Read Ye, Read Ye
Follow
Find
7.5K views | +0 today
Read Ye, Read Ye
a book lover's den for news, discussions and gossip on books.
Curated by Baochi
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

Authors Talking Smack About Each Other

Authors Talking Smack About Each Other | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
It doesn't surprise me whatsoever that writers, with their moody and competitive temperaments, don't always get along à la Hemingway and his gang of expats in Paris. Seems like I often read inter...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

Me Talk Pretty One Day is a Laugh a Minute

Me Talk Pretty One Day is a Laugh a Minute | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
Me talk Pretty One Day is a series of autobiographical vignettes. Each chapter is individually titled and reads somewhat like a short story. But unlike a typical collection of short stories, Me Tal...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

Ten Places You Can Drink Like Your Favorite Writer

Ten Places You Can Drink Like Your Favorite Writer | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
Ever wanted to drink like Hemingway? Stephanie Yoder lists some of the most literary bars in the world, and gives cocktail recommendations so you can drink like your favorite author.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

Pulitzer-Prize Fiction I’ve Read and Rated

Pulitzer-Prize Fiction I’ve Read and Rated | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
Sometime over the last decade, I set the goal to read every Pulitzer Prize winner in Fiction. To date, I've read twenty-one of the eighty-five Pulitzer winners in Fiction, which means I have sixty-...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

10 Novels Written During the 1800s That Are Well Worth the Read

10 Novels Written During the 1800s That Are Well Worth the Read | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
I gravitate towards contemporary literature. But I did read plenty of non-contemporary books in college and grad school, and I still pick one up now and then. I don't get through every one of those...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

10 Books I’ll Consider Reading When I Retire

10 Books I’ll Consider Reading When I Retire | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
It's been almost fifteen years since I've studied in an academic program with required reading, and yet I still keep a list of books I feel I should read. I intend to try most of the books on that ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

Dear Book Lover: Classic Family Sagas via @WSJ

Dear Book Lover: Classic Family Sagas via @WSJ | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
Cynthia Crossen recommends books that track multiple generations, including from Jeffrey Eugenides, Jonathan Evison, Edmund de Waal and Kate Atkinson.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

Quote of the Day: Anna Quindlen on figuring out who you are

Quote of the Day: Anna Quindlen on figuring out who you are | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
"Figuring out who you are is the whole point of the human experience."

--Anna Quindlen, American journalist and author

But what if you never discover the answer before you die?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

Fiction review: Caleb's Crossing

Fiction review: Caleb's Crossing | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
I've read two Geraldine Brooks books and LOVED Year of Wonders. However, I had a hard time with March, which won the Pulitzer for Fiction. Brooks' new book, Caleb's Crossing, looks promising.

"Sometimes, a historical novel about one era or place is best told by someone from another.

And that's the case with "Caleb's Crossing," in which Geraldine Brooks, an Australian-born, Pulitzer Prize winning writer, brings us this powerful glimpse of early American life, which begins on the beautiful island of Martha's Vineyard, Mass.

The tale begins with the fateful meeting of Bethia Mayfield, a Puritan girl, and Caleb, the son of a Wampanoag chief. Both children share a rebellious nature and a fascination with knowledge and alien cultures. Their journey takes them from the island to Cambridge, and the school that will be known as Harvard, where both will face difficult choices and confrontations in a world not of their making."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

Looking for Sex? Get in the Kitchen

Looking for Sex? Get in the Kitchen | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
We all know men need extra training. ;)

"To show your lady love how just how much you care, get her fresh flowers, pour her a glass of wine, and serve her Miso Horny Cod. So says Spencer Walker, author of “Cook To Bang: The Lay Cook’s Guide to Getting Laid” (St. Martin’s Press)."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

10 Reasons Why True Blood Is Better Than the Books It's Based On - TV.com

10 Reasons Why True Blood Is Better Than the Books It's Based On - TV.com | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
It's rare for movies to be better than books they are based on, but this article is claiming that True Blood as a show is much better than the books the show is based on. I have yet to read the books so if you have, do you agree with this article?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

The Submerged Cathedral Is A Reminder That I’m Just Not Into Romantic Novels

The Submerged Cathedral Is A Reminder That I’m Just Not Into Romantic Novels | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
Set me as a seal on your heart, for love is stronger than death.

- The Submerged Cathedral by Charlotte Wood
As you can guess from the above quote, The Submerged Cathedral is a romantic novel....
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

The Kitchen Boy Provides An Alternative View of The Romanovs

The Kitchen Boy Provides An Alternative View of The Romanovs | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
I know very little about Russian history (unless you count Dostoyevsky and Tolstoy as Russian historians) so I was excited to read this short historically-based novel about the last days of the Rom...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

The Tattooed Girl Is An Intense Premise But Unfulfilling Story

The Tattooed Girl Is An Intense Premise But Unfulfilling Story | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
Joyce Carol Oates is a prolific writer, which is delightful to me and other fans of her work. I've read most of her books, and I've really enjoyed most of those reads -- I even love a few of them....
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

My Favorite Excerpts From Gilead by Marilynne Robinson

My Favorite Excerpts From Gilead by Marilynne Robinson | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
A few years ago, I bought a used copy of Marilynne Robinson's Gilead because it won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2005 and I aim to read most -- if not all -- Pulitzer Prize Fiction winners thr...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

Books I’ve Read

This is an attempted list of books I've read. Before now, I've never even attempted to track the titles I've read. Then I realized that reading might be the most prolific "accomplishment" of my lif...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

10 Classic Books I Don’t Recommend

10 Classic Books I Don’t Recommend | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
Mark Twain once said, "A classic is a book which people praise and don't read.”

In a similar vein, my definition of a classic book is one that high school teachers and college professors inexp...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

Book Lover: New Releases for September

Book Lover: New Releases for September | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
Notable new books for the coming month from Aravind Adiga, Thomas Mullen and Anna Funder.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

Quote of the Day: Oscar Wilde

Quote of the Day: Oscar Wilde | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
"No great artist ever sees things as they really are. If he did he would cease to be an artist. ”

— Oscar Wilde
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

Quote of the Day: on happy moments and old age

Quote of the Day: on happy moments and old age | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
"Cherish all your happy moments; they make a fine cushion for old age."

--Booth Tarkington, American novelist and dramatist
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

The Epidemic of Mental Illness: Why? by Marcia Angell | The New York Review of Books

The Epidemic of Mental Illness: Why? by Marcia Angell | The New York Review of Books | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
"The tally of those who are so disabled by mental disorders that they qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) increased nearly two and a half times between 1987 and 2007—from one in 184 Americans to one in seventy-six. For children, the rise is even more startling—a thirty-five-fold increase in the same two decades. Mental illness is now the leading cause of disability in children, well ahead of physical disabilities like cerebral palsy or Down syndrome, for which the federal programs were created."

"A large survey of randomly selected adults, sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and conducted between 2001 and 2003, found that an astonishing 46 percent met criteria established by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) for having had at least one mental illness within four broad categories at some time in their lives. "

"Nowadays treatment by medical doctors nearly always means psychoactive drugs, that is, drugs that affect the mental state. In fact, most psychiatrists treat only with drugs, and refer patients to psychologists or social workers if they believe psychotherapy is also warranted. The shift from “talk therapy” to drugs as the dominant mode of treatment coincides with the emergence over the past four decades of the theory that mental illness is caused primarily by chemical imbalances in the brain that can be corrected by specific drugs."

"What is going on here? Is the prevalence of mental illness really that high and still climbing? Particularly if these disorders are biologically determined and not a result of environmental influences, is it plausible to suppose that such an increase is real? Or are we learning to recognize and diagnose mental disorders that were always there? On the other hand, are we simply expanding the criteria for mental illness so that nearly everyone has one? And what about the drugs that are now the mainstay of treatment? Do they work? If they do, shouldn’t we expect the prevalence of mental illness to be declining, not rising?

These are the questions, among others, that concern the authors of the three provocative books under review here. They come at the questions from different backgrounds—Irving Kirsch is a psychologist at the University of Hull in the UK, Robert Whitaker a journalist and previously the author of a history of the treatment of mental illness called Mad in America (2001), and Daniel Carlat a psychiatrist who practices in a Boston suburb and publishes a newsletter and blog about his profession."





more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

Flavorwire » Take a Dip: Literary Greats In Their Bathing Suits

Flavorwire » Take a Dip: Literary Greats In Their Bathing Suits | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
Do writers look sexy in bathing suits? See for yourself with these photos of literary greats clad in the itsy bitsy!
more...
rougier marie's comment, July 18, 2011 9:49 PM
Really iconoclast !
Scooped by Baochi
Scoop.it!

Eva Gabrielsson: The woman behind the man who wrote 'The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo'

Eva Gabrielsson: The woman behind the man who wrote 'The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo' | Read Ye, Read Ye | Scoop.it
Who's read the Girl With the Dragon Tattoo series? I read all three, and really enjoyed them. Anyway, the author died at age 50 and his longtime girlfriend has written a book about their 32 years together. Currently, there's a big battle between the girlfriend and Larron's father and brother over the sizeable estate. Here's an excerpt:

"Swedish author Stieg Larsson hit big -- really big -- with his crime novels "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo," "The Girl Who Played With Fire" and "The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets' Nest." Sadly, he didn't live to see his books find the massive international audience that they eventually did -- he died of a heart attack at age 50 in 2004.

Even sadder is that his literary success has led to wrestling over his estate between his family and his longtime companion, architect and author Eva Gabrielsson, who was with Larsson for 32 years. They never married; Larsson feared his political writings might make him a target.

Gabrielsson explains that and more in her new book, "'There Are Things I Want You to Know' About Stieg Larsson and Me,"
more...
CGS Library's curator insight, July 29, 2014 12:58 AM

A sad story of the dissension about Stieg Larsson's estate