the roof to promote reading - Las Vegas Review-Journal

Bell Elementary principal hits the roof to promote reading - Las Vegas Review-Journal | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
Las Vegas Review-Journal Bell Elementary principal hits the roof to promote reading Las Vegas Review-Journal Students crowd around a dressed-up Jaymes Aimetti, principal of Rex Bell Elementary School, as he prepares to climb on to the roof to read...
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The Most Important Lesson Schools Can Teach Kids About Reading: It's Fun | Latest Reading and Education News | Reading Rockets

The Most Important Lesson Schools Can Teach Kids About Reading: It's Fun | Latest Reading and Education News | Reading Rockets | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
Offers effective teaching strategies, activities, lessons, lesson plans, worksheets, exercises, skills, tests, assessments for reading comprehension, language arts, literacy, fluency, phonics and phonemic awareness for children, especially those...
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Augmented Reality Flashcards to learn the alphabet!

Augmented Reality Flashcards to learn the alphabet! | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
Information and reviews about AR Flashcards

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Kindergartners 'learning new things' through sight words - Daily Ardmoreite

Kindergartners 'learning new things' through sight words - Daily Ardmoreite | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it
Kindergartners 'learning new things' through sight words
Daily Ardmoreite
... "can" easily and quickly. When teaching kindergartners the basics of reading, the first goal is to teach those frequent words often referred to by teachers as sight words.
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Great for parents to get their children started early. 

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Printable A to Z Alphabet QR Code Game for Preschool & Kindergarten! | The Preschool Toolbox Blog

Printable A to Z Alphabet QR Code Game for Preschool & Kindergarten! | The Preschool Toolbox Blog | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it

"If you are a subscriber to this blog, you are probably aware that we champion the use of appropriate and integrated technology in ECE.   As we begin a new school year, I wanted a technology center for our kids that we could use throughout the year.  The QR Code Alphabet Games below will not only help introduce your kids to QR Code technology, but they will also allow for mobile technology integration as letters/words are introduced."


Via John Evans
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Something all educators can enjoy. 

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Write to Read - Cool Learning App ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Write to Read - Cool Learning App ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Fantasy Reading World | Scoop.it

"Write to Read http://ow.ly/kHCNS  is an educational iPad app that helps young kids, ages 3-10, hone their reading skills through writing, specifically story creation. The app was developed based on input from teachers and leading Danish scientific researchers and is currently in widespread use in homes and schools throughout Denmark."


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XDiscovery's comment, May 14, 2014 11:52 AM

XDiscovery launch mobile app to learn in seconds with visual knowledge maps for 4 million topics
http://learn.xdiscovery.com