Reading and Writing
10 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Todd Bratcher from Creative Writers
Scoop.it!

Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators

Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
The psychological origins of waiting (... and waiting, and waiting) to work

Via Sharon Bakar
Todd Bratcher's insight:

This is one of the most insightful, relatable articles I have ever read. To be honest my mind is still blown and I'm currently rethinking life. Anyway, Megan Mcardle points out the demise of writers and how their generational upbringing has lead to their ultimate inadequacies.  

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Todd Bratcher from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

7 New Rules For Writing The Perfect Cover Letter

7 New Rules For Writing The Perfect Cover Letter | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
Cover letter writing has changed with the times. We talked to career experts to get a fresh take on an old exercise.

Via Charles Tiayon
Todd Bratcher's insight:

Applying for a new job can be nerve-wracking but there are many things one can do to feel prepared and stand out as a good candidate for any position. One of the most important parts of the hiring process is the cover letter and resume. It is your first chance to make an impression on a hiring manager and prove you have what it takes to fulfill the position. The culture of the cover letter has changed in recent times, with companies expecting a different approach to the old fashion "I can do this and this and this and this" letter. "Gone are the days where you could spend a few paragraphs detailing your own accomplishments. Today, you also need to demonstrate a genuine interest in the company and prove you know how to help it." This article gives 7 excellent tips to keeping an employers attention while distinguishing yourself from the rest of the crowd.

more...
Charles Tiayon's curator insight, October 13, 2013 8:31 PM

It used to be that your cover letter was all about you. But things have changed.

 

The modern cover letter should focus first and foremost on the company it's directed to, career experts say. Gone are the days where you could spend a few paragraphs detailing your own accomplishments. Today, you also need to demonstrate a genuine interest in the company and prove you know how to help it.

"People need to focus their cover letters on the company they’re applying to, not on themselves," says Dan Schawbel, author of best-selling book "Promote Yourself" and managing partner of consultancy Millennial Branding. "Show how you can make a difference for that company."

That's easier said than done, especially when you're trying to distinguish yourself among dozens or hundreds of other applicants. Below, career experts weigh in on the new essential guidelines to writing a successful cover letter.



Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-new-rules-of-the-modern-cover-letter-2013-10#ixzz2heTc2U2N

Rescooped by Todd Bratcher from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
Scoop.it!

How to Train Your Mind to Think Critically and Form Your Own Opinions

How to Train Your Mind to Think Critically and Form Your Own Opinions | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
"Critical Thinking" may sound like an obnoxious buzzword from liberal arts schools, but it's actually a useful skill. Critical thinking just means absorbing important information and using that to form a decision or opinion of your own--rather than just spouting off what you hear others say. This doesn't always come naturally to us, but luckily, it's something you can train yourself to do better.

 

Critical thinking doesn't end. The more knowledge you cultivate, the better you'll become at thinking about it. It's navel gazing in that you're constantly thinking about thinking, but the end result is a brain that automatically forms better arguments, focused ideas, and creative solutions to problems.

 


Via Gust MEES, Lynnette Van Dyke
Todd Bratcher's insight:

Critical thinking means to ask questions that need to be asked. it involves finding the significance in every piece of information you come across and formulating opinions and plans of action. You have to ask the tough questions and the best one to start with is "Why?" Critical thinking is about being curious and allowing your sense of curiosity to follow the "why".Often times following the why will lead to finding the truths and finding lies. Critical thinking is also about honing in ones BS detector. Take time to analyze information before accepting it's credibility.

more...
Beth Kanter's curator insight, February 7, 2014 11:37 AM

Critical Thinking is the killer tool of content creators.  

Brent MacKinnon's curator insight, February 9, 2014 8:18 AM

A very practical description with examples of ways to become better in your critical thinking. A good primer for sense making as part of the PKM framework.

Terry Doherty's curator insight, February 15, 2014 8:00 PM

"Navel gazing." I haven't heard that term in ages ... and don't do it near enough.

 

Rescooped by Todd Bratcher from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

9 Tips On How To Totally Crush Writer’s Block | Positive Writer

9 Tips On How To Totally Crush Writer’s Block | Positive Writer | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
If you've ever been stuck, unable to write or at a loss for words, you'll want to read this.

Via Penelope
Todd Bratcher's insight:

Who of us hasn't suffered from writer's block? Maybe you have a different term for it: stuck, burned out, or just plain uninspired? Whatever you call it, it stinks. Sitting down at the computer and the words just won't come? What's a writer to do?

 The good news? If you've suffered from writer's block, you are a writer! Congratulations. So if you're not suffering, you're probably not writing. There are nine actionable strategies in this article to to help us..and pronto!

 

1. Admit you get stuck from time to time.

2. Admit that it’s okay to get stuck.

3. Take a break.

4. Don’t self-deprecate!

5. Know that you’re better than you think you are.

6. Don’t describe yourself as a suffering artist.

7. Be audacious.

8. Accept discouragement as part of the writer’s life, but do not give in to despair.

9. Accept yourself (and your writing) as you are right now.

 

Sometimes writer's block is a sign that you are going to have a major breakthrough in your writing. Try to ride the tide,  break through that wave, and be assured you will reach the glorious shoreline.

more...
Penelope's curator insight, March 11, 2014 7:16 PM

 

Who of us hasn't suffered from writer's block?

 

Maybe you have a different term for it: stuck, burned out, or just plain uninspired? Whatever you call it, it stinks. Sitting down at the computer and the words just won't come? What's a writer to do?

 

The good news? If you've suffered from writer's block, you are a writer! Congratulations. So if you're not suffering, you're probably not writing.

 

There are nine actionable strategies in this article to to help us..and pronto!

 

1. Admit you get stuck from time to time.

2. Admit that it’s okay to get stuck.

3. Take a break.

4. Don’t self-deprecate!

5. Know that you’re better than you think you are.

6. Don’t describe yourself as a suffering artist.

7. Be audacious.

8. Accept discouragement as part of the writer’s life, but do not give in to despair.

9. Accept yourself (and your writing) as you are right now.

 

Sometimes writer's block is a sign that you are going to have a major breakthrough in your writing. Try to ride the tide,  break through that wave, and be assured you will reach the glorious shoreline.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article:  http://positivewriter.com/writers-block/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+PositiveWriter+%28Positive+Writer%29

Rescooped by Todd Bratcher from blended learning
Scoop.it!

How To Read A Book: 3 Strategies For Critical Reading

How To Read A Book: 3 Strategies For Critical Reading | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
How To Read A Book: 3 Strategies For Critical Reading

Via Vladimir Kukharenko
Todd Bratcher's insight:

Reading can be many things. People can read for fun, for insight, for motivation, for information, the list goes on but in each of these cases it is important to note HOW one reads. This article describes 3 strategies for critical reading to get the most out of your book of choice. The first is inspectional reading. This is where the "reading for fun" category of people tend to stay. It involves "systematic skimming" and just simply reading a book in its entirety to understand the overall concept. The next strategy is anylitical reading which involves taking notes and writing summaries to dissect information and think critically. The last strategy is syntopical reading which consists of reading many books and sources to correlate similar topics to find overall significance of an idea. This is the realm most scholars stay in and is the best method to get a complete, unbiased understanding of topics.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Todd Bratcher from Thinking about reading and writing
Scoop.it!

Letters of Note: Make your soul grow

Letters of Note: Make your soul grow | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it

Fascinating letters. Interesting correspondence.


Via Kim Vose
Todd Bratcher's insight:

Great and touching advice by Kurt Vannegut. It makes me happy when well known authors take time out of their busy schedules to reply to the  massive amount of mail they recieve and give advice to those who ask. Vannegut inspires these kids to think outside the box and to not be afraid of inventiveness and creativity. Sometimes we all should go on our impulses and do things just to do them regardless of how silly or immature it may be. Be creative, be artistic, make your soul grow.

more...
No comment yet.