Reading and Writing
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7 Creative Proofreading Tips To Transform Your Jaggedy Draft into a Polished Post

7 Creative Proofreading Tips To Transform Your Jaggedy Draft into a Polished Post | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
Stefanie Flaxman delivers seven tips that help you infuse creativity into the process of turning a rough draft into a polished post.

Via Alessandro Rea
Alex Cowans's insight:

I found this article very helpful if you are stuck with a necessity to revise your paper but don't know exactly where to start. It's a great checklist to use in order to help your paper be in the best possible shape. It includes basic tips such as fixing grammatical errors but also includes things that I would't have even thought of such as detaching your ego and choosing your words wisely. I definitely plan on using this article to help me revise my papers!

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Emily Larson's curator insight, March 6, 2014 2:35 PM

Since we are in the process of revising our first draft research papers right now, I found this article very relevant. It was really interesting to me how the author explained that proofreading and creativity go hand in hand. I liked the list format that the author used to convey they points very clearly. And their seven points were very useful to me.

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Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators

Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
The psychological origins of waiting (... and waiting, and waiting) to work

Via Kim Vose
Alex Cowans's insight:

This is a great meeting point of sorts between my research paper and the writing class. One thing that I thought was interesting and hadn't come across in my research was the concept of self-handicapping. I also agree with the end of the article where the author talks about letting kids make mistakes so they can learn from them. Let kids be "bad writers" because that's where the growth happens. Most of the improvements I've made in writing throughout school was when I got a paper back that explained what I did (or didn't do) to recieve the grade that I got.

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Kim Vose's curator insight, February 12, 2014 7:56 PM

This article echoes what I was already slowly concluding about procrastination.

Kassandra Aguilar's curator insight, March 20, 2014 2:14 PM

Even though we talked about this article in class, I decided to use it for this project. I chose this article because I felt that I could relate to it. Every time that I have to write a paper I always start doing everything expect for writing the paper. Even though I know I should take my time writing the paper I feel that I do better when I procrastinate. 

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allen--the-inspired-writing-vs-the-real-writer.pdf

Alex Cowans's insight:

This article is really great. It goes along the lines of the article we read earlier this week about shitty first drafts. The author explains the myth of the "Inspired Writer" as a figure who is always willing to write and what they write is perfect and needs no revision. I can relate with this "figure" to the Performing Arts. We often look at those who do exceptionally well in their art as being geniuses because we never would have thought about doing that. Like the author says, getting to that exceptional piece of work requires a lot of trial and error and hard work. Maybe their creative process is more refined and streamlined like the author's favorite scholar's creative process. Another thing the author touches on is that when you want someone to proofread your article, make sure it's someone related to the field, otherwise your reader may get lost. This is a great help because I feel like a lot of students hide their work in a vault until they need to hand it in to the professor. But having a peer read your work will give you a different but well-trained perspective. Perhaps you may need to expand on section A but condense section C because it's too descriptive. Overall this article is another great tool to help the new/shy writer.

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reid--ten-ways-to-think.pdf

Alex Cowans's insight:

I found this article really helpful in how to approach writing an essay. I almost consider it an expansion and explanation behind Bob Mayberry's article "Myth-Rules of Writing". It is lengthy but I found the information very relatable and helpful. The article provides great metaphors and examples for choosing which "writing rules" to follow based on your target audience. By choosing which "rules" to follow, it opens up the writer's creativity and reduces writing anxiety.

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Why You Need to Become a Better Storyteller

Why You Need to Become a Better Storyteller | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it
Compelling stories have the power to engage your customers, your employees and your investors. Here's how to improve your skills.
Alex Cowans's insight:

I think that this article is a great set of advice on how to make your writing interesting by telling a story. It outlines all of the reasons as to why you should be a storyteller when you write. I know for me, I have a hard time including stories in my academic writing because I've been "programmed" to keep the personal aspect of things out of it. I'm actually starting to feel comfortable with personal stories in my writing and this article is a great reminder/motivator as to why I should keep adding a personal element to my work.

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9 Qualities of Good Writing

9 Qualities of Good Writing | Reading and Writing | Scoop.it

There are two kinds of people: Those who think they can write, and those who think they can’t. And, very often, both are wrong. The truth is, most of us fall somewhere in the middle. We are all capable of producing good writing....

 

Words matter. Your words (what you say) and style (how you say it) are your most cherished (and undervalued) assets.

 

Yet, so often, they are overlooked. Think of this way: If a visitor came to your website without its branding in place (logo, tagline, and so on), would he or she recognize it as yours? Are you telling your story there from your unique perspective, with a voice and style that’s clearly all you?

 

Here, in no particular order, is what I’ve learned about the necessary qualities of good writing (or content, in our digital vernacular), based on my own 25 years’ working as a writer and editor… and even longer career as a reader....


Via Jeff Domansky
Alex Cowans's insight:

As we continue forward with our research paper, I found this article to be very reassuring. It goes over everything that Professor Vose has talked to us about but in different words. The author makes the reader feel like writing is an accessible skill that anyone can pick up and improve on (which is true). I particularly like her bonus quality at the end of the article: "Good writing has a good editor." because having someone else read your work and ask questions about it truly does bring out the best writing in the following drafts. The author encourages the readers to not just write well, but to write their best.

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Sarah Yarborough's curator insight, March 6, 2014 6:01 PM

I really liked this article about writing. It was very reminicent of almost every article we've read so far, along with the various chapters in They Say, I Say. It talks about how good writers support what they are saying with plenty of data, which is something we all need to make sure of in our research essays. I also like how it says that good writing comes in the rewrite, similar to the idea behind the shitty first draft article. All of these ideas and "secrets" behind how to write successfully are ones we've discussed in class- it's just a matter of actually implementing them into our papers.

Forrest z. Tappan's curator insight, March 11, 2014 8:41 PM

I completely agree with Sarah. This article hold so many compilations to what we have been reading for class, especially in They Say, I say. I have been told many times and have grown accustomed to  believing that for every equation you add to a paper, you loss half of your readers. This is very evident if you look at the more popular articles and book. However it time I veer away from that mind set and start thinking like a research paper writer. This article has giving me some very good tips on how to rethink the way i write for this course. Specifically, Ann--the author-- make  a point that writing should be simple but not simplistic. Being more of a creative writer LOVE to confuse my readers with fancy words and alliteration and what have yous, but Ann stats that this is just not appropriate. I look forward to using what iv learned in my work.

Christopher Philbin's curator insight, August 3, 2014 9:38 PM

Just what makes good writing? These are some key points that will help the novice get on their way to becoming a better writer for sure.

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mckinney-maddalena--i-need-you-to-say-i.pdf

Alex Cowans's insight:

This article is a great example of what Professor Vose has been saying over the past few weeks. The article outlines the importance of the use of "I" in college essays. My favorite metaphor the author used was how jazz musicians must practice strict scales before they improvise. Similarly, the writing students must learn "I"-less writing in order to know how to write objectively. The addition of "I" can be used as a tool to support your argument. The author also provides a list of when using "I" is okay and not okay. This article can really help those students, like myself, who are not quite comfortable with the use of "I" in our writing.

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