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Rescooped by Mandy Fueston from Book Websites for Young People (KES, Stratford upon Avon)
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Books for Keeps

Books for Keeps | Reading | Scoop.it

Via Lesley Watts
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Lesley Watts's curator insight, February 12, 2013 2:56 PM

UK's leading independent children's book magazine

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Love Reading 4 Schools - School book lists, guidance and convenient shopping

Love Reading 4 Schools - School book lists, guidance and convenient shopping | Reading | Scoop.it

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Heather Evans's curator insight, February 26, 2013 4:31 PM

 This site has book recommendations for year 8 & year 9 students

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An Awfully Big Blog Adventure

An Awfully Big Blog Adventure | Reading | Scoop.it

Children's authors writers from the UK share thoughts on books and writing


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Rescooped by Mandy Fueston from Book Trailers for Elementary School Students
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Dark Emperor and Other Poems of the Night

Welcome to the night, where mice stir and furry moths flutter. Where snails spiral into shells as orb spiders circle in silk. Where the roots of oak trees re...

Via Donna Anderson
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QMP's comment, April 28, 2013 9:26 PM
Thanks for the comments! I did indeed find everything through scoopit, but it was also really difficult for me too. I think the fact that my topic is broad certainly helped, but I did use many keywords as well, and had to be really specific in my searches. Even then, I had to go through a lot of posts to find these! As far as other poem reccomendations go that are relevant to this book, I picked up a good book this week from our readings called ‘The House of Boo’ by J. Patrick Lewis. Very spooky and fun!
Kim Rowley's comment, April 28, 2013 10:12 PM
Thanks for your feedback Quinn! I had a difficult time finding anything relevant through this site so kudos!
Amy Dean's comment, April 29, 2013 7:32 PM
Thanks for giving some insight into re-scooping, Quinn! I didn't really find anything I loved using the suggested content feature, so specific searches will be what I try next.
Rescooped by Mandy Fueston from Book Trailers for Elementary School Students
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Savvy book trailer

For generations, the Beaumont family has harbored a magical secret. They each possess a "savvy" — a special supernatural power that strikes when they turn th...

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Helen O'Brien's curator insight, January 2, 2014 2:32 PM

One of my favorite books!

Rescooped by Mandy Fueston from Great Middle School Reads: Videos
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Hunger Games - Official Teaser [HD]

The Hunger Games is coming to a theater near you, very soon.

 

Subscribe http://ow.ly/3UVvY | Facebook http://ow.ly/3UVxn | Twitter http://ow.ly/3UVyA Release Date: 23 March 2012 Genre: Action | Drama | Sci-Fi Cast: Jenn...


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Strategic Reading: What the Mind Needs to Do to Read Nonfiction

Strategic Reading: What the Mind Needs to Do to Read Nonfiction | Reading | Scoop.it

By Nancy Akhavan

 

Many children are not strategic readers of nonfiction text; they dive into reading nonfiction the same way they approach a story or a novel. But if students are to become literate readers in a world filled with an abundance of information, they need to be good readers and strategic readers. Strategic readers

establish goals for reading;select reading strategies appropriate for the text they are reading;monitor their reading to determine if they are comprehending or not; andhave a positive attitude toward reading.
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Dyslexia Today's curator insight, November 10, 2013 8:13 PM

A good overview of what reading instruction really is, it is not about decoding text. When people argue that text to speech is not reading, we at Dyslexia Today argue that for a dyslexic it is all about getting to what this article is about. Learning about different types of text and how to handle each one.

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Cool & New | Teenreads

Cool & New | Teenreads | Reading | Scoop.it
Looking for a great new read? Every month, our Cool & New Books feature spotlights new titles that we think you'll want to explore.

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Rescooped by Mandy Fueston from Book Websites for Young People (KES, Stratford upon Avon)
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Books Teens & Magazines

Books Teens & Magazines | Reading | Scoop.it
Books Teens And Magazines, A Book/Magazine Reviewing Website For Teenagers

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Rescooped by Mandy Fueston from Book Trailers for Elementary School Students
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Shark vs Train

WHO WILL WIN? It's chew vs choo in this hilarious new picture book from Chris Barton and Tom Lichtenheld.

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Owly Animation - Andy Runton's Owly - Owly and wormy

Owly Animation - Andy Runton's Owly - Owly and wormy http://www.andyrunton.com/...

 

Owly books are great graphic novels with only pictures.


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Rescooped by Mandy Fueston from Great Middle School Reads: Videos
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Wonderstruck by Brian Selznick

A sneak peek into WONDERSTRUCK, the upcoming novel told in words and pictures by Brian Selznick, the Caldecott winning creator of THE INVENTION OF HUGO CABRE...

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Rescooped by Mandy Fueston from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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A New Kind Of Literary Analysis

A New Kind Of Literary Analysis | Reading | Scoop.it
Does our scientific justification of the arts suggest that we've lost faith in literature?

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, November 8, 2013 12:07 PM

This is one of those articles for which my immediate reaction is, "I agree, but..."

 

I can't help but agree with author Ethan Gilsdorf's saying that "Hopefully this data will provide further ammunition against those nay-sayers who argue the arts are a luxury. Now school boards can claim books make us better leaders, better decision makers, better business-people." but...

 

I can't help but agree with Gilsdorf that "It's sad we need another sudy loaded with finite statistics to defend...," storytelling. but...

 

I can't help but, at least partially agree with Gilsdorf's  contention that, "Perhaps science coming to the rescue is not a surprising state of affairs. American culture has always been driven by results. Profits. Numbers. The bottom line. We're lean and mean. We don't pretend to have much time or patience for superfluous or non-measurable activities that drain resources and take our eyes off the ball game." but...

 

I only wish that Ethan Gilsdorf, author of this article, had recognized the value of evidence coming from sources that quite often speak to elements of knowing outside the area of knowing we who already know the value of literary reading and who are too often thereby dismissed as biased incapable of being objective. 

 

We may speak well to those who speak our language, but let's face it. We speak about a kind of knowing that is not as commonly seen as having value  as we might wish it were. We speak of wisdom and we speak of it indirectly speaking more often, I would guess, to the heart hoping that through the heart a meaningful message finds significant traction in the intellect. 

 

In a sense, science short cuts the journey for all of us who first recognize that the upside of science is that it relies upon measureable truth; a basis that I would hope is seen as a starting point for all thinking people whether they also appreciate litearary reading or not.

 

But, in science's ability to reach those who understand the value of measureable truth, who DO NOT engage in literary reading, science often reaches an audience with a measure of success that we who love literary reading do not reach so successfully. And, among the element of society that they reach more successfully than we do are people who vote for educational funding, people who believe that literary reading has no practical value, people who believe facts and skills are the whole story of knowing. And, reaching those folks is more critical than ever. 

 

Of course we wish that those who we haven't reached would have recognized the value of the wisdom that literary reading brings to humanity through the fine jobs we've done in promoting literary reading. But, science is at least catching the attention of many of those who we hadn't reached. 

 

One of my favorite experiences in life has been the experience of having a "light go on." You know those, "Duh! Why didn't I think of that?" moments. 

 

They're great moments, and I usually have someone who said something in a way I was capable of hearing in a way I hadn't thought about before. And, more often than not, those moments opened  whole new area of mindfulness for me that made it easier for me to allow a whole slew of related new perspectives to find their way into the incomplete mosaic of my previous understanding and appreciation for the arena of knowing that the new "Ah Ha!" moment had brought to my knowing.

 

Though Gilsdorf bemoans the need to rely upon measurables that science brings to literary appreciation, we should recognize two important contributions they are making:

 

First, we who teach literary reading are expected, like or not to make the connection between literary reading and preparing students for college and career, the two criteria for a good education, that are dominating the conversation about educational reform. Science is providing kind of data that is extremely difficult to collect, synthesize, and integrate into data-driven decision making processes.

 

Second, though presented as data which may generate a Pavlovian negative response among the literati, we should note that they are focusing upon literary reading's great contributions of enhanced understanding of the world within which we all must get along. They are somehow quantifying, for those who believe quantitative data is the only data worth paying attention to, the benefits of empathy, compassion, and the influences of literature upon which human beings' consideration of what it is to pursue not just a quantitatively successful life, but also a qualitatively successful life. 

 

Rather than bemoan science's focus upon finding  the measurables of literary reading, perhaps we might consider finding ways to return the favor by finding literary means for reaching the anti-science crowd out there.

 

 

Don't miss the links to several articles and reports defending literary reading  coming to us from the science-side of knowing.

 

 http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google  Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit.

 

Dennis Ricardo Hidalgo's curator insight, November 9, 2013 2:44 AM

So, this is what we have known since we picked up our first book, at least, some of us, namely, that reading stories, quality literature can make us better humans in more than one way. 

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Best Young Adult Fantasy & Science Fiction 2013 — Goodreads Choice Awards

Best Young Adult Fantasy & Science Fiction 2013 — Goodreads Choice Awards | Reading | Scoop.it
Discover the Best Young Adult Fantasy & Science Fiction in the 2013 Goodreads Choice Awards, the only major book awards decided by readers. (CROWN OF MIDNIGHT made it to the semifinals in the Goodreads Choice Awards!
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