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a book lover's den for news, discussions and gossip on books.
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Book looks at forgeries, facts and authorship in the New Testament

Book looks at forgeries, facts and authorship in the New Testament | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
"Bart Ehrman talks a lot about deception in "Forged," his book discussing authorship in biblical literature. But he also engages in some of his own. The book talks about forgeries in the New Testament, the sole focus of his work, but most of the writings he calls forgeries never even made it into sacred Scripture. The subtitle mentions "Writing in the Name of God," but at best Ehrman shows that his forgers wrote in the name of another person, not a divine being.

So what is the purpose of the book? Apparently, it is to shock evangelical, born-again Christians remaining stuck in the fundamentalist theology Ehrman evolved from.

As such, the book is more provocative than insightful."
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Love’s Work by Gillian Rose...a memoir

Love’s Work by Gillian Rose...a memoir | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
This memoir, written by Gillian Rose as she was dying of cancer, sounds like a guaranteed tear-jerker.

Here's an excerpt:

"Love’s Work is at once a memoir and a work of philosophy. Written by the English philosopher Gillian Rose as she was dying of cancer, it is a book about both the fallibility and the endurance of love, love that becomes real and lasting through an ongoing reckoning with its own limitations. Rose looks back on her childhood, the complications of her parents’ divorce and her dyslexia, and her deep and divided feelings about what it means to be Jewish. She tells the stories of several friends also laboring under the sentence of death. From the sometimes conflicting vantage points of her own and her friends’ tales, she seeks to work out (seeks, because the work can never be complete—to be alive means to be incomplete) a distinctive outlook on life, one that will do justice to our yearning both for autonomy and for connection to others. With droll self-knowledge (“I am highly qualified in unhappy love affairs,” Rose writes, “My earliest unhappy love affair was with Roy Rogers”) and with unsettling wisdom (“To live, to love, is to be failed”), Rose has written a beautiful, tender, tough, and intricately wrought survival kit packed with necessary but unanswerable questions."
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In the Garden of Beasts by Eric Larson

In the Garden of Beasts by Eric Larson | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
Erik Larson, author of Devil in the White City, has published a new book, the Garden of Beasts. I really liked the non-fiction narrative, Devin in the White City, although I grew a bit bored with all the architectural passes and preferred the serial killer chapters far more.

Garden of Beasts of beasts is another historical novel. Here's a summary:

"The time is 1933, the place, Berlin, when William E. Dodd becomes America’s first ambassador to Hitler’s Germany in a year that proved to be a turning point in history.

A mild-mannered professor from Chicago, Dodd brings along his wife, son, and flamboyant daughter, Martha. At first Martha is entranced by the parties and pomp, and the handsome young men of the Third Reich with their infectious enthusiasm for restoring Germany to a position of world prominence. Enamored of the “New Germany,” she has one affair after another, including with the suprisingly honorable first chief of the Gestapo, Rudolf Diels. But as evidence of Jewish persecution mounts, confirmed by chilling first-person testimony, her father telegraphs his concerns to a largely indifferent State Department back home. Dodd watches with alarm as Jews are attacked, the press is censored, and drafts of frightening new laws begin to circulate. As that first year unfolds and the shadows deepen, the Dodds experience days full of excitement, intrigue, romance—and ultimately, horror, when a climactic spasm of violence and murder reveals Hitler’s true character and ruthless ambition."

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Quote of the Day: Lewis Carol's pithy pun

Quote of the Day: Lewis Carol's pithy pun | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
"No good fish goes anywhere without a porpoise."

-Lewis Carroll
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Review of The Tiger’s Wife by Téa Obreht, who came to the U.S. at the age of twelve

Review of The Tiger’s Wife by Téa Obreht, who came to the U.S. at the age of twelve | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
"What makes The Tiger’s Wife so special is that it has nothing to do with the typical immigrant memoir or the thinly disguised autobiographical novel. Obreht, who was seven when she left Belgrade in 1992 with her mother and her grandparents to escape the wars in Yugoslavia, and who lived both in Cyprus and in Cairo before coming to the US, writes about events in her homeland that she did not experience firsthand and about a cast of fictional characters. Her novel takes place in an unnamed country in the Balkans, in towns and villages with names that cannot be found on any map and with geography so confusing that even a native of the region will have a hard time trying to guess where some of the key events are taking place. ..."

"Yet it is clear that Obreht is writing about Yugoslavia before and after the wars in the 1990s, which split the country into seven independent states. Once the book is translated in her former homeland, I expect that readers there will be of two min...The Tiger’s Wife intentionally blurs the demarcation between the real and the imaginary. Poised between reality and myth, it uses two separate narrative techniques, that of the novel and that of the folktale, one immersed in historical time, the other sealed off from any particular time."

"One comes to realize that The Tiger’s Wife, with its many different stories, is a novel of immense complexity. First, it is an extended elegy for the narrator’s beloved grandfather, a man with a life story entangled in the fate of the country once known as Yugoslavia, who was able to maintain his compassion and decency in time of ethnic hatred and violence; it is also a lament for all those anonymous men, women, and children made homeless in these cruel and senseless wars. Like the Arabian Nights, it is a book about storytelling and its power to enchant as it wards off death and postpones the inevitable."
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"The Psychopath Test": Madmen among us

"The Psychopath Test": Madmen among us | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
"Jon Ronson is a British journalist who specializes in hanging around with odd people who do odd things...

So it was only a matter of time before Ronson graduated from fraternizing with kooks to rubbing elbows with the officially mad, as he does in his new book, "The Psychopath Test: A Journey Through the Madness Industry." While working on a story about a Swiss psychiatrist who anonymously sent elaborate puzzle books to several scientists, he became interested in how much the insane can affect the lives and behavior of the sane. Naturally, he went right out and purchased a copy of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition, otherwise known as the DSM-IV). A hypochondriacal spiral soon followed. As an antidote, Ronson arranged an interview with an anti-psychiatry Scientologist. The Scientologist in turn introduced him to a man he calls Tony, then imprisoned in Broadmoor, an asylum for the criminally insane.

...That's how "The Psychopath Test" proceeds, with the excitable Ronson pinging wildly back and forth between finding psychopaths everywhere he looks (he's particularly concerned that many political and business leaders might meet the criteria) and questioning the validity of psychiatric diagnosis itself. He interviews "Chainsaw" Al Dunlap, a notorious business executive famed for the relish with which he laid off tens of thousands of workers in the 1980s (a guy who comes across as pretty psychopathic) and a disgraced psychologist whose facile criminal profiling resulted in the incarceration of an innocent man while the real murderer was free to kill again.

What "The Psychopath Test" is not, however, is conclusive; conclusiveness is pretty much the opposite of Ronson's brief in this outing. Much of the time, he leaves the reader remarkably free to draw his or her own conclusions by presenting certain facts while refraining from comment. For those willing to think for themselves, this makes for a refreshing change. There are some who may find Ronson's restraint unsatisfying, but in an age when the worst are filled with the passionate intensity of complete conviction, a little doubt might do us all some good."
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Muscle Memory: The Training of Navy Seals Commandos - New York Times

Muscle Memory: The Training of Navy Seals Commandos - New York Times | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
"They are America’s Jedi knights: the elite of the elite, an all-star team of commandos, “tier one” special operations warriors given mission-impossible assignments in the most dangerous parts of the planet. A week ago, when Seal Team 6 took out public enemy No. 1, Osama bin Laden, Jon Stewart hailed its members as real-life “X-Men,” ABC compared them to Superman, and Newsweek described them as “the coolest guys in the world,” working “anonymously and without public recognition.” Each year, according to the Navy Seals Web site, about 1,000 men start Seals training, and usually about only 200 to 250 succeed. Basic training includes the infamous “hell week”: five and a half days in which candidates sleep only a total of four hours and must run more than 200 miles, and do physical training for more than 20 hours per day. And after years of more training, only a fraction of experienced Seals members go on to join Seal Team 6, a secret unit created after the failed attempt in 1980 to rescue American hostages in Iran and tasked mainly with counterterrorism and counterinsurgency assignments."

"By coincidence there are two new memoirs by former Seals members: “Seal Team Six” by Howard E. Wasdin, a Team 6 member who was seriously wounded in the battle of Mogadishu in 1993; and “The Heart and the Fist” by Eric Greitens, a former Rhodes scholar who joined the Navy Seals in 2001 (and who was not a member of Seal Team 6). Although the two volumes could not be more different in tone — Mr. Wasdin’s narrative is visceral and as action packed as a Tom Clancy thriller; Mr. Greitens’s is more philosophical and big picture oriented — both are coming-of-age stories that, like earlier Seals books, recount the ordeal of basic underwater demolition training in grueling detail."

"Just as important as the tactical lessons in specific skills (like sniper surveillance, sentry removal, intelligence gathering), both authors emphasize, are practice, teamwork and stress and endurance training, which help equip members of the Seals with the emotional ability to manage fear and the muscle memory and instinct to grapple with any sort of contingency and physical threat."
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10 Favorite Historical Fiction Novels

10 Favorite Historical Fiction Novels | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
I've read a lot of good fiction that could be categorized as "historical fiction." But in compiling my top ten list, I chose to adhere to a stricter definition of "historical fiction:" novels in which the historical backdrop figures so prominently it could be considered a main character. The plot of such novels include factual (or factually-based) events that result in a history lesson for the reader.

So with that explanation, here is a list of top ten favorite historical fiction novels I've read:

1. Exodus by Leon Uris
Setting: 1930's-1950's, America and Israel
Storyline: Story about the founding of Israel featuring an American nurse and an Israeli freedom fighter
More info: http://bit.ly/kfVQGn

2. Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
Setting: Georgia and Atlanta during the American Civil War and Reconstruction
Storyline: Story features the famous Scarlett O'Hara, the daughter of a Southern plantation owner, her struggles to adapt to a changing society and her tumultuous romance with the dashing Rhett Butler
More info: http://bit.ly/l0SFew

3. The Journeyer by Gary Jennings
Setting: 1271-1295, Venice, the Silk Road (China), the Middle East, Persia
Storyline: details Marc Polo’s adventures and all his strange and interesting encounters
More info: http://bit.ly/j0rlWi

4. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
Setting: Kabul, Afghanistan 1963-1981; Freemont, California; Kabul, Afghanistan 2001
Storyline: about childhood friends whose lives change after the Soviet invasion of Afghanstan
More info: http://bit.ly/iqQjJQ

5. Kleopatra by Karen Essex
Setting: 69 BC until twenty-three years later, Egypt
Storyline: About early life of Egypt's infamous queen, Kleopatra, who was highly intelligent, beautiful, a brilliant politician, and the most powerful ruler of her time
More info: http://bit.ly/leOgVX

6. Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry
Setting: begins in 1876, Texas, Montana, Nebraska
Storyline: Story follows two long-time friends and former Texas Rangers and their adventures on horseback across the last lands of the American wilderness
More info: http://bit.ly/mq5x1a

7. The Other Boleyn Girl by Philippa Gregory
Setting: 16th Century England, King Henry VIII’s royal court
Storyline: Based on the life of 16th-century aristocrat Mary Boleyn, who reportedly romanced the King before her sister, Anne, snatched him up
More info: http://bit.ly/jjXhE7

8. The Red Tent by Anita Diamant
Setting: Biblical times (Genesis(, Mesopotamia, Canaan and Egypt
Storyline: The story of Dinah, daughter ofJacob and sister of Joseph, a talented midwife and proto-feminist. Dinah is a minor character in the Bible (Genesis). In this novel, she gives perspective of female life in biblical society
More info: http://bit.ly/j2cmVn

9. Shogun by James Clavell
Setting: late 16th century, Japan
Storyline: About the exploration and exploitation of the Orient by the Portuguese, Dutch, Spanish, and English. Story centers around an English pilot and his love for a Japanese woman
More info: http://bit.ly/iEGEUW

10. Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks
Setting: 17th-century England
Storyline: Recreation of a year in the life of a remote British village decimated by the bubonic plague.
More info: http://bit.ly/kqR1pl
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Recent award-winning books to read

Recent award-winning books to read | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
Summary:

1. “The City and the City” by China Mieville (Named Best Novel of 2010 in the World Fantasy Awards and tied with another book for best novel at the 2010 Hugo Awards)

t tells the tale of a detective working a murder case in a European city where denizens only see what they want to see.

2. “Moon Over Manifest” by Clare Vanderpool (Newberry Medal, for readers grades 5 and up)

Abilene Tucker has already had adventures, having spent a good part of her youth hitching rides on freight trains during the Great Depression with her father. The real adventures...begin after her father leaves her with a friend in his hometown, where mysteries abound and the old ways of doing things are about to change forever.

3. “Mockingbird” by Kathryn Erskine (2010 National Book Award for Young People’s Literature)

Narrated by a fifth-grader who has Asperger’s Syndrome who must overcome, along with her father, the tragic shooting death of her brother.

4. “A Sick Day for Amos McGee” by Phillip C. Stead (2011 Caldecott Medal)

Illustrated book for readers in kindergarten and up tells about the title character who is a zookeeper and his five friends: elephant, tortoise, penguin, rhinoceros and owl.

5. “The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration” by Isabel Wilkerson (2010 National Book Critics Circle Award for General Nonfiction)

Story of one of the greatest geographic movements of people in American history, when in the first half of the 20th century, 6 million African-Americans left the South for the hope and perceived better life in the Northern and Midwestern states. Amid the grand tale, smaller stories of individuals fleeing racism, lynchings and beatings put faces on the phenomenon.
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Oprah's 16 Book Picks

Oprah's 16 Book Picks | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
Frankly, I don't give a damn about Oprah-haters. The lady has won my respect through just her now defunct book club, which inspired millions of people to read. And we all know what reading leads to...insight!

Here are 16 books on Oprah's must-read list for May 2011:

1. Faith By Jennifer Haigh: a woman's half-brother is a priest accused of molestation.

2. Swim Back to Me By Ann Packer: linked short-story collection about ordinary people with ordinary crises and the "poignant way they attempt to right themselves after crushing hits."

3. The Great Night By Chris Adrian: modern-day version of A Midsummer Night's Dream that takes place in San Francisco.

4. Bad Dog (A Love Story) By Martin Kihn: memoir about a recovering alcoholic and his dog.

5. Reading My Father By Alexandra Styron: daughter of Pulitzer-prize winning William Styron recounts what it was like to grow up with her father.

6. History of a Suicide: My Sister's Unfinished Life By Jill Bialosky: memoir by a poet who sets out to understand the shocking death of her sibling.

7. Blood, Bones, and Butter: The Inadvertent Education of a Reluctant Chef By Gabrielle Hamilton: memoir by a world-class chef.

8. My Korean Deli: Risking It All for a Convenience Store By Ben Ryder Howe: true story about an editor who ends up working the night shift behind the counter at his immigrant in-laws' Brooklyn grocery store.

9. The Source of All Things and Tiger, Tiger By Tracy Ross; Margaux Fragoso: both are memoirs about sexual abuse.

10. Little Princes: One Man's Promise to Bring Home the Lost Children of Nepal By Conor Grennan: true story about rescuing displaced kids in Nepal...there's also a romance.

11. The Foremost Good Fortune By Susan Conley: an American mother recounts her struggle to adjust to a new life in Beijing and then later to a medical challenge.

12. Day of Honey: A Memoir of Food, Love, and War By Annia Ciezadlo: intimate portrait of civilian life in war-torn Baghdad and Beirut.

13. A Box of Darkness: The Story of a Marriage By Sally Ryder Brady: a widow looks back on the 47 years of marriage to a man with demons.

14. Townie: A Memoir By Andre Dubus III: memoir about growing up as a youth fighting on the streets and a lifetime of trying to connect with his father.

15. The Memory Palace By Mira Bartók: true story about the author and her sister's upbringing with a schizophrenic mother and how they deal with the relationship in their adulthood.

16. The Winter of Our Disconnect By Susan Maushart: one family forgoes digital devices for six months.
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Cool Literature-themed iPhone Cases

Cool Literature-themed iPhone Cases | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
These cases are super cool and super nerdy at the same time! Who's getting one?

Details:

"Cases are now available on Out of Print’s website for $35 each. For each item sold, Out of Print will donate one book to a school or community in need through its partner Books For Africa."

Website: http://www.outofprintclothing.com
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Julian Barnes Finds The 'Pulse' Of Heartache in New Book of Short Stories via @NPR

Julian Barnes Finds The 'Pulse' Of Heartache in New Book of Short Stories via @NPR | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
"...In Pulse...Barnes' main focus is on love and intimacy — how it starts, and what accounts for its endurance or failure to thrive. Many of his characters suffer the loss of one of their five senses, or of a close relationship...

Several stories involve 30-something men rebounding from heartache and venturing into new relationships. "East Wind" packs a wallop, as a divorced estate agent sabotages a promising affair by snooping into the painful past that his new girlfriend was trying to escape. In "Trespass," a methodical hiker notes all the time one saves by being single — "extra time in which to be lonely."

A different sort of heartache is at the center of the powerful "Marriage Lines," in which a man who has lost his wife to sudden illness — much as Barnes lost his wife, literary agent Pat Kavanaugh, to brain cancer in 2008 — travels back to where they vacationed happily in the Hebrides, and realizes, "he was not in charge of grief. Grief was in charge of him."
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Art Print of the Day: "In The Library" by Tatsuro Kiuchi

Art Print of the Day: "In The Library" by Tatsuro Kiuchi | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
I love this print...and it's for sale on a really cool site that was just recommended to me: http://www.20x200.com.
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Quote of the Day: Frederick Douglass on struggle and progress

Quote of the Day: Frederick Douglass on struggle and progress | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
"If there is no struggle, there is no progress."

--Frederick Douglass, American abolitionist, author and orator
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The Last Town on Earth by Thomas Mullen

The Last Town on Earth by Thomas Mullen | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
The Last Town on Earth by Thomas Mullen sounds like another tasty work of historical fiction. I love it when authors re-imagine smaller historical incidents.

Here's a summary excerpt:

"Set against the backdrop of one of the most virulent epidemics that America ever experienced–the 1918 flu epidemic–Thomas Mullen’s powerful, sweeping first novel is a tale of morality in a time of upheaval.

Deep in the mist-shrouded forests of the Pacific Northwest is a small mill town called Commonwealth, conceived as a haven for workers weary of exploitation. For Philip Worthy, the adopted son of the town’s founder, it is a haven in another sense–as the first place in his life he’s had a loving family to call his own.

And yet, the ideals that define this outpost are being threatened from all sides. A world war is raging, and with the fear of spies rampant, the loyalty of all Americans is coming under scrutiny. Meanwhile, another shadow has fallen across the region in the form of a deadly illness striking down vast swaths of surrounding communities.

When Commonwealth votes to quarantine itself against contagion, guards are posted at the single road leading in and out of town, and Philip Worthy is among them. He will be unlucky enough to be on duty when a cold, hungry, tired–and apparently ill–soldier presents himself at the town’s doorstep begging for sanctuary. The encounter that ensues, and the shots that are fired, will have deafening reverberations throughout Commonwealth, escalating until every human value–love, patriotism, community, family, friendship–not to mention the town’s very survival, is imperiled.

Inspired by a little-known historical footnote regarding towns that quarantined themselves during the 1918 epidemic, The Last Town on Earth is a remarkably moving and accomplished debut."
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Infographic Of The Day: The Lord Of The Rings Trilogy, Plotted | Co.Design

Infographic Of The Day: The Lord Of The Rings Trilogy, Plotted | Co.Design | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
I'm in heaven! If you're a Tokien fan, you just check out this infographic. It depicts a minute-by-minute plotting of the various scenes and parallel plots in Peter Jackson's film adaptation.
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What Disabled Children Teach Us

What Disabled Children Teach Us | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
"At night, Ian Brown’s 8-year-old son, Walker, grunts as he repeatedly punches himself in the head and ears.

His face is distorted, with an over-large brow, sloping eyes and a thick lower lip. He cannot speak. He cannot eat solid food, and takes in formula through a tube from a feedbag powered by a pump. The tube runs through a hole in his sleeper into a valve in his belly. When Walker’s own punches begin to awaken him, his father must disconnect the tube and lift the 45-pound boy out of his crib, carry him down three flights of stairs and try to coax him back to sleep. He also must change Walker’s ballooning diaper, as the boy is not toilet trained, and prevent him from smearing excrement every­where. He then feeds him a bottle and tiny doses of Pablum. The kitchen is covered with the film of Pablum dust. Brown’s tasks are performed as quietly as possible so as not to disturb his wife, Johanna, and Walker’s older sister, Hayley. In the first eight years of Walker’s life, neither parent slept two uninterrupted nights in a row.

Brown begins “The Boy in the Moon” this unsparing way because he wants to fling us into his story, alongside him and his family, and because as a writer he knows that an account of the plain facts will bring us to our knees more efficiently than a dressed-up version. Walker (the sad irony of the name) was born with cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFC), a genetic mutation so rare that just over 100 cases have been reported worldwide. Over the course of this book, the truth that Brown learns from his son is also rare — that the life that appears to destroy you is the one you long to embrace. Whatever is human is disabled. Walker is unable to stop bashing himself, and his father is unable to understand him. The boy is likened to the man in the moon, whose face we see though we know it is not there. The face is revealed by our believing in it. As Brown searches for his son’s mind, he finds his own."
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Book for Science Lovers: A Planet of Viruses by Carl Zimmer

Book for Science Lovers: A Planet of Viruses by Carl Zimmer | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
"This fascinating book explores the hidden world of viruses—a world that each of us inhabit. Here Carl Zimmer, popular science writer and author of Discover magazine’s award-winning blog The Loom, presents the latest research on how viruses hold sway over our lives and our biosphere, how viruses helped give rise to the first life-forms, how viruses are producing new diseases, how we can harness viruses for our own ends, and how viruses will continue to control our fate for years to come."
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Jewish Slave Owners No Fiction, Though This Book Is - NPR

Jewish Slave Owners No Fiction, Though This Book Is - NPR | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
"All Things Considered book critic Alan Cheuse has spent more than two decades reviewing other people's work. Now, he's putting himself under the critical microscope with a new novel, Song of Slaves in the Desert.

It's the story — two intertwined stories, really — of a slave-owning Jewish family in South Carolina before the Civil War and a slave girl growing up on their rice plantation...

...prompted Cheuse's decision to research the history of Jewish slave owners. He found they did exist, though in relatively small numbers. "The sad, pathetic truth of the situation is that some of these Jews, the descendants of the people whom Moses led out of the land of bondage, bought into the system," Cheuse says."

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Favoring Immigration if Not the Immigrant

"Susan F. Martin, a historian at Georgetown University, embraces the term even as she warns that it hides more than it reveals. Her book — titled, yes, “A Nation of Immigrants” — argues that the United States historically has favored immigration more consistently than it has immigrants.

Three competing models evolved in the original colonies, she writes, each with a different vision of what purposes newcomers would serve. Elements of each have persisted since.

Virginia sought workers but found them in slaves.

Massachusetts sought believers but punished dissent.

Pennsylvania sought citizens, and built them from foreign stock (despite gripes from residents as cosmopolitan as Benjamin Franklin).

Each model was pro-immigration, Ms. Martin argues, but not necessarily pro-immigrant."
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4 Romantic Books to Disgust and Annoy Your Lover via @Cracked

4 Romantic Books to Disgust and Annoy Your Lover via @Cracked | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
All of the books reviewed are written by a Gregory Mr. Godek. Summary:

#4. Romantic Fantasies & Other Sexy Ways of Expressing Your Love

This book focuses on the sexy side of romance. And since Godek's idea of sexy is puns and massaging his lover while she digests Papa John's, that can really mean anything.

#3. Romantic Dates: Ways to Woo & Wow the One You Love

This book claims to be filled with fun ideas for dates, but most of it is lists of Top 40 love songs. The dating tips aren't even clever enough to be called obvious. If you know what food is and how to get to it, you've already learned everything Godek will ever teach you. However, his stream-of-consciousness style does give primatologists an unprecedented look at monkey brain logic.

#2.Romantic Mischief: The Playful Side of Love

I have a feeling I'm the first person to read this book, and that includes the author. If I could get serious for a second, the thing that bothers me the most about Godek is that I thought the mentally retarded were supposed to be lovable.

#1 The Portable Romantic: An indispensible pocket guide to creating loving relationships

A condensed collection of Godekisms you can carry with you. It's like having an idiot in your pocket that won't shut up about nudity and pizza.
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Quote of the Day: Joan Didion on curing jealousy

Quote of the Day: Joan Didion on curing jealousy | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
"To cure jealousy is to see it for what it is, a dissatisfaction with self."

--Joan Didion, American journalist, essayist and novelist
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David Sedaris Talks Squirrel and Chipmunk

David Sedaris Talks Squirrel and Chipmunk | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
Funnyman writer David Sedaris has a new book out and according to reports, it's another funny one!

But first, a couple of side notes. One, did you know that Sedaris is 54?! He seems perpetually much younger to me. Two, I've read most of his books and while they're all good, nothing comes close to the awesomeness of Me Talk Pretty One Day. And now, more about the new book, “Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk: A Modest Bestiary," a collection of short stories about "animal tales."

(Via Annie Bostrom of Booklist):

"The ancient Greeks had Aesop, seventeenth-century French people read the fables of La Fontaine, and now we, jaded inhabitants of the modern era, possess the distinct privilege to enjoy the beloved Sedaris’ first collection of short animal tales. The appeal of this aesthetically pleasing little volume is inherent, as the American ambassador of the comedy memoir, human division, turns now to creatures of the hoofed and winged variety to make us laugh and, perhaps, learn a lesson. Illustrations by Falconer (of the Olivia children’s books) are a perfect pairing for Sedaris’ stories (both writer and illustrator have been published extensively in the New Yorker). In Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk, foibled fabular heroines are given the opportunity to, finally, display all those humanlike thoughts and behaviors they’ve been banned from for ages. There’s the motherless bear who alienates herself with her incessant, self-centered solicitations of pity, and the potbellied pig who, no matter the diet, just can’t lose his breed-inherited descriptor. It’s impossible to imagine the brainstorm that conjured up these absurd, animated tales, but readers will certainly be grateful that they rained from Sedaris’ pen. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Sedaris’ name creates its own buzz and will continue to do so even with this quirky little book."



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Pat the Zombie: A Cruel (Adult) Spoof >> funny book for adults, not children

Pat the Zombie: A Cruel (Adult) Spoof

~ Aaron Ximm (author)More about this product
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Amazon editorial excerpt:

"A macabre mash-up of the children’s classic Pat the Bunny and the present-day zombie phenomenon, with the tactile features of the original book revoltingly re-imagined for an adult audience.

In the hemorrhagic vein of other zombie parodies, Pat the Zombie presents trusting toddler Judy playing peek-a-boo with a putrefying Paul. Grownup fans of Pat the Bunny (seven million of them) will find their favorite touch-and-feel features disturbingly re-created: Judy reaches for Zombie’s decaying jaw instead of daddy’s cheek; Paul caresses Mummy’s empty eye socket instead of her wedding ring. Ximm’s twisted wit, Soofi’s sick artistic sensibility, and clever packaging that mimics the original book will bring the undead lurchingly to life in this camp popculture romp."
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Article on Steinbeck's Travels With Charley & a journalist who questions whether the memoir was actually fiction

Article on Steinbeck's Travels With Charley & a journalist who questions whether the memoir was actually fiction | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
I confess that not only have I not read John Steinbeck's memoir, Travels With Charley, but I haven't read most of his books. The only exception, in fact: The Pearl. I'm a little ashamed of that as someone who declares herself a bibliophile. Sigh. But hopefully life is long and I will have plenty more time to enjoy classics that sound well worth the read.

The linked article above recaps some of the loveliness of Travels with Charley, Steinbeck's memoir about his road trip across America accompanied by his French poodle, Charley. Wonderful quotes are included, such as this one: “We do not take a trip...a trip takes us.”

However, according to the article, a journalist "named Bill Steigerwald" who "set out to commemorate the journey by falling [Steinbeck's] wheel tracks and write a book on how America has changed.. contends that Steinbeck was not predominantly alone during the journey but was joined by his wife, that he did not sleep in the camper under the stars too often but in motels and even luxury hotels and that several of the encounters he writes about, including the charming one with the thespian, actually never happened."

Apparently, Steigerwald did a lot of research. Anyway, I'm not sure if the whole argument really matters to me. Do you care whether there is some extent of fiction in memoirs?
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