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Reading Activity Reading Comprehension at GCFLearnFree.org

Reading Activity Reading Comprehension at GCFLearnFree.org | Reading | Scoop.it
Reading Activity Reading Comprehension - How well do you understand the things you read? Test and improve your reading with our reading comprehension activity! This activity includes 140 texts, each with a set of challenging questions.

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 20, 2013 8:51 PM

If you are looking for online books to help beginner readers or ELL students check out 140 texts available at GCF Learn Free. Each text can be read to the student and there are four questions for each story. If a student answers a question incorrectly they may try again.

Jessica Janus's curator insight, October 23, 2014 9:26 PM

I tired this out and I think this is a great tool to integrate within the classroom. Perhaps on  Friday when there is some free time.

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Project to boost reading skills

Sheffield secondary schools are being signed up for a pioneering literacy project being run in conjunction between Sheffield University and the council.

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, October 15, 2013 6:33 PM

Sheffield secondary schools are being signed up for a pioneering literacy project being run in conjunction between Sheffield University and the council.

 

The Literary Exchange and Achievement Programme – LEAP – will seek to boost reading skills among pupils needing help to progress to further education or employment.

Groups of youngsters will be partnered with English and education undergraduates to improve their reading comprehension abilities in particular.

From this term the undergraduates and pupils will work together using internationally recognised methods to improve literacy.

Project officer Matt Colbeck said: “The pupils taking part in this project will get a unique opportunity to work with university student mentors to help them improve their literacy.”

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Model school aims to retrain teachers in ABCs of reading instruction - PBS

Model school aims to retrain teachers in ABCs of reading instruction - PBS | Reading | Scoop.it
Model school aims to retrain teachers in ABCs of reading instruction
PBS
Learning to read is the essential foundation of elementary education, but it's also very complex and many students in America are falling behind.
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Reading literary fiction improves 'mind-reading' skills, research shows

Reading literary fiction improves 'mind-reading' skills, research shows | Reading | Scoop.it
Heated debates about the quantifiable value of arts and literature are a common feature of American social discourse. Now, two researchers from The New School for Social Research have published a paper in Science ...
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Rescooped by Laura Crisp from Common Core Online
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Selective Highlighting: Reading with a Purpose

Selective Highlighting: Reading with a Purpose | Reading | Scoop.it
Teaching students to read with a purpose can be challenging. See how using the simple technique of selective highlighting will help many students to better understand what they read.

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Help Students With Comprehension Through Collaborative Reading - Edudemic

Help Students With Comprehension Through Collaborative Reading - Edudemic | Reading | Scoop.it
Collaborative reading and digital devices can give students a huge boost in comprehension. How? Take a look at these great tips from Holly Clark.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Could reading 'Crime and Punishment' make you better at reading ...

Could reading 'Crime and Punishment' make you better at reading ... | Reading | Scoop.it
What do the arts mean to our lives? To at least some researchers, they're a way that we learn how the people around us think. Previous studies have concluded that reading fiction is correlated with...
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Writing, Inquiry, Collaboration & Reading

Writing, Inquiry, Collaboration & Reading | Reading | Scoop.it
Learn about WICR, or Writing, Inquiry, Collaboration & Reading. This is the basis of AVID, but can be used in every classroom, as these are skills students need to learn for academic success.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Study finds Reading Tolstoy & other great novelists can - Open Culture

Study finds Reading Tolstoy & other great novelists can - Open Culture | Reading | Scoop.it
A new study published this week in Science concludes that you may get something unexpected from reading great literary works: more finely-tuned social and.
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Study: Children Reading Fewer Books, Down 8% From 2012 ...

Study: Children Reading Fewer Books, Down 8% From 2012 ... | Reading | Scoop.it
The Harry Potter series is wildly entertaining, but so is Angry Birds, Snapchat, Facebook, YouTube Justin Bieber re-enactments, texting, Halo, The Disney Channel, Transformers 3, and a consumer flying drone.
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One of the most important reading and writing skills: Showing Evidence

One of the most important reading and writing skills: Showing Evidence | Reading | Scoop.it
Common Core skill: Showing evidence from the text to support your answer

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Katie Halberg's curator insight, October 15, 2013 11:14 PM

I really enjoyed reading this, It states how with a little hard work and using are minds we can answer easy questions like "how did reading that book make you feel" the answer to that questions is not inside that book, you have to read the book to use your own feelings and thoughts to answer the question. it always shows how times have changed and auto books help the few people who wont really open a book to read it or may not know how to read very well but still want to know more about whats inside the book.

Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, October 17, 2013 12:33 PM

One of the most important reading and writing skills students should practice is showing evidence from the text to support their answers. However, many of my students struggle with this. In the past, our students have been programmed to fill in a bubble answer on a standardized test that shows the evidence rather than try to find it themselves.

Show your students how to give evidence by demonstrating it (see visual aid, above).
My example question is from Divergent by Veronica Roth. It asks: “How does Beatrice’s mother feel about her? Give evidence from chapter one to support your answer.”

In the past, students may have just given me short answers like, "She cares about her daughter." By asking for evidence, students can't just give their opinion. We know their opinion is based on something, so they have to be further prompted to tell us what they based it on. Therefore, the student's answer should include not only their opinion, but one or two examples from the text that show this. Their answers should be paraphrased, but they still need to include the page number. 
This question-strategy helps those struggling readers find the right answers, as well. If a student wrote, "She's mean," he/she would have to back it up with an example from the chapter that shows Beatrice's mother is mean. When he/she can't find an example, he/she will have to re-think his/her original opinion. 
For students who are really struggling, I may prompt them orally with questions like, "Look at the non-verbal clues: what is Beatrice's mom doing to Beatrice in the first scene of the book? What does her mood seem to be? How do you know she feels this way? When a mother acts this way toward a child, what does it indicate about how she feels toward the child?" 


There are always a handful of students who complain that they can't find the answers in the book. If you have these same complainers, these are your students who are not reading the book. Because even students who have severe learning disabilities can answer the questions when they read it (or listen to the text).

So here's what I say to the complainers: "You aren't going to find a single sentence that gives you the answer to the question. And the answer isn't merely your opinion, either. The answer comes from that feeling you get about the character, or the theme, or whatever it is you're looking for. It's based on what you've inferred and gathered from descriptions and dialogue that can only come from reading it. Simply put, there is no short cut. The text must be read to answer the questions."

[Insert student groans.] After they channel their inner first-grader and throw another "I don't want to read" fit, they usually buck up and start reading.

Note: I do not mind allowing students to listen to audio of the text, especially if they follow along with their books. If this is the only way to get those reluctant readers to read, I say go for it. Today's teens are not like us. They learn much differently; we need to access and use every resource, device, and strategy to help them read on their own.

If you need handouts for instituting the Common Core standards into your curriculum, I have you covered! Check out all these great resources, ready to use with ANY text (fiction or non-fiction):
CCSS Reading Graphic Organizers, Grades 6,7,8
CCSS Reading Graphic Organizers, Grades 9-10 (Also covers grades 6-8)
CCSS Reading Graphic Organizers, Grades 11-12 (Also covers grades 6-10)

For non-fiction text and historical documents:
CCSS History & Social Studies Reading Graphic Organizers, Grades 6-12

For non-fiction and scientific texts:
CCSS Science & Technical Subjects Reading Graphic Organizers, Grades 6-12
FREE: CCSS Science & Technical Subjects Reading Graphic Organizers for RST.1, Grades 6-12

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Literacy: Fewer children reading in spare time, research suggests - BBC News

Literacy: Fewer children reading in spare time, research suggests - BBC News | Reading | Scoop.it
Literacy: Fewer children reading in spare time, research suggests
BBC News
By Angela Harrison Education correspondent, BBC News. Boy reading Reading is most ...
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