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Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators

Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it

The psychological origins of waiting (... and waiting, and waiting) to work


Via Sharon Bakar
Emily Larson's insight:

I know the pains of procrastination ALL too well! I find always find articles about procrastination to be interesting because they are both relatable and applicable to college students. I think this author did a good job at not running on too long with the topic and making it easy to read.

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Common Core in Action: Writing for an Audience

Common Core in Action: Writing for an Audience | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
What is new and different in the Common Core? When it comes to the writing standards, a heavy emphasis on audience for one thing, and this is very good news.
Emily Larson's insight:

I found this article to be interesting because it discussed the importance of writing to a specific audience, which we talked about in class on Tuesday. Also, the author made very good points on how we should be applying this method to our writing starting at a much younger age. It makes our writing more natural when we know who we are speaking to. The author gave great examples of ways in which teachers can and should incorporate that writing skill into their students writing assignments from second through twelfth grade.

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How to Write More and Write Quickly - Huffington Post

How to Write More and Write Quickly - Huffington Post | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
How to Write More and Write Quickly
Huffington Post
Small business owners have a lot of writing to do. Keeping up with writing for social media, blog posts, books or client presentations can be one of the most challenging things to do effectively.
Emily Larson's insight:

Though the points listed in this article on how to write more efficiently seem very simple, and almost unnecessary to say, I think it is great to be reminded to do them. I especially liked what the author said about focusing on content before form and speaking your writing out loud rather than strictly typing it. I think that these are helpful tips for all people who have to do some form of writing for work or school. 

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7 Creative Proofreading Tips To Transform Your Jaggedy Draft into a Polished Post

7 Creative Proofreading Tips To Transform Your Jaggedy Draft into a Polished Post | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
Stefanie Flaxman delivers seven tips that help you infuse creativity into the process of turning a rough draft into a polished post.

Via Alessandro Rea
Emily Larson's insight:

Since we are in the process of revising our first draft research papers right now, I found this article very relevant. It was really interesting to me how the author explained that proofreading and creativity go hand in hand. I liked the list format that the author used to convey they points very clearly. And their seven points were very useful to me.

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Alex Cowans's curator insight, March 20, 2014 6:52 PM

I found this article very helpful if you are stuck with a necessity to revise your paper but don't know exactly where to start. It's a great checklist to use in order to help your paper be in the best possible shape. It includes basic tips such as fixing grammatical errors but also includes things that I would't have even thought of such as detaching your ego and choosing your words wisely. I definitely plan on using this article to help me revise my papers!

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Writing Tip: Feed Your Brain - Robin Parrish

Writing Tip: Feed Your Brain - Robin Parrish | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
One of the basic tenets of creative writing is that feasting on a regular diet of good literature will help improve your own writing. And I agree that there's value in this tactic. But that's not the kind of “brain food” I want to talk about ...
Emily Larson's insight:

I found this short article interesting because it did not just talk about the brain food that we need to improve our writing,meaning good literature, but also actual food. While it seems a very simple thing, it is good to me reminded of this fact. Our brains are muscles and we need to eat in order to give our brains energy. For me, I tend to procrastinate on assignments and that leads to sitting down and writing for long periods of time. While I hope I don't find myself in that situation again, if I do I will remember to eat while I am writing, or take a snack break, so that I have more energy to produce better writing.

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