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Gareth Evans: 'Welsh education may be struggling, but England is no model either' - WalesOnline

Gareth Evans: 'Welsh education may be struggling, but England is no model either' - WalesOnline | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
Gareth Evans: 'Welsh education may be struggling, but England is no model either'
WalesOnline
We should not, therefore, be surprised by today's attack by the UK Education Secretary on the increasingly vulnerable Welsh Government.
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Babel Fish? Skype Translator provides instantaneous translations for videoconferences

Babel Fish? Skype Translator provides instantaneous translations for videoconferences | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it

Story and images by Manish Singh / WinBeta Earlier this year, 

 

Earlier this year, Microsoft announced "Skype Translator", a ground breaking feature which would allow two people speaking in different languages to have audio conversations. At the company's Worldwide Partner Conference event, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella announced a development to that project -- Skype Translator now facilitates video conferencing as well.


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Rocio Watkins's curator insight, July 30, 2014 10:37 AM

Wow! 

Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, July 30, 2014 11:16 AM

Looks like we are one step closer to Gene Roddenberry's view of the future. Does this remind anyone of a universal translator??? 

terry clarke's curator insight, July 30, 2014 2:54 PM

Although universal communication among people speaking different languages is certainly a worthy goal, I am reluctant to embrace the technology that allegedly allows instantaneous translation during audio/video conferences among speakers of different languages--for many reasons.

  • My ethnic Kazakh daughter and I are bilingual (English & Russian), and I have found that the act, itself, of learning a new language necessarily draws one closer to the customs and practices of the people who use the language in their day-to-day lives (requiring an examination of nearly every aspect of the lives of those who speak the "different language"--allowing, at least the feeling of, adoption of a new and different culture).
  • Language (particularly oral as opposed to written) is an imprecise method of communication, and even experienced translators will attest that different languages have idiosyncrasies that do not allow for an accurate or precise communication of a particular idea, description or opinion sought to be сonveyed. Подвиг (Podvig) is a Russian word used to describe a particular idea in Eastern Orthodox Christianity is an example of one such word--though others may disagree
  • Because of the decline of formal language usage in favor of slang and the explosion of the use of acronyms (SMH, YOLO, WTF), and the multitudes of "figures of speech", I am skeptical that current technology exists that would allow a computer program algorithm to translate accurately and instantaneously the communications between people speaking different languages.
  • Upon reflection, I could not support the widespread use of the technology described in this article. Language, in its many different and beautiful forms, is a reflection of the culture, history and heritage of those who speak it.
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Diary of a Wimpy Kid

Diary of a Wimpy Kid | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
There are lots of adventure found in this book. Your kids will surely enjoy the story. Should I say, a perfect gift for kids at any season. Diary of a Wimpy Kid was released in April 2007 and quickly became a New York Times bestseller, eventually reaching...
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How web-based journalism reveals Common Core’s relevance | eSchool News

How web-based journalism reveals Common Core’s relevance | eSchool News | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it

In order to give students purpose to engage deeply in the Common Core, District 21 in Wheeling, Ill. has partnered with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.


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What Does Gamification Look Like In Classrooms?

What Does Gamification Look Like In Classrooms? | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
Using games or game play elements in the classroom to drive learning outcomes is sill gaining popularity. Though most teachers aren’t ready to embrace bringing serious games like Minecraft into their classrooms, many are willing to gamify learning or use other types of games. That said, getting an idea of how many teachers are (or …

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7 Student Myths of the Online Classroom

7 Student Myths of the Online Classroom | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
Thanks to technology, students and instructors can share knowledge over large distances. The online learning environment gives students the opportunity to earn a degree while working, traveling, serv...

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Can an App Change How Students Prep for College Admissions?

Can an App Change How Students Prep for College Admissions? | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
Dan Driscoll was frustrated with the SATs.
He had been running City Football Club, a nonprofit traveling soccer program for middle and high school students in his hometown of Washington, D.C., for a few years.

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Jeliber Klk's curator insight, December 19, 2013 9:44 PM

i think apps and other formsof electronic based  tools can help improve college and the way student interact with the information they are being  taught.

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50 Surprising Facts About Technology Usage In College | Edudemic

50 Surprising Facts About Technology Usage In College | Edudemic | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it

43% of college students think their school needs more technology.

Just 5% of students actually prefer learning in large online-only classes

Wikis, forums, and e-books are not a big priority for college students

The iPad is NOT the most preferred tablet on campus.

Most students think wi-fi helps them get better grades and wouldn’t attend a school without it.

50 tidbits about the usage of technology on college campuses in the infographic.


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Old-school skills: Reconstructing, rewriting and respeaking a 700-year-old language | KyForward.com

Old-school skills: Reconstructing, rewriting and respeaking a 700-year-old language | KyForward.com | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it

When University of Kentucky student Erica Mattingly enrolled in one of Andrew M. Byrd’s linguistics courses, she had no idea she would be rewriting history — or at least re-speaking it.
 
Byrd, assistant professor of linguistics in the College of Arts and Sciences, and his students have drawn national attention for their groundbreaking work to reconstruct and understand prehistoric languages.
 
Byrd has devoted much of his research time translating the language known as Proto-Indo-European.
 
The language is thought to have been first used over 7,000 years ago, with some suspecting it was spoken even earlier. Byrd’s work focuses on the sounds and structure of the PIE language, aiming to understand what it sounded like when spoken a millennia ago.
 
“To figure out what PIE sounded like, we must compare it to the most ancient Indo-European languages, like Latin, Ancient Greek and Sanskrit,” Byrd said.
 
While the nuts and bolts behind reconstructing stories in PIE is quite complicated, Byrd describes the translation process as fairly straightforward.
 
The difficulty, he says, comes from knowing which words the PIE speakers used, which requires study and knowledge of the culture.
 
“For each sentence you want to write, you must consider the words the PIE speakers used to convey concepts as well as the word order. Once you have those, you’ve got yourself a reconstructed sentence,” said Byrd.
 
Mattingly, a linguistics and Spanish senior, took Byrd’s Indo-European course last year. She says her experience in the class played no small part in her decision to pursue a career in linguistics.
 
After a study of the culture of the PIE speakers and the makeup of their language, Byrd issued a unique challenge to his class: Translate the third-ever fable into PIE.
 
When Byrd told his class that they would be reconstructing a fable into the PIE language, no one knew what an undertaking it would become. Mattingly recounts the pressure to reconstruct the language accurately.
 
“It was so, so difficult at first, because we wanted so badly to do it correctly,” she said. “These are words our linguistic ancestors spoke. So to bridge that gap in class was very meaningful to me.”
 
Byrd keeps his dynamic classroom environment full of challenge and opportunity, offering up research studies to his students interested in translating other works written in PIE and other ancient languages. These independent studies are flexible, chosen based on consideration of student interest and Byrd’s work.
 
“The work that comes out of these studies is stellar,” Byrd said.
 
Last year, Mattingly had the opportunity to complete an independent study with Byrd. Knowing her strengths after having her in class, Byrd pushed Mattingly to take a leap and work on something new.
 
She chose to look at the adaptation of the Spanish language between the years 711 and 1400 and how it shifted as a result of an influence from Arabic.
 
“Dr. Byrd inspired me to work on something that incorporated both languages that I speak,” she said. “Before working alongside him, I hadn’t thought about Islamic conquest in terms of how it affected the evolution of the Spanish language.”
 
Byrd says he likes to make his classes stand out from other linguistics courses so that his students learn the material they need while having fun.
 
“While students are asked to undertake lots of linguistic analysis, I always like to bring a little bit of fun and silliness into it, whether it’s translating a fable into PIE or analyzing the made-up language of Ramma Lamma Ding Dongian,” he said.
 
It’s that environment that encouraged Mattingly to further pursue her linguistics passion. She emphasizes the value of having Byrd as a mentor who can check in on her and she can approach with questions or concerns, as she recalls not always having the answers as a first-year student.
 
“Dr. Byrd knows his craft really well,” she said. “If I have a question, he will either have a hard answer or he’ll know exactly where to send me. He’s a great asset as a resource.”
 
For incoming linguistics students, Byrd recommends a strong desire to learn other languages and a willingness to look at things from other perspectives, which, he says, go hand in hand.
 
“My advice is to take courses in both ancient and modern languages from the wonderful faculty in the MCLLC department and Hispanic Studies Department here at UK,” he said.
 
After she graduates, Mattingly plans to pursue a master’s degree in linguistics and later start a career in translation and linguistics for the federal government.


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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, July 14, 2014 1:48 PM

When University of Kentucky student Erica Mattingly enrolled in one of Andrew M. Byrd’s linguistics courses, she had no idea she would be rewriting history — or at least re-speaking it.
 
Byrd, assistant professor of linguistics in the College of Arts and Sciences, and his students have drawn national attention for their groundbreaking work to reconstruct and understand prehistoric languages.
 
Byrd has devoted much of his research time translating the language known as Proto-Indo-European.
 
The language is thought to have been first used over 7,000 years ago, with some suspecting it was spoken even earlier. Byrd’s work focuses on the sounds and structure of the PIE language, aiming to understand what it sounded like when spoken a millennia ago.
 
“To figure out what PIE sounded like, we must compare it to the most ancient Indo-European languages, like Latin, Ancient Greek and Sanskrit,” Byrd said.
 
While the nuts and bolts behind reconstructing stories in PIE is quite complicated, Byrd describes the translation process as fairly straightforward.
 
The difficulty, he says, comes from knowing which words the PIE speakers used, which requires study and knowledge of the culture.
 
“For each sentence you want to write, you must consider the words the PIE speakers used to convey concepts as well as the word order. Once you have those, you’ve got yourself a reconstructed sentence,” said Byrd.
 
Mattingly, a linguistics and Spanish senior, took Byrd’s Indo-European course last year. She says her experience in the class played no small part in her decision to pursue a career in linguistics.
 
After a study of the culture of the PIE speakers and the makeup of their language, Byrd issued a unique challenge to his class: Translate the third-ever fable into PIE.
 
When Byrd told his class that they would be reconstructing a fable into the PIE language, no one knew what an undertaking it would become. Mattingly recounts the pressure to reconstruct the language accurately.
 
“It was so, so difficult at first, because we wanted so badly to do it correctly,” she said. “These are words our linguistic ancestors spoke. So to bridge that gap in class was very meaningful to me.”
 
Byrd keeps his dynamic classroom environment full of challenge and opportunity, offering up research studies to his students interested in translating other works written in PIE and other ancient languages. These independent studies are flexible, chosen based on consideration of student interest and Byrd’s work.
 
“The work that comes out of these studies is stellar,” Byrd said.
 
Last year, Mattingly had the opportunity to complete an independent study with Byrd. Knowing her strengths after having her in class, Byrd pushed Mattingly to take a leap and work on something new.
 
She chose to look at the adaptation of the Spanish language between the years 711 and 1400 and how it shifted as a result of an influence from Arabic.
 
“Dr. Byrd inspired me to work on something that incorporated both languages that I speak,” she said. “Before working alongside him, I hadn’t thought about Islamic conquest in terms of how it affected the evolution of the Spanish language.”
 
Byrd says he likes to make his classes stand out from other linguistics courses so that his students learn the material they need while having fun.
 
“While students are asked to undertake lots of linguistic analysis, I always like to bring a little bit of fun and silliness into it, whether it’s translating a fable into PIE or analyzing the made-up language of Ramma Lamma Ding Dongian,” he said.
 
It’s that environment that encouraged Mattingly to further pursue her linguistics passion. She emphasizes the value of having Byrd as a mentor who can check in on her and she can approach with questions or concerns, as she recalls not always having the answers as a first-year student.
 
“Dr. Byrd knows his craft really well,” she said. “If I have a question, he will either have a hard answer or he’ll know exactly where to send me. He’s a great asset as a resource.”
 
For incoming linguistics students, Byrd recommends a strong desire to learn other languages and a willingness to look at things from other perspectives, which, he says, go hand in hand.
 
“My advice is to take courses in both ancient and modern languages from the wonderful faculty in the MCLLC department and Hispanic Studies Department here at UK,” he said.
 
After she graduates, Mattingly plans to pursue a master’s degree in linguistics and later start a career in translation and linguistics for the federal government.

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Poor pupils in London outstrip rich in rest of country - BBC News

Poor pupils in London outstrip rich in rest of country - BBC News | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
BBC News Poor pupils in London outstrip rich in rest of country BBC News The proportion of poorer pupils in inner London going into higher education (63%) is higher than better off pupils in the north east (54%), north west (57%), east midlands...
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London's disadvantaged pupils outperform those elsewhere in ...

London's disadvantaged pupils outperform those elsewhere in ... | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
Schoolchildren from disadvantaged backgrounds in London are getting better academic results than pupils in the rest of England, according to a new study published on Monday. The Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) research ...
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UK EDUCATION: City banker to take case to court over Gove's ban on term time holidays - Telegraph

UK EDUCATION: City banker to take case to court over Gove's ban on term time holidays  - Telegraph | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
James Haymore, a banker, will appear in court in a test case to argue that Michael Gove's ban on taking children out of school during term time breaches their human rights

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A Few Short Rules on Being Creative - Huffington Post

A Few Short Rules on Being Creative - Huffington Post | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it

vinA Few Short Rules on Being Creative
Huffington Post
There are two ways of collecting knowledge and experience for the use in a creative process, indirect and direct.


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Mobile Phones - Do They Affect Your Child's Education?

Mobile Phones - Do They Affect Your Child's Education? | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
&appId;
Recent reports reveal that kids across the UK are handing in schoolwork infested with "text speak". This alarming development is being blamed on electronic communication devices, most notably mobile phones.
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Free Technology for Teachers: Ten Resources for Helping Students Learn to Code and Program

Free Technology for Teachers: Ten Resources for Helping Students Learn to Code and Program | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it

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Keep the Coast Clear: Of Turtles and Trash: What trash on Belize's shores suggests about global problems

Keep the Coast Clear: Of Turtles and Trash: What trash on Belize's shores suggests about global problems | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it

Very interesting story about a group of students traveling to Bacalar Chico National Park and Marine Reserve in Belize to cleanup a turtle nesting site.  They analyzed the trash and found...

 

"...Jon and his student teams began to categorize the garbage they found – much like Ocean Conservancy does during the annual International Coastal Cleanup – to figure out where all the trash was coming from and how they could stop it. They learned amazing things about the profile of the garbage:..."


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Non-EU postgraduate numbers in UK fall for first time in 16 years

Non-EU postgraduate numbers in UK fall for first time in 16 years | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it

Number of postgraduate students travelling to UK from non-EU countries fell 1% in 2011/12 academic year

The number of postgraduate students travelling from non-EU countries to study at UK universities has fallen for the first time in 16 years, fuelling fears that the government's immigration crackdown is deterring thousands of the brightest students from continuing their studies in Britain...


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Can Textbooks Ever Really Be Free? - Technology - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Can Textbooks Ever Really Be Free? - Technology - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
Many agree that making books free for college students is a good idea. But nobody's found a great way to do it.

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A total lack of planning over EU immigration - Telegraph

A total lack of planning over EU immigration - Telegraph | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it

When eight eastern European countries joined the EU in 2004, expectations of a “migrant invasion” were largely discounted by ministers and officials. Not only did the Home Office predict an upper limit of 13,000 per annum arriving to work in the UK, but most academic studies also concluded that there would be no mass movement of labour. They were wrong. More than one million Poles and other nationals from the old Warsaw Pact nations have come to Britain alone – principally because ours was the only major economy to open its doors immediately after enlargement. Germany, France and other “old EU” countries restricted access to the labour market for seven years. The accession of Romania and Bulgaria in 2007 brought two of the continent’s poorest countries into the EU, with their citizens able to avail themselves of the free movement of people that is a fundamental principle of membership. Again, transitional controls were imposed on access to the labour markets of other member states. This time, the UK kept restrictions in place, but had to lift them along with the rest of the EU when they expired yesterday. The particular concern in this country about the prospects for significant immigration from Romania and Bulgaria stems, therefore, from its experience with the previous enlargement. Matters are different this time because we are not the only country opening its labour market, though there are more job prospects in the UK than elsewhere and access to benefits is also easier. After getting its forecasts so spectacularly wrong last time, the Home Office simply refuses to make any predictions for the numbers that might arrive from Romania and Bulgaria. While this reluctance is understandable, it makes life difficult for councils, who need to plan for additional school places or the provision of other services. Moreover, why is it so difficult for GPs to establish whether people have a genuine right to free NHS care? It must be possible to set up a checking system without doctors complaining that they are being asked to act as border policemen. Indeed, the most unsatisfactory aspect of this whole affair has been the total lack of planning. The rapid enlargement of the EU (which the UK championed) was inevitably going to lead to people in poorer countries moving to wealthier ones to find work. However, no real efforts were made to prepare the citizens of the receiving countries for the influx, and they are now expected to deal with the consequences without demur. It is hardly surprising then, as Peter Oborne observes on the page opposite, that there is such widespread popular disdain for the lack of democracy in the EU.

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Powerful pledges by UK and Developing Country Governments lead ...

Powerful pledges by UK and Developing Country Governments lead ... | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
Today RESULTS UK welcomed an important pledge by the UK's Department for International Development (DFID), announced by Minister Lynne Featherstone at today's Global Partnership for Education (GPE) replenishment ...
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Government outlines how technology can benefit further education ...

Government outlines how technology can benefit further education ... | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
Matthew Hancock has announced government plans to boost technology in order to improve further education. ... Skip to main content. GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. Find out more about cookies · GOV.UK.
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