Reading and Writing
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Rescooped by Kassandra Aguilar from The Writing Life
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Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators

Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it

Even though we talked about this article in class, I decided to use it for this project. I chose this article because I felt that I could relate to it. Every time that I have to write a paper I always start doing everything expect for writing the paper. Even though I know I should take my time writing the paper I feel that I do better when I procrastinate. 

The psychological origins of waiting (... and waiting, and waiting) to work

Via Kim Vose
Kassandra Aguilar's insight:

Even though we talked about this article in class, I decided to use it for this project. I chose this article because I felt that I could relate to it. Every time that I have to write a paper I always start doing everything expect for writing the paper. Even though I know I should take my time writing the paper I feel that I do better when I procrastinate. 

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Kim Vose's curator insight, February 12, 2014 7:56 PM

This article echoes what I was already slowly concluding about procrastination.

Alex Cowans's curator insight, March 6, 2014 6:55 PM

This is a great meeting point of sorts between my research paper and the writing class. One thing that I thought was interesting and hadn't come across in my research was the concept of self-handicapping. I also agree with the end of the article where the author talks about letting kids make mistakes so they can learn from them. Let kids be "bad writers" because that's where the growth happens. Most of the improvements I've made in writing throughout school was when I got a paper back that explained what I did (or didn't do) to recieve the grade that I got.

Rescooped by Kassandra Aguilar from Thinking about reading and writing
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Ink on Paper: Some Notes on Note-taking

Ink on Paper: Some Notes on Note-taking | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
Two Princeton University psychological scientists wondered if laptops, despite their plusses, might lead to a shallower kind of cognitive processing, and to lower quality learning. They decided to test the old and the new in a head-to-head contest.

Via Kim Vose
Kassandra Aguilar's insight:

When I came across this article I decided to choose this for my scoop-it page because I found it interesting that even though they that drinking this water could be harmful they still tell the residents that it is okay for them to use it. Also it caught my attention because back at my high school they would say that the water in the town was contaminated so I was able to relate to it a bit. This website is a reliable source because they are always posting any type of news that happen around the world and try to make sure that what they are saying is true.

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Kim Vose's curator insight, February 1, 2014 9:17 PM

This study suggests what many of us thought we knew already: that there's something about the physical act of writing that leads to increased learning and comprehension.

 

The interesting thing about this study - to me - is that it makes me wonder if taking notes with a pen and paper while reading is also more beneficial than taking notes on a laptop, especially considering how many professors use e-texts these days, particularly on the CI campus. I also wonder if annotation software, the kind that lets one make handwritten notes on a .pdf has the same learning beenfits as taking notes with a pen and paper.

 

Mayra Cecilia Ramos's curator insight, March 20, 2014 12:44 PM

The study that is being done does make you think which is more beneficial, what works better and what doesn't. I know as for myself, I work better on hands on experience having the paper in front of me instead of just looking at it online because like that I can add side notes. It is important for us college students to know how we work and learn the best so that we can be successful in our academics. 

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Letters of Note: Make your soul grow

Letters of Note: Make your soul grow | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
Fascinating letters. Interesting correspondence.

Via Kim Vose
Kassandra Aguilar's insight:

I found this article interesting because not many famous people would take time and write back to a letter that was sent to them written by a high school student. This author gave them advice and it wasn’t the same as the typical advice that is given to a high school student, like, “work hard” or “never give up on your dreams.” Even though this author is 84 he still managed to sound inspiring. I think that this is reliable because it is a letter that was written by an author and sent to some high school students that had written to him first.

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Academic360.com: Article - Active Reading for Job Search Success

Kassandra Aguilar's insight:

This article gives tips about active reading for job search success. These tips can also help when you are reading any type of literature. This article specifically helps so you can get a job, but if you put this tips in while you are reading any type of literature it could help you get a better understanding of what exactly you are reading. This article may be a little bias because it could be the things that helps the author get a better understanding.

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