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Read Ye, Read Ye
a book lover's den for news, discussions and gossip on books.
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Jennifer Egan, Siddhartha Mukherjee and Kay Ryan win writing Pulitzer Prizes | Jacket Copy | Los Angeles Times

Jennifer Egan, Siddhartha Mukherjee and Kay Ryan win writing Pulitzer Prizes | Jacket Copy | Los Angeles Times | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
Wow. Wow. Wow. 2010 Pulitzer Prize winners have been announced! My first reaction was one of disappointment because Jonathan Franzen's book Freedom was not even a finalist. But that little wrinkle aside, Pulitzer Prize winners are always fun to read -- I like or love most of the Pulitzer Prize fiction I have read.

Click on the headline to view the complete list of winners. Here's an excerpt on the Fiction category:

"Jennifer Egan's "A Visit from the Goon Squad" has won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for fiction, it was announced Monday. "A Visit From the Goon Squad" was cited by the Pulitzer committee cited for being "an inventive investigation of growing up and growing old in the digital age, displaying a big-hearted curiosity about cultural change at warp speed." The book, Egan's fifth, is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction and is a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize.

Fiction finalists:

"The Privileges," by Jonathan Dee (Random House), a contemporary, wide-ranging tale about an elite Manhattan family, moral bankruptcy and the long reach of wealth

"The Surrendered," by Chang-rae Lee (Riverhead Books), a haunting and often heartbreaking epic whose characters explore the deep reverberations of love, devotion and war."
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Flavorwire » Portraits of Authors in Their Own Words

Flavorwire » Portraits of Authors in Their Own Words | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
These cool portraits depict famous writers with the lines of their faces crafted from the words of their own works!
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E-book sales make history in the US, top paperback books in sales

E-book sales make history in the US, top paperback books in sales | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
If there's anyone out there still doubting the future of e-books, doubt no more. "The Association of American Publishers (AAP)...report shows that in February, e-book sales in the United States were the top selling format in all publishing categories for the first time ever."

I think it's only the beginning of the rising sales trend in e-books.

Although I consider myself to be a geek gadget, I have yet to cross the chasm into e-books. Sure, they don't take up as much space and are easier to travel with, but I actually love the sight of books on their shelves against the walls of my apartment. The one thing about e-books that will eventually compel me to cross the chasm is the availability of graphics -- like the ones you see in children's e-books today. I think there's going to be a trend in similar graphics for adult novels. That will definitely enhance the experience of reading.
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Fatale by Jean-Patrick Manchette | New York Review Books

Fatale by Jean-Patrick Manchette | New York Review Books | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
This crime-fiction novel sounds juicy with suspense, drama, and blood.

"Whether you call her a coldhearted grifter or the soul of modern capitalism, there’s no question that Aimée is a killer and a more than professional one. Now she’s set her eyes on a backwater burg—where, while posing as an innocent (albeit drop-dead gorgeous) newcomer to town, she means to sniff out old grudges and engineer new opportunities, deftly playing different people and different interests against each other the better, as always, to make a killing. But then something snaps: the master manipulator falls prey to a pure and wayward passion.

Aimée has become the avenging angel of her own nihilism, exacting the destruction of a whole society of destroyers. An unholy original, Jean-Patrick Manchette transformed the modern detective novel into a weapon of gleeful satire and anarchic fun. In Fatale he mixes equal measures of farce, mayhem, and madness to prepare a rare literary cocktail that packs a devastating punch."
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The Three Christs of Ypsilanti by Milton Rokeach | New York Review Books

The Three Christs of Ypsilanti by Milton Rokeach | New York Review Books | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
Either this reviewer is extremely persuasive or the reviewed book is really as fascinating as it sounds...or both! Guess there's just one way to find out: read it.

Excerpt:

"On July 1, 1959, at Ypsilanti State Hospital in Michigan, the social psychologist Milton Rokeach brought together three paranoid schizophrenics: Clyde Benson, an elderly farmer and alcoholic; Joseph Cassel, a failed writer who was institutionalized after increasingly violent behavior toward his family; and Leon Gabor, a college dropout and veteran of World War II.

The men had one thing in common: each believed himself to be Jesus Christ. Their extraordinary meeting and the two years they spent in one another’s company serve as the basis for an investigation into the nature of human identity, belief, and delusion that is poignant, amusing, and at times disturbing. Displaying the sympathy and subtlety of a gifted novelist, Rokeach draws us into the lives of three troubled and profoundly different men who find themselves “confronted with the ultimate contradiction conceivable for human beings: more than one person claiming the same identity.”"
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‘This Life Is in Your Hands’ by Melissa Coleman - Review

‘This Life Is in Your Hands’ by Melissa Coleman - Review | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
This memoir by Melissa Coleman looks very intriguing, especially given the New York Times' description of a suspenseful element to the book. [Note: you must have a paid subscription to read the NYT's article.]

Here's an excerpt about This Life is in Your Hands:

"Melissa Coleman was born in 1969 to parents who were hippie pioneers. In 1968 they had moved to Cape Rosier, Me., to start an organic farm and devote every waking hour to its upkeep...Their goals reflected Thoreau’s determination “to live so sturdily and Spartan-like as to put to rout all that was not life.”

Even if “This Life Is in Your Hands: One Dream, Sixty Acres, and a Family Undone” did not have a subtitle that refers to a damaged family, the expectation of trouble in paradise would be inevitable.

...But the Colemans did not face an ordinary set of domestic problems, and that’s a big part of this book’s intense readability. Ms. Coleman, a freelance writer, overworks the foreshadowing and omen-dropping, but she manages to weave a lot of real suspense into the question of what type of destruction is in the offing.."
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Shirley MacLaine’s New Book Declares I’m Over All That | Video Gaming Pros

Shirley MacLaine’s New Book Declares I’m Over All That | Video Gaming Pros | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
"Shirley MacLaine's new book I'm Over That: And Other Confessions gives us a new and interesting view into the beloved movie star's inner thoughts...

...provides an entertaining and colorful look at all of the things that Shirley is over throughout her life, and also some things that she is not over. She goes on to address things that she is almost over, simply can’t get over despite her efforts, and even some stuff she is under. She challenges her readers to consider whether people collectively as a society will successfully ‘get over’ some significant stuff as well.

...is making no bones about what she is and isn’t over, as some of the chapter titles demonstrate, such as ‘people who repeat themselves,’ ‘ill-mannered young people,’ and ‘getting older in Hollywood.’ Some things that Shirley is definitely not over are ‘good lighting,’ gorgeous co-stars,’ and ‘performing live.’"
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Flavorwire » Design Porn: Accessories for Bookworms

Flavorwire » Design Porn: Accessories for Bookworms | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
Hello Bookworms! Check out these cute accessories for expressing your love of books! I like the feather quill necklace for anybody wondering what to get me for my upcoming birthday! ;)
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Thus Spake the Pronoun >> New Gender Neutral Bible

Thus Spake the Pronoun >> New Gender Neutral Bible | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
:Among the most bemoaned weaknesses of the English language is its lack of a gender-neutral single-person pronoun—a drawback to which writers have devoted a great deal of ink over the centuries...

...The recently updated New International Version is not the first edition to attempt to render the Bible more inclusive, but it is by far the most influential."
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Ian Fleming and Agatha Christie lead list of UK's top-earning crimewriters

Ian Fleming and Agatha Christie lead list of UK's top-earning crimewriters | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
"Ian Fleming, creator of James Bond, has beaten Agatha Christie to the title of most successful – and highest earning – British crime writer of all time.

The first crime writers rich list, prepared for the crime drama digital TV channel Alibi, is based on recorded sales, box office returns, licence fees and company accounts. It reveals that many dead writers, including Fleming and Christie, live on as flourishing brands.

It puts Fleming in first place at more than £100m, with more than 100m copies of the Bond books sold worldwide. Christie comes a close second at £100m exactly, including ticket sales from The Mousetrap, the longest running stage play in the world, a fixture in London's West End since 1952.

But both were beaten hands down by the American writers John Grisham, at $600m (£366m), and Dan Brown, at $400m."
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James Jones’s ‘From Here to Eternity’ Is Uncensored

James Jones’s ‘From Here to Eternity’ Is Uncensored | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
New York Times excerpt:

"When the classic novel “From Here to Eternity” was published in 1951, a few things were gone that had been in the original manuscript: explicit mentions of gay sex and a number of four-letter words.

The author, James Jones, objected to the changes at the time, arguing in a letter to his editor at Scribner that “the things we change in this book for propriety’s sake will in five years, or ten years, come in someone else’s book anyway.” But eventually he gave in to his publisher.

Sixty years later Mr. Jones’s estate has made a deal to reissue a digital version of the book that restores those cuts. The book is still in print.

“It’s been on my mind for quite a few years, and the right moment just hadn’t come up yet,” Kaylie Jones, Mr. Jones’s daughter, said in a telephone interview. “My father fought bitterly to hold on to every four-letter word in the manuscript. The publisher was concerned about getting through the censors.”

The novel follows a group of soldiers at an Army post in Hawaii a few months before the attack on Pearl Harbor. Mr. Jones, who died in 1977, drew from his own Army experiences on Oahu for the novel, which won the National Book Award and is frequently cited as one of the best American novels of the 20th century. "
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Murdered Russian journalist's collection of articles published in a book (NYTimes review)

Murdered Russian journalist's collection of articles published in a book (NYTimes review) | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
"A collection of articles about the dark side of Vladimir V. Putin’s reign that the Russian journalist Anna Politkovskaya wrote in the years before her assassination is now available in a book, IS JOURNALISM WORTH DYING FOR? And boy, the writing details atrocities not for the faint of heart.

Anna Politkovskaya, a human rights activist who sought to expose the crimes of the Putin administration, was murdered by an unknown gunman in 2006 in Moscow. She was 48. The mother of two earned international acclaim for her coverage of the Chechen conflict. Her columns in the Novaya gazeta, a newspaper openly critical of the Putin regime, had a wide readership among Russians. The journalist has also published several books.

This collection of articles, as described in the New York Times, sounds very evocative with a no-holds barred account of some horrific experiences.

Excerpt:

"Ms. Politkovskaya’s dispatches from Chechnya begin with four words: “These are appalling stories.” She viewed the war as genocide. She documented mass executions, as well as rapes, scalpings, men and women burned alive, crushed testicles, electric shock, fingers crushed in door jambs. When she notes that one torturer’s methods were “so brutal and pathological that I will not describe” them, you can hardly imagine how startling those things might be, because she’s held little back. "
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Kate Bush Has Permission to Use Words of James Joyce via @NYTimes

Kate Bush Has Permission to Use Words of James Joyce via @NYTimes | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
How do you bookworms out there feel about singers/songwriters getting permission to use quotes from a book? I think it's marvelous -- granted they credit the writer -- because it further immortalizes a writer's words. Plus, it's really cool when different art forms intersect and weave in other mediums into the artistic expression.

P.S. Unless you have a paid subscription to the New York Times, you won't be able to read the linked article in the headlines.
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Trepidations Aside, ‘On the Road’ Becomes a Movie at Last

Trepidations Aside, ‘On the Road’ Becomes a Movie at Last | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
Jack Kerouac’s classic novel about the Beat generation is going to be made into a movie! This is one of my all-time favorite novels, so they better not screw up the movie. Apparently, "Twilight" star Kristen Stewart will be the female lead. The film is scheduled for release this Fall.



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A ‘Good Book,’ Absent God - NYT's Review [the Bible - re-imagined]

A ‘Good Book,’ Absent God - NYT's Review [the Bible - re-imagined] | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
There may be many Christians who will resent the premise of this book, but it sounds like The Good Book: A Humanist Bible takes a very intriguing intellectual approach to re-imagining the most influential book of all time.

The author, English philosopher A. C. Grayling (who spent 30 years compiling “The Good Book"), points out that the editors of the Hebrew Bible "took the legends of their Jewish forebears and wove them into one compelling, if digressive, narrative...in making their Bible of religious sources, its editors had implicitly renounced an entire humanist tradition, of the Greeks, the Romans, the Chinese and others, some of which was available to them."

It's true! I wonder how a very well-versed Christian would explain these gaps.

Author Grayling (who sounds like an atheist) imagines that "if things had gone a bit differently, we might have inherited a very different Bible. A better one..."

I hope this book isn't too dense because it is really something I'd like to read...maybe when I'm retired and have a ton of time on my hands. One day...

One more excerpt:

"“I noticed there is quite a contrast between those philosophies that derive from religious inspiration and those that derive from a humanist perspective, like Plato and Aristotle, Buddhism, Confucius, etc.,” said Mr. Grayling, who this month is touring the United States, speaking about and selling his bible.

“When you contrast those philosophies with the great young religions — Judaism and Christianity date from only two and three thousand years ago — I saw the humanist-derived ethical outlooks tended to take their start from the most generous view of human nature, and the belief that human life is very short, and we must understand how to make good lives for ourselves,” he said in an interview. “Whereas religious systems premise themselves on relationships between man and deity.”

That focus on the deity, Mr. Grayling believes, distracts from seeking the good life in the short time we are allotted."
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50 Most Influential Books of the Last 50 (or so) Years

50 Most Influential Books of the Last 50 (or so) Years | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
My Scoop.it friend, axelletess, is always so good at spotting these gems of articles. Thank you!

This is a very interesting list because it lists books of fiction and nonfiction that are considered to be "most influential. The listmaker, editors at SuperScholar, defined their criteria as follows:

"Not all the books on this list are “great.” The criterion for inclusion was not greatness but INFLUENCE. All the books on this list have been enormously influential.

...Because influence tends to be measured in years rather than months, it’s much easier to put older books (published in the 60s and 70s) on such a list than more recent books (published in the last decade). Older books have had more time to prove themselves. Selecting the more recent books required more guesswork, betting on which would prove influential in the long run.

We also tried to keep a balance between books that everyone buys and hardly anyone reads versus books that, though not widely bought and read, are deeply transformative. The Grateful Dead and Frank Zappa never sold as many records as some of the “one-hit wonders,” but their music has transformed the industry. Influence and popularity sometimes don’t go together. We’ve tried to reflect this in our list."

Below are the books I've read from this 50 best list. I've included my agreement/disagreement for the book's inclusion in this "most influential" list.

- "Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code (2003), an entertaining thriller, has been enormously influential in getting people to think that Jesus is not who Christians say he is and that Christianity is all a conspiracy." [Baochi: okay, I understand the point the editors are making in reinforcing the novel's key theme, but did this theme really influence that many people about a possible Christian conspiracy? I know a lot of people that read this novel, and I didn't hear them saying that this "theme" got them thinking about such a conspiracy. I disagree with this selection.]

- "Stephen Covey’s Seven Habits of Highly Successful People (1989) set the standard for books on leadership and effectiveness in business." [Baochi: I agree with this choice. This book did set a standard for business books and perhaps even a trend in such books.]

- "Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird (1960) served as prelude to the civil rights advances of the 1960s by portraying race relations from a fresh vantage—the vantage of an innocent child untainted by surrounding racism and bigotry." [Baochi: totally agree with this choice.]

- "Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967), as an example magical realism, epitomizes the renaissance in Latin American literature." [Baochi: totally agree with this choice. This novel also set a trend in the popularity of the magical realism genre of fiction.'

- "Toni Morrison’s novel Beloved (1987) provides a profound and moving reflection on the impact of American slavery." [Baochi: I mainly agree with this novel and the reason why it was chosen. I think a far more effective example, though, is Morrison's Song of Solomon, especially given it's the bigger masterpiece.]

- "J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter Series (seven volumes, 1997-2007), loved by children, panned by many literary critics, has nonetheless set the standard for contemporary children’s literature." [I agree with this choice. This series also encouraged scores of children to read -- always a bonus. But I do have to say that this series is nowhere the masterpiece of Tolkien's Lord of the Rings -- Tolkien's work is just hard to read and therefore less available to the masses.]

Looks like I've only read six out of the fifty books. By that definition, I haven't read many "influential" books. Titles I think should've been included on this list:

- The Professor and the Madman by Simon Winchester. Barnes and Noble synopsis here: http://bit.ly/eRyG6l. Influential because it was the first popular book about the making of the Oxford English Dictionary, giving readers a personal look into two very intriguing people who were major contributors to a reference book that has been the de facto standard for definitions of words in the English language. It's a nonfiction book that includes so many juicy details that it reads like a juicy novel.

- Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness by William Styron. Barnes and Noble synopsis here: http://bit.ly/dYZ5nn. This firsthand account of depression by a Pultizer-prize winning author was the first of its kind because it fearlessly described the experience of depression to a public that at the time was largely hush-hush about the prevalent disorder.

- His Dark Materials trilogy by Phillip Pullman. Barnes and Noble synopsis here:http://bit.ly/exmu8O. In this day and age of free thinking and suspicion of religion, there are still very few people who outright say they are atheist. Pullman is one of those. In this fantasy trilogy -- religion, Christianity, and purportedly C.S. Lewis' religion children series Chronicles of Narnia -- are all called into question and challenged.


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The Pumpkin Eater by Penelope Mortimer | New York Review Books

The Pumpkin Eater by Penelope Mortimer | New York Review Books | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
Anyone in the middle of a life crisis? This novel might be good commiseration therapy.

Excerpt:

"The Pumpkin Eater is a surreal black comedy about the wages of adulthood and the pitfalls of parenthood. A nameless woman speaks, at first from the precarious perch of a therapist’s couch, and her smart, wry, confiding, immensely sympathetic voice immediately captures and holds our attention. She is the mother of a vast, swelling brood of children, also nameless, and the wife of a successful screenwriter, Jake Armitage. The Armitages live in the city, but they are building a great glass tower in the country in which to settle down and live happily ever after. But could that dream be nothing more than a sentimental delusion? At the edges of vision the spectral children come and go, while our heroine, alert to the countless gradations of depression and the innumerable forms of betrayal, tries to make sense of it all: doctors, husbands, movie stars, bodies, grocery lists, nursery rhymes, messes, aging parents, memories, dreams, and breakdowns. How to pull it all together? Perhaps you start by falling apart."
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Now Reading | 'American Fashion Travel'

Now Reading | 'American Fashion Travel' | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
What are the travel preferences of the rich and famous? This book tells all.
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10 Most Frequently Challenged Library Books of 2010 - GalleyCat

10 Most Frequently Challenged Library Books of 2010 - GalleyCat | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
1. And Tango Makes Three by Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson
Reasons: Homosexuality, Religious Viewpoint, Unsuited to Age Group

2. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
Reasons: Offensive language, Racism, Sex Education, Sexually Explicit, Unsuited to Age Group, Violence

3. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
Reasons: Insensitivity, Offensive Language, Racism, Sexually Explicit

4. Crank by Ellen Hopkins
Reasons: Drugs, Offensive Language, Sexually Explicit

5. The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
Reasons: Sexually Explicit, Unsuited to Age Group, Violence

6. Lush by Natasha Friend
Reasons: Drugs, Offensive Language, Sexually Explicit, Unsuited to Age Group

7. What My Mother Doesn’t Know by Sonya Sones
Reasons: Sexism, Sexually Explicit, Unsuited to Age Group

8. Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By In America by Barbara Ehrenreich
Reasons: Drugs, Inaccurate, Offensive Language, Political Viewpoint, Religious Viewpoint

9. Revolutionary Voices edited by Amy Sonnie
Reasons: Homosexuality, Sexually Explicit

10. Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
Reasons: Religious Viewpoint, Violence
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Award-winning Sherman Alexie novel among challenged books - Arts & Entertainment - CBC News

Award-winning Sherman Alexie novel among challenged books - Arts & Entertainment - CBC News | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
For clarification, the "challenged books list" is "based on the number of requests libraries get to remove a book from their shelves."

"[Sherman] Alexie's 2007 novel [The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian] — about a bullied teenager who is estranged both from the rich white kids at his high school and his fellow Indians on the Spokane Reservation — is the second most challenged book, cited for language, racism and sexual content."
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Americans Want to Toss Adorable Gay Penguin Tale on Banned-Book Pyre | Fast Company

Americans Want to Toss Adorable Gay Penguin Tale on Banned-Book Pyre | Fast Company | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
"As a taxpaying American citizen, you are entitled to write your local public or school library and formally request that they remove a book from their shelves. They don't have to listen to you, but they often report these requests to the American Library Association, which publishes an annual list of the books that got the most people up in arms. And apparently, people don't want their children reading about gay penguins.

And Tango Makes Three, the heartwarming true tale of two male penguins in the Central Park Zoo that adopt an abandoned egg and then raise the baby penguin, is the book that is most often challenged by parents for its positive depictions of gay (avian) lifestyles. And school districts around the country have removed it from their shelves in response to many of those challenges."
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10 great places to take a library tour - USATODAY.com

10 great places to take a library tour - USATODAY.com | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
What's your favorite library in the world?

Here is USA Today's list:

1. Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, New York Public Library

2. Fayetteville Public Library, Fayetteville, Ark.

3. Seattle Central Library, Seattle

4. Geisel Library, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, Calif.

5. Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, Washington

6. Weippe Public Library, Weippe, Idaho

7. Harold Washington Library Center, Chicago Public Library, Chicago

8. Boston Athenaeum, Boston

9. Deadwood Public Library, Deadwood, S.D.

10. Central Denver Public Library, Denver
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One of the oldest printed books in the world discoverd in Sandy

One of the oldest printed books in the world discoverd in Sandy | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
Wow, this is so amazing -- I'd love to get my hands on this book (wearing gloves, of course).

"Rare book dealer Ken Sanders says he has heard it all. When someone came in to tell him he had a rare and valuable item he said "I'm kind of rolling my eyes and thinking yea, right buddy. I've heard that story before."

The anonymous owner pulled out a copy of the Nuremberg Chronicles published in 1493 it is one of the oldest printed books in the world. That's when Sanders knew he had wrongly judged the man's claim."

The book is valued at $100,000.
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College, who needs it? Professor X writes book about the irelevance -- for some people -- of a college degree

College, who needs it? Professor X writes book about the irelevance -- for some people -- of a college degree | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
The New York Times review on this book is accessible via the linked headline, but a paid subscription is required.

Here are excerpts from the review on In the Basement of the Ivory Tower, written under the pseudonym Professor X -- "a poorly paid adjunct professor, a man who teaches nighttime literature classes in both a small private college and in a community college."

"The tone of his essay, and of this impertinent book, however, is as plaintive as it is lemony. The author is delivering unhappy news, and he knows it. It’s as if he’s proposing to paste an asterisk on the American dream. “Telling someone that college is not right for him seems harsh and classist, vaguely Dickensian,” Professor X writes, “as though we were sentencing him to a life in the coal mines.”

Yet why is it so important to Barack Obama (a champion of community colleges) and those doing America’s hiring, he asks, that “our bank tellers be college educated, and our medical billing techs, our county tax clerks”? College — even community college — drives many young people into debt. Many others lack rudimentary study skills or any scholarly inclination. They want to get on with their lives, not be forced to analyze the meter in “King Lear” in night school in order to become a cop or a nurse’s aide.

In marshaling his persuasive arguments, Professor X draws on the work of scholars and sociologists and demographers, and clearly he’s picking up on sentiments floating in the air. Matthew B. Crawford’s best-selling book “Shop Class as Soulcraft,” published in 2009, was an ode to vocational training and dignified blue-collar work."
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Les Murray [unoffical national poet of Australia] and the Poetry of Depression via @NYTimes

Les Murray [unoffical national poet of Australia] and the Poetry of Depression via @NYTimes | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
The Australian poet Les Murray, whose poems exhibit a "signature" anger, has written a book on his struggles with depression. According to the linked NY Times article, Murray's book is half "prose memoir" and the other half comprises "24 poems written over the course of his life that deal squarely either with his depression or with the subterranean anger that he believes led to it. It’s a pungent, forthright primer in what depression can look like — and surely will make many suffering from the disease feel less alone with it. It also lifts the curtain on the stagecraft of poetry and offers a fascinating behind-the-scenes tour, elucidating just what the special abilities of poetry are."

Note, you need a paid subscription to the New York Times in order to access the linked article.
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