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Six words that can ruin your sentence by Dictionary.com

Six words that can ruin your sentence by Dictionary.com | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
RT @LarryFarlow: 6 words that can like actually, literally, basically ruin your sentence | http://t.co/XlSR5duMY8 #writing
Sarah Yarborough's insight:

This article, or slideshow rather, was quite interesting because these words are words that, unfortunately, I tend to use frequently in my sentences. More so in my speech than my writing, but nonetheless I still use them. They make good points though about these words. They do tend to take away from what you are trying to say, and I will try andwatch out for these weak words in my writing from now on.

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9 Qualities of Good Writing

9 Qualities of Good Writing | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it

There are two kinds of people: Those who think they can write, and those who think they can’t. And, very often, both are wrong. The truth is, most of us fall somewhere in the middle. We are all capable of producing good writing....

 

Words matter. Your words (what you say) and style (how you say it) are your most cherished (and undervalued) assets.

 

Yet, so often, they are overlooked. Think of this way: If a visitor came to your website without its branding in place (logo, tagline, and so on), would he or she recognize it as yours? Are you telling your story there from your unique perspective, with a voice and style that’s clearly all you?

 

Here, in no particular order, is what I’ve learned about the necessary qualities of good writing (or content, in our digital vernacular), based on my own 25 years’ working as a writer and editor… and even longer career as a reader....


Via Jeff Domansky
Sarah Yarborough's insight:

I really liked this article about writing. It was very reminicent of almost every article we've read so far, along with the various chapters in They Say, I Say. It talks about how good writers support what they are saying with plenty of data, which is something we all need to make sure of in our research essays. I also like how it says that good writing comes in the rewrite, similar to the idea behind the shitty first draft article. All of these ideas and "secrets" behind how to write successfully are ones we've discussed in class- it's just a matter of actually implementing them into our papers.

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Jenny McComb's curator insight, March 5, 2014 10:35 AM

Good article! Lots of quotes from well-known authors to illustrate her points. I appreciate her thoughts on the hard work of writing, and our reluctance to call ourselves writers.

Forrest z. Tappan's curator insight, March 11, 2014 8:41 PM

I completely agree with Sarah. This article hold so many compilations to what we have been reading for class, especially in They Say, I say. I have been told many times and have grown accustomed to  believing that for every equation you add to a paper, you loss half of your readers. This is very evident if you look at the more popular articles and book. However it time I veer away from that mind set and start thinking like a research paper writer. This article has giving me some very good tips on how to rethink the way i write for this course. Specifically, Ann--the author-- make  a point that writing should be simple but not simplistic. Being more of a creative writer LOVE to confuse my readers with fancy words and alliteration and what have yous, but Ann stats that this is just not appropriate. I look forward to using what iv learned in my work.

Christopher Philbin's curator insight, August 3, 2014 9:38 PM

Just what makes good writing? These are some key points that will help the novice get on their way to becoming a better writer for sure.

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13 Ways Technology Can Improve Student Writing - Edudemic

13 Ways Technology Can Improve Student Writing - Edudemic | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
As an Edudemic reader, you are well versed in the importance of technology in education. But are you aware of the specific role it can play in writing? Take a look at the findings of a recent study.
Sarah Yarborough's insight:
I found this interesting because, all too often, technology is seen as a detriment to the writing process. It is usually technology that leads to procrastination with writing. So, the idea of using technology to enhance our writing is obviously appealing. In recent years, technology has become an integral part of the learning experience, and it's really something we should embrace in all subjects. I'm really interested in the descriptions of some of these applications. They seem like very valuable resources that I might consider using for my research paper.
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Reading for fun improves children's brains, study confirms

Reading for fun improves children's brains, study confirms | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
A study of 17,000 people from birth indicates that reading for pleasure improves not just literacy, but maths ability too, writes Alice Sullivan

Via Sue Holmes
Sarah Yarborough's insight:
This article, written by Dr. Alice Sullivan, was something I found interesting, mainly because of the format. I usually find myself drawn to more scientific studies, no matter what subject matter I'm researching. There are a few things this author does that make it such a good article. First, from the beginning, she asserts her authority. She introduces herself and her colleague, Matt Brown, and the study through which they will conduct their experiment (the British Cohort Study). She clearly explains what the study is about, and what their findings were. Although it is a pretty dry article, I think it is very informative and would provide a lot of useful information to someone looking to write on a subject regarding the effects of reading for pleasure at a young age. It is interesting that reading for fun can have long term developmental effects in people in all subjects, and I hope that schools and institutions will realize the importance of this and encourage it even more.
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This Popular Grammar Advice Is Totally Wrong

This Popular Grammar Advice Is Totally Wrong | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
This forceful call for more forceful writing is misguided; adverbs can be phonetically pleasing, can imbue sentences with subtlety, and should not be entirely shunned....

Via Sharon Bakar
Sarah Yarborough's insight:

My junior year of high school, I had an english teacher in my AP English Comp class that was VERY particular on grammar. Specifically, grammar and its relation to consision in a paper. She would literally go through our essays and cross out every last adverb that she deemed unnecessary. That always irritated me, because, as explained in this article, the are certain situations where they work with what you are saying. Personally, I think adverbs are wonderful, even if they aren't exactly part of conventional grammar rules.

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Sharon Bakar's curator insight, March 7, 2014 11:05 AM

Adverbs are fine - but only if not leaning against a weak verb.

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Spritz Wants to Change How You Read by Showing You One Word at a Time - The Slatest (blog)

Spritz Wants to Change How You Read by Showing You One Word at a Time - The Slatest (blog) | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
The Slatest (blog) Spritz Wants to Change How You Read by Showing You One Word at a Time The Slatest (blog) Reading may seem like a relaxing thing to do, and you may even worry that between Netflix, your email, and your books, you're sitting on the...
Sarah Yarborough's insight:

I've always struggled with reading at a pretty slow pace, and so this application seems potentially useful. Although, it does seem to take the point out of reading. There's just something about picking up a book and flipping through the pages that gives me such a sense of accomplishment when I finish. Personally, I believe it would be difficult to process a written document one word at a time, as it is described. It is an interesting idea though, and I would like to try it out. 

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Silent reading isn’t so silent, at least, not to your brain

Silent reading isn’t so silent, at least, not to your brain | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it

If you're reading this sentence, chances are you're reading it silently (if you're reading it out loud, hey, that's cool too). Your lips aren't moving, you're not making any sound that other people can hear. But are you making "sound" in your head? Many people who read silently do so by imagining a voice speaking the words they are reading (and often, it's your own voice, so there's even a specific "tone". I wonder if this is what makes people react so strongly to some blog posts). This could be because when we learn to read, we associate symbols with verbal sounds until the association is effortless (as for reading learning in the deaf, it may occur another way).


Via Sharon Bakar
Sarah Yarborough's insight:
Wow, this was a really fascinating article. Granted, my fascination was heightened by my ridiculous love for all things related to science, especially regarding neurology. The brain is perhaps the most intriguing phenomenon on this planet. But I love when science brings light to other subjects, like it did here. I think everyone has always wondered what makes us create this audible voice in our heads, even when we're reading silently. It's strange to think about, but really, every thought process we have is aided by a theoretical voice. What's amazing though, as shown through this study, is that our brain processes this false voice as an auditory trigger, nonetheless. So it hints at the idea that silent reading can have the exact same impact as reading done aloud, provided enough attention is put toward the action. Suddenly, I have to question the validity behind auditory versus visual learning, and how it's preferential, based on the person. This study proves that visual learning can, in fact, be the same as auditory learning. Its an interesting thought.
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Sharon Bakar's curator insight, January 30, 2014 11:36 PM

What goes on in your brain when you read silently?  Fascinating.