Raspberry Pi
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Raspberry Pi
A complete ARM GNU/Linux computer for $25.
(also covering Arduino and BeagleBone)
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Monitor Data From Anywhere With Arduino & the Adafruit FONA - Open Home Automation

In some situations, you could want to monitor a project remotely, and we all know that’s quite easy to do using an Arduino board & an Internet connection. However, a WiFi or Ethernet connection is not always available, for example in a secondary home in the countryside, or a mountain cabin. This is where this project comes into play: in this article, you are going to learn how to send measurement data via GPRS (cellular data), using the Adafruit FONA shield & Arduino. This way, you’ll be able to monitor projects remotely even if no Internet connection is available. Let’s start! Hardware & Software Requirements We are first going to see what components are required for this project. Of course, you’ll need an Arduino board. I used an Arduino Uno board here. The most important component of this project is of course the GSM/GPS shield. I used an Adafruit FONA 808 breakout board for this project: This is a very convenient piece of hardware as it integrates everything you need for your projects: a GSM/GPRS chip, as well as a GPS receiver. Note that in some countries, the plan is to stop the GPRS/GSM network in the future. In that case, you could perfectly use the 3G version of this board, which would work just as well for this project. Then, you’ll need a SIM card, in the ‘classic’ SIM card format. If you only have a micro or nano SIM card, you’ll need to use an adapter. Also, make sure that the SIM card is activated with at least some data available. For this project, I used a very cheap prepaid SIM card with about 10 MB of credit available on the card. You will also need a GSM/GPRS antenna, and a GPS antenna, that you can also get from Adafruit. I also used a simple DHT11 sensor for this project. As the shield is taking a lot of power, it needs an external battery to function properly. For that, I used a standard 3.7V LiPo battery with a JST connector. Finally, you will a breadboard and some jumper wires to make the required connections. This is the list of all the components that I used for this project: Arduino Uno Adafruit Fona 808 breakout + GSM uFL antenna + GPS antenna DHT11 sensor GSM SIM card with GPRS data available 3.7V LiPo battery LiPo battery charger Breadboard Jumper wires On the software side, you will need to have the latest version of the Arduino IDE, which you can find at: https://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/Software You will also need the latest version of the Adafruit FONA library, which you can get using the library manager inside the Arduino IDE. Hardware Configuration We are now going to assemble the hardware of this project. We’ll set up the breakout board, and then assemble it to the Arduino board. The first step is to open up the FONA board so you can insert the SIM card. Then, simply insert the SIM inside the board and close the tray again. After that, put the GPRS antenna and the GPS antenna on the board. We are now going to connect the FONA board to the Arduino board. First, place the FONA board on the breadboard. Then, connect the different pins of the FONA board as follows: Vio connects to 5V of the Arduino board GND connects to GND Key connects to GND as well RX connects to digital 2 of the Arduino board TX connects to digital 3 of the Arduino board RST connects to digital pin 4 of the Arduino board For the DHT11 sensor, connect the first pin of the sensor to VCC of the Arduino board, the second pin to pin 7 of the Arduino board, and finally the last pin of the sensor to GND. Once that’s done, this is how it should look like: Finally, before moving on to the next section, make sure to connect the battery to the FONA board. Logging Data Online We are now going to use the GPRS connection to log data online, using a service called Dweet.io. Then, we’ll even use a website to display this data graphically. Of course, this assumes that you have a mobile Internet access where the project will be located. But that’s perfect to monitor data in a location where there is mobile Internet, but where you don’t want to install a regular Internet access. As the code is quite complex, I’ll only highlight the most important parts, but you can of course find the complete code on the GitHub repository of the project. First, we need to define a ‘thing’ name on Dweet.io, which is a virtual object that will hold all the measurement data: String yourThing = "8g62og"; Then, we activate the GPRS module on the board: if (!fona.enableGPRS(false)) Serial.println(F("Failed to turn off")); delay(1000); if (!fona.enableGPRS(true)) Serial.println(F("Failed to turn on")); delay(1000); After that, in the loop() function of the sketch, we send the measured data to Dweet.io, by making a GET request to the server: uint16_t statuscode; int16_t length; String url = "http://dweet.io/dweet/for/"; url += yourThing; url += "?temperature="; url += String(temperature); url += "&humidity="; url += String(humidity); char buf[80]; url.toCharArray(buf, url.length()); Serial.print("Request: "); Serial.println(buf); We also read back the answer and display it inside the Serial monitor. We also wait for one minute before sending data again: if (!fona.HTTP_GET_start(buf, &statuscode, (uint16_t *)&length)) { Serial.println("Failed!"); } while (length > 0) { while (fona.available()) { char c = fona.read(); Serial.write(c); length--; } } fona.HTTP_GET_end(); // Wait delay(60 * 1000); It’s now time to test the project! Grab the code the GitHub repository of the project at: https://github.com/openhomeautomation/monitor-data-arduino-fona Make sure to change the name of the ‘thing’ inside the code. Then, upload the code to the board, and open the Serial monitor. You should see the following inside the Serial monitor: If you can see this ‘succeeded’ message, it means the data was correctly uploaded to the server. You can now check it by going to the following URL: https://dweet.io/get/latest/dweet/for/my-thing-name You will get the last measurement inside your web browser: This means that you are now able to log data from your project, without a WiFi or Ethernet connection! Monitor Data From Anywhere But you can do more than that: we are now going to see how to display this data graphically. To do so, we’ll use a platform called Freeboard.io. This platform allows you to create free online dashboards for your projects, and interfaces nicely with Dweet.io. First, create a free account at: http://freeboard.io/ Now, create a new dashboard, and create a new source inside this dashboard with the following parameters: Of course, you need to insert your own thing name here. After that, you should see the source inside your dashboard, and when it was last updated: Now, we’ll create a widget to display the temperature. Create a new Pane, and inside this a new Gauge widget with the following data: Now, create the same for the humidity data. This should be the final result: Congratulations, you can now log data using your FONA board, and also monitor this data graphically from anywhere in the world! You can of course now adapt this project and build your own monitoring projects with it. You can for example log the data coming from several different boards to Dweet.io, and monitor all the data within a single dashboard. With that, you can monitor data in several location that don’t have a WiFi or Ethernet access. If you want to learn more about building similar projects with Arduino & the FONA board, I recommend checking the book that I wrote on the topic: GSM & GPS Projects With Arduino.
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ATtiny85 no FTDI ? ? ?

ATtiny85 no FTDI ? ? ? | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Domino60, that picture that you showed us is not ATtiny85 that's a Digispark's USB development board based on ATTiny85 chip. I believe it comes with bootloader (maybe V-USB based, I have no idea) that enables flashing it via USB and special config files for Arduino IDE. If you want to use bare ATtiny85 chip in your project it's best if you update it via ISP. Also FTDI relies on serial (UART) ports of ATmega328p. Attiny doesn't have any hardware UART ports...
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how the device works, features, and coding languages (Wired UK) | Information Society

how the device works, features, and coding languages (Wired UK) | Information Society | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
The BBC has finally started deliveries of its micro:bit pocket sized computers to school children around the country, months later than originally planned. Micro:bit is a small codeable computer that is aimed to encourage pupils to learn basic programming skills. The device is a modern take on the BBC Micro, which was used by millions of school children in the 1980s. The corporation originally intended to give micro:bit to all Year 7 school children — aged 11 or 12 — when they started school in September, but the rollout of the device was pushed back due to design and manufacturing issues. The BBC says that all one million pupils will receive their devices in the coming weeks. In the package that students and their teachers will receive will be a micro:bit, USB, cable and a battery holder. As well as 25 on-board LEDS the device has two programmable buttons, which the BBC says can be used to “control games or pause and skip songs on a playlist”. A ‘compass’ built onto the card is able to detect the direction it is moving in and can be coupled with data from the micro:bit’s accelerometer. There are three input/output pins on the bottom of the device and it also comes with Bluetooth Low Energy, to allow communication with external machines. The BBC says that those with a smartphone will be able to send code directly from the phone to the micro:bit. After the rollout of the device the BBC says the hardware and “much of” the software will be open-sourced and available to buy from retailers. The micro:bit’s retail price is unknown currently, but it may be in line with the Raspberry Pi Zero. The £4 hardware from Raspberry Pi was launched in January and sold all 100,000 initial units within days of its launch. Microbit.co.uk has tutorials for teachers and students touching on basic JavaScript, Microsoft Block Editor, Microsoft Touch Develop, and Python. These allow children to learn more about the programming languages, create projects or watch a number of videos showing how the system works. “The BBC micro:bit has the potential to be a seminal piece of British innovation, helping this generation to be the coders, programmers and digital pioneers of the future” BBC director-general Tony Hall said, as the devices were launched.
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Raspberry Pi 3: Raspbian Linux and NOOBS Distributions Updated | Linux.com

New releases of Raspbian GNU/Linux and the NOOBS installer package appeared on the Raspberry Pi Downloads page last week. These have come very soon after the initial Pi 3 support releases, so they appear to be primarily aimed at bug fixes and enhancements for the new hardware. The Raspbian release notes mention that there are firmware and kernel updates. I couldn't find any release notes or other information about the NOOBS release; hopefully that will come along soon. I have loaded and briefly tested both Raspbian and NOOBS on all of my various Raspberry Pi systems. The best news of this release is that the NOOBS installer now recognizes the Raspberry Pi 3 built-in wireless network adapter, so it is now possible to install from NOOBS on a Raspberry Pi 3 without having to use a wired network connection or a second wireless adapter.   Read more at ZDNet News
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How to get started with the BBC Micro Bit

How to get started with the BBC Micro Bit | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
There seems to be an influx of devices claiming that they will change the future of Computing education. From the Arduino to the Raspberry Pi we now have a plethora of choices when it comes to getting started with physical computing. But in late 2014 there was a rumour that the BBC were keen to emulate the success of the UK's 1980s coding scene, which was led by the BBC Micro, their own micro computer. In 2011 there were a number of reports from Education advisers and Members of Parliament that the UK was now falling behind in Computer Science and that many children believed that the roles on offer meant relocating to another country. This was prevalent in the gaming industry, where the UK maintains sixth position, but with a decline in the number of developers originating from the UK. So in 2015 when the BBC announced that they would be partnering with a number of hardware, software and service suppliers to deliver a single board micro-controller powered platform, the Education sector stood up and listened. The goal of the micro:bit project was not to introduce just another single board computer or micro-controller, rather the goal is to disrupt. Put a device into the hands of children and teachers that has zero cost but maximum impact. The micro:bit is designed to work with mobile devices to spur classroom creativity, and with the micro:bit anyone can make their own smart device with very little code. Supported by the BBC and a number of service providers, the micro:bit has projects and documentation that has been designed to fit into the UK Computing curriculum. The hope of all the project partners is to rekindle the successes of the 1980s and help children to learn how rewarding Computer Science can be, with aims to generating new job roles in the future. Getting Started with Micro Python For this project you will need to connect your micro:bit to a Linux machine or Raspberry Pi. You'll also need an LED, 220 Ohm Resistor (RED-RED-BROWN-GOLD) and three Crocodile clips. In physical computing the "Hello World" introduction is traditionally to control an LED (Light Emitting Diode). This helps to test that the board and components are working correctly before we progress to something more challenging. We begin by downloading the Python software known as Mu. Ensure that you have the latest version of the software for your OS. You will need to make the downloaded file executable, in most Linux distros you can right click on the file and select "Properties" and from there make the file executable. If you prefer the terminal then you can do the following: $ chmod +x NAME OF DOWNLOADED FILE Now open the Mu application by double clicking on the downloaded file. The Mu editor looks basic but is constantly being worked on by members of the Python Software Foundation. You can see a row of buttons across the editor; pay particular notice to Flash and Repl. Flash is used to Flash your code on to an attached micro:bit, where as Repl (Read Eval Print Loop) is used to interactively hack with the micro:bit. We shall start our project by writing a few lines of code that will flash an LED on and off with a half second gap between each state. In the top windows we import the entire micro:bit Python library with: from microbit import * Now we create an infinite loop, which will contain the code that we wish to run while True. Inside of the loop, the next line of code is indented, as per Python's requirement to show that this code is inside of the loop. First we change the state of pin 0, which is currently turned off. To turn on the pin we set it to be 1. Then we sleep for half a second, before turning pin 0 off, using 0, then we sleep for half a second to create a seamless loop. You'll notice that we did not import the time library, yet we are using the sleep function. This is because Micro Python has its own sleep function inside of the micro:bit library that uses milliseconds for duration, with 500 equalling half a second. pin0.write_digital(1) sleep(500) pin0.write_digital(0) sleep(500) With the code written, it is time to flash the code on to the attached micro:bit. Click on Flash and wait until the yellow LED on the reverse of the micro:bit stops flashing. With the code loaded on to the micro:bit now we will connect the components. Attach one side of a crocodile clip to pin 0 and the other to the long leg of an LED. Connect another crocodile clip to the GND of the micro:bit and then attach the other end to one leg of a resistor. On the other resistor leg attach another crocodile clip and then attach it to the short leg of the LED. You should now see the LED flash if not, then check your wiring is correct by removing the crocodile clip from pin 0 and attach it to 3V. If the LED lights up then the wiring is correct. Enjoyed this article? Expand your knowledge of Linux, get more from your code, and discover the latest open source developments inside Linux Format. Read our sampler today and take advantage of the offer inside.
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BBC hands out tiny Micro Bit computer to thousands of children in the UK today

BBC hands out tiny Micro Bit computer to thousands of children in the UK today | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Today, the BBC finally hands out the Micro Bit, a small computer designed to encourage programming, to thousands of UK schoolchildren. The eye-catching initiative was announced in July last year, but only now are the tiny computers being sent out - later in the school year than originally planned. The BBC worked with Microsoft, Samsung, ARM and other companies to create the device, which is designed for Year Sevens (11-12-year-olds). The name is a nod to the 1980s BBC Micro computer, and the device is a part of the BBC's 2015 Make it Digital initiative, which is designed to help inspire kids to get into science, technology and engineering. From today up to one million BBC Micro Bits are being delivered free to every year seven student in England and Wales, year eight student in Northern Ireland and S1 student in Scotland. They are the students' devices to own. This allows students to keep their device as they move up through the school. The Micro Bit is 4cm by 5cm and comes in a range of colours. It has red LEDs that light up and two programmable buttons, so it works as a basic game controller. It also works with other devices via Bluetooth, such as the equally little Raspberry Pi. It's meant to be programmed via a website designed by Microsoft, rather than connected to a keyboard and screen. It can be made to flash its LEDs in sequence and take readings from built-in sensors. But when it's added to other hardware it can do much more. One school launched their copy more than 20 miles into the air. Pupils at Rishworth School in West Yorkshire wrote a program that used a heat sensor to log changes in temperature and show the current reading on the computer's LEDs. They then attached the kit to a helium balloon and let it fly upwards. Students from London's Highgate School used the Micro Bit to help people with autism recognise other people's emotional states. They coded the computer so a user could scroll through a series of graphics, shown via the LEDs, of faces presenting different moods. When they found a match they could press another button to make the LEDs state what the image represented - for example "happy", "sad" or "angry". Are you a parent with a child set to receive a BBC Micro Bit? The BBC has set up a website for teachers and parents with guides for getting started and safety tips.
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R-Kade Zero • The gaming controller for the Raspberry Pi Zero!

R-Kade Zero • The gaming controller for the Raspberry Pi Zero! | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
R-Kade Zero is one of the smallest and minimalist gaming controllers around. If you add a tiny Raspberry Pi Zero and a case and you’ve built yourself a tiny video gaming platform. The central idea to this is an interchangeable gaming controller gives the player a choice for their favourite style of play. You can choose from a single joystick and 4 control button experience or go with a two joystick experience as an alternative. There’s even a classic D-Pad design lined up as a stretch goal.
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Apollo Arduino Training Board Created By Ascension Engineering (video) - Geeky Gadgets

Apollo Arduino Training Board Created By Ascension Engineering (video) - Geeky Gadgets | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Those of you that are interested in learning to program, may be interested in a new Arduino compatible training board which has been designed by Ascension Engineering, that has been specifically designed to make learning electronics easy and entertaining. The Apollo Arduino training board comprises of a number of components including three high quality single turn potentiometers, buttons, piezo speaker, light sensor, microSD card, pressure gauge and more. Watch the video below to learn more about the Apollo training board which allows you to learn more about the Arduino IDE and programming microcontrollers to aid in a number of different projects by reacting and displaying data from external sensors and interactions. Whether you are interested in learning to program or control lights in your house, the Apollo is a flexible and fun Arduino-compatible trainer board designed to make electronics easy and useful. We have completed a sample production run with our manufacturing partner. In order to bring the Apollo to market at an excellent price, we need to scale up our production, which requires additional funding. One of the other hurdles is to acquire FCC certification, since all products that include a microcontroller should receive a FCC unintentional radiator compliance certification. If our kickstarter is successful we expect to have the Apollo ready for shipment within 90 days. Simply put, the hardware. The Apollo features many hardware accessories in a clean compact layout with all the libraries and sample code ready to go. Our goal is to make it easy to get started with hardware integration by providing the Apollo in a ready to use state. If the Apollo Arduino training board is something you are interested in jump over to the Kickstarter crowdfunding website to make a pledge from just $65 for super early bird backers and help the Apollo make the jump into production. Source: Kickstarter Filed Under: Concepts & Design, Hardware, Top News Popular Geeky Gadgets Deals
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BBC rolls out Micro Bit computers to 1m UK students for free

BBC rolls out Micro Bit computers to 1m UK students for free | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
After months of delay, the BBC has launched its Micro Bit programmable computer, beginning with about a million of them being delivered for free to every child in year 7 (around 12 years old) across England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. Once they receive their own Micro Bits during this rollout, kids will be able to keep and use them throughout their remaining years at school. It’s part of the BBC’s program to encourage children to learn to code and creative with technology. Our best speaker lineup, ever. This year’s edition of TNW Conference in Amsterdam includes some of the biggest names in tech.Learn more The device will be available to buy from a range of retailers soon after today’s rollout; a price hasn’t been announced yet. The BBC wants to encourage kids to code with its free programmable computer The BBC will open-source the Micro Bit hardware and most of its software. It will also use the money earned from its commercial sales to further encourage as many people as possible to learn to code. To help kids pick up programming skills, the the Micro Bit comes equipped with 25 LEDs, configurable buttons, an accelerometer, compass, Bluetooth, and connections to hook it up to more sensors. It can also work with other similar devices, like Raspberry Pi, Arduino and Kano to build things like fitness trackers and smartwatches. Samsung developed an app that lets you use a smartphone or tablet to code on the Micro Bit. ➤ BBC Micro Bit Featured image credit: BBC
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BBC starts sending free Micro:bit computers to a million UK students

BBC starts sending free Micro:bit computers to a million UK students | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Sebastian Anthony The front of the Micro:bit Starting from this morning, March 22, about a million teachers and students across the UK will begin to receive a free BBC Micro:bit computer. The idea is to get an easily programmable/tinkerable computer into the hands of kids, to get them into techy stuff at a young age—much like the BBC Micro in the 1980s. If you're aged 11 to 12 (year 7 in England and Wales, year 8 in Northern Ireland, and S1 in Scotland), and your school has registered for the Micro:bit program, you should be entitled to a free Micro:bit. Parents and teachers: if you haven't heard of the Micro:bit, or your school hasn't registered, go ahead and sign up. Eventually non-students will be able to buy a Micro:bit for their own DIY purposes, but for now unless you're a teacher, student, or lucky journalist like me, you're probably out of luck. The Micro:bit's eventual commercial pricing is unknown, but it will probably struggle against the £4/$5 Raspberry Pi Zero. A BBC spokesperson told me that they are focusing on delivering one million Micro:bits to students before turning its attention to commercial availability. I would be surprised if you could buy a Micro:bit before the end of the year. Rather than foot the entire bill for a million-odd Micro:bits and build an entire developer framework from scratch, the BBC partnered with a bunch of companies that provided support and sponsorship. Microsoft, for example, supplied the programming languages (Touch Develop and Block Editor); Samsung provided an Android app; NXP provided the USB controller, accelerometer, and magnetometer; Nordic Semiconductor supplied the Bluetooth chip; and Lancaster University designed the Micro:bit's runtime kernel. All told, there are more than 20 companies or institutions that are supporting the Micro:bit in some way. Sebastian Anthony As a journalist, my Micro:bit box contains more goodies than what teachers and students will receive. So, what's in the Micro:bit box? My original plan was to review the Micro:bit—to actually write some code using Microsoft Touch Develop, to see what's in store for our nation's kids. Unfortunately, and rather unsurprisingly given how the Micro:bit has been plagued by delays, the BBC only sent out the Micro:bit on Friday, for a Monday delivery and midnight-Monday embargo. I want to play with the Micro:bit for more than a couple of hours before writing about it. FURTHER READING RASPBERRY PI ZERO SELLS OUT WITHIN 24 HOURS Touts have already started selling the £4 Pi Zero on Ebay for up to £100. A BBC spokesperson confirmed that teachers and students will receive a Micro:bit, a USB cable, and a battery holder. Teachers will also receive a quick start guide (the A4 book pictured in the gallery above) that is 32 pages long and contains enough information to create some basic programs that interact with the Micro:bit's LEDs, buttons, and sensors. Teachers and students are primarily meant to use the Micro:bit website, though, which contains a wealth of information, tutorials, etc. My box contained some other stuff, including crocodile clips, a buzzer, and what appears to be some kind of 3.5mm-to-phono adapter. Many schools will already have a lot of similar bits and pieces laying around that they can use—but if not, there's plenty that can be done with just the Micro:bit and a battery pack. And now, like lots of other kids around the country this morning, I'm off to play with my Micro:bit. I'll hopefully have some hands-on impressions soon. Listing image by Sebastian Anthony
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How the Internet of Things is transforming digital marketing

How the Internet of Things is transforming digital marketing | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Ever heard of John Wanamaker? No? Born in 1838, Wanamaker was a merchant and religious, civic and political figure, and he was considered by some to be one of the first marketing geniuses in American business. A huge proponent of advertising, Wanamaker said: “Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is, I don’t know which half.” Fast-forward nearly 160 years to 1995 and another pivotal moment in history—the first time I got on the Internet, which was through a dial-up modem. Not really knowing what to do on the Internet, I surfed the web, but back then there wasn’t much content. The waves weren’t big, so I turned off my surfboard, or my Compaq desktop, and probably put on a CD or something else 90ish. The magic of Internet ads One thing I’ll always remember about those early Internet days was ad display. Banner ads—later on, pop-up ads—all seemed like billboards along the freeway. There was no data and no ability to establish causation in relation to top-line growth. A couple years later in a college Lit class, a professor instructed us to Google a book written by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe to get clarification on what some obscure passage meant. I actually think I applied for a job with Google that night after realizing how superior the search experience was in comparison with Yahoo. A few years later, a good friend of mine got a job at Google and on the phone one day he explained how Google made its money. He asked me to search for something, and then directed me to click on the square ad on the right side of the results page, and I did. “See, you just made Google money,” said my friend. “Genius,” I thought. Since then, new channels have continued to enter the digital marketing and advertising landscape, in addition to banner ads and a search capability already in place. Soon came YouTube video, and shortly after that came mobile and social computing. Marketers now have a significant variety of channels and platforms to get their messages out, and now hiding from the taxman is easier than avoiding being advertised or marketed to—no matter what you’re doing or where you are. The return on digital advertising Today, significant money is spent on digital advertising, and while estimates vary, possibly more than $120 billion will be spent on digital advertising in 2016. That amount of money is spent because marketers know that doing so is effective; they just can’t tell how effective. Imagine an organization is budgeted to spend $1,000 a year on digital ads. For simplicity’s sake that company earns revenues of $2,000. In theory, you could say marketing produced 100 percent return on investment (ROI) for the organization’s fiscal year marketing budget, which would be a great return. But what if it only spent half that amount? Would it only earn $1,000 in revenues? This scenario offers a basic example, but it illustrates my thesis: the most sophisticated customers and marketing analytics platforms struggle to establish true causality. Many come very close, but marketing spend will always be a correlation to sales, not the reverse. I wonder what John Wannamaker would say now? Correlation is not causation—but it sure helps! The value of behavior Today’s marketers see strong correlations to Google ad buys and increased revenues. That’s why Google is such a powerful company, and its revenues continue to increase after more than 15 years of being in the Internet search business. Google has data on our searches, our YouTube views, our email content, our Global Positioning System (GPS) data and much more. Google can segment its user base, using highly advanced analytical tools that correlate preferences, context and location of an individual and deliver relevant engaging offers. Yet there’s still room for improvement. Improvement is needed because even though an individual may click a text display ad or a search link or a video banner ad, no implicit assurance of how that ad impacted a sale exists. If the ad hadn’t been there, would the sale have happened regardless? With no insight into how or if, marketers remain unsure how much top-line growth they’re contributing to the company, and they remain unsure of the cost of revenue. With banner ads and, for that matter, billboards and television ads, the goal is to simply reach an audience. But in today’s world, companies are trying to promote specific behaviors that represent value to a marketing organization. Facebook likes, shares, tweets, registrations and yelp reviews all represent valuable data to the marketing department, and metrics such as cost per impression are less valuable. Metrics more closely aligned with revenue, such as pay per call, cost per order and cost per lead take a large step forward in articulating correlation and, perhaps in some cases, causality. But room to improve still exists. Marketing organizations of the future, after solving the how-and-the-if challenge, should be able to measure themselves by a simple cost of revenue metric, as in, what does it cost to buy more revenue? The Internet of Things will enable marketers to measure cost of revenue because the data created from connected devices can solve the how and if. But how can it do so? The Internet of Things and caffeine management In the future, and to some extent today, Internet of Things connected devices are connecting themselves to other devices and exchanging data. A wearable device knows how long the person wearing it sleeps and when that person wakes up in the morning. It can communicate that data to the coffee machine, and the act of waking up triggers the coffee to start brewing. In addition, one coffee unit can be subtracted from the personal coffee inventory. A wearable device also knows when its wearer is away on business, and coffee won’t be made if that person is not sleeping at home. The same person’s spouse, who only drinks decaf on Sundays while reading the New York Times on a tablet, has a wearable device that also communicates with the coffee maker. As a result, two coffee types are brewed on Sundays, and two units are subtracted from the home coffee inventory. Coffee deliveries typically take five days to arrive, so 10 days before the coffee runs out, a message from the coffee maker arrives with an ad that says “buy”—no more emails with a repurchase reminder, no more alerts or cookie-based banner ads attempting to grab someone’s attention. And the risk that a person may forget to click a link and make selections no longer exists. Certainly, cross-sell and up-sell communications and additional offers will be made, but sizable segments of marketing budgets will be hypertargeted offers that fuse sales and marketing into an unbroken continuum of ecommerce. That offer may come from someone else, perhaps a food and coffee supplier, and the message may appear on a tablet, a wearable device, in a car or by some other means. It may come in email form, a text, a phone call, an instant message or some other communication channel. The person receiving the message may have set this event up to preorder coffee at the six-days-left period, in which case a message may not come at all—just a receipt. The point is, marketing will have the data and the ability to actually determine the cost of revenue. Now imagine that message comes from a competing brand with an offer to try its coffee, with access to the data and maybe with offers to switch to tea. The more connected the devices are in our lives, the more precise the offers will be, and it seems the precision may be limitless. The causality determination The future of the Internet of Things is one in which the point of sale is everywhere and anywhere. It blends sales, marketing and advertising into an omnichannel, platform-agnostic ecosystem that captures sales conversion metrics and links them to purchase-intent data, establishing causality. Matt Ackley, chief marketing officer (CMO) at Marin Software, calls this future “audience-based marketing.” Kevin Cain, director of content strategy at OpenView Venture Partners, calls it "targeted content." But I think this Forbes blog post comes closest to what I’m saying here by labeling it “integrated marketing.” Essentially, we’re all saying the same thing. By using data and analytics, we can market and advertise by delivering offers to highly defined, hypersegmented audiences and make those advertisements and offers as personal and contextual as possible. The huge advance that isn’t discussed is what the Internet of Things enables, which is the data-driven identification of marketing-to-sales causality, or figuring out true cost of revenue—which is the true Holy Grail of marketing. Now is the time to invest in integrating passive marketing and promotion capabilities into your Internet of Things products and devices. A tsunami of data is crashing down upon the enterprise, and only those who have plans in place to capitalize will make it out the other side. An Internet of Things integration trial Speaking of advertising, do you want something complimentary? Maybe a Raspberry Pi? Want to know what to do with it? Give this IBM Big Data & Analytics blog post by Bret Greenstein a read. It tells you all about how to set it up and start using it to test the IBM Watson Internet of Things platform. Try integrating the platform with a push notification, and send yourself a marketing message every time the Raspberry Pi detects an Internet of Things event. And if you do, send me a pic @peter_ryans or reach me here. Follow @IBMAnalytics
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03 21 2016 RPi Arduino python C FPV AdobeCC EEprojects

03 21 2016 RPi Arduino python C FPV AdobeCC EEprojects Unity3D CanonT6i FPV EEprojects RaspberryPi Arduino python C GoPro tank, inmoov robotics - boring d
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Linux 4.6 To Offer Faster Raspberry Pi 3D Performance - Phoronix

Linux 4.6 To Offer Faster Raspberry Pi 3D Performance - Phoronix | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Broadcom's Eric Anholt sent in the VC4 DRM driver updates today for DRM-Next merging to in turn get into the Linux 4.6 kernel merge window. In the pull request he mentions, "Notably, it includes a significant 3D performance improvement and a fix to HDMI hotplug detection for the Pi2/3." A significant 3D performance improvement for this open-source Raspberry Pi kernel DRM driver that pairs with the VC4 Gallium3D user-space driver is exciting. The better performance is thanks to pipelining binning and rendering jobs. For some x11perf (using GLAMOR over OpenGL) tests the boost is reportedly 20~30% while in some OpenGL games it's much less. "The hardware provides us with separate threads for binning and rendering, and the existing model waits for them both to complete before submitting the next job. Splitting the binning and rendering submissions reduces idle time and gives us approx 20-30% speedup with several x11perf tests," according to the patch's author Varad Gautam.
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PiStorms Challenge

PiStorms Challenge | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
So, you like Raspberry Pi but would prefer to build with LEGO?  No problem!  You can use the Mindsensors PiStorms to add a touch screen, buttons and motor and sensor ports to your Pi.  The designs for the LEGO Technic compatible parts that come with this are completely open source and available for anyone to tweak as they see fit. For those of you with access to a 3D printer (or simply awesome 3D design skills), you can now enter a competition to design your own LEGO Technic compatible frame for the PiStorms. The way it works is as follows, simply fork the GitHub repo with an example frame and start hacking away at it!  So, what can you win?  Why, a PiStorms, of course!  Mindsensors will ship it to anywhere in the world.  The competition ends 15 May 2016. Find out more about this competition by checking out the main page: [LINK].
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Touch sensing | Arduino UNO | Processing 3 | Basic Electronics

Sensing the touch, Amplification, Fintering, Serial port, Drawing
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How to get started with the new BBC micro:bit computer - Pocket-lint

How to get started with the new BBC micro:bit computer - Pocket-lint | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Announced last year, the BBC micro:bit pocket-sized computer is now being delivered to all 11 and 12-year-olds (Year 7) in the UK. The new computer, which many will see as an alternative to the Raspberry Pi, offers kids the chance to play with dedicated hardware and learn coding at home and in the classroom. Teachers have already had a couple of months to play with the kit, but to many school children it will be the first time they've got their hands on one. But where should they start? What resources are available? And, as a parent whose child could be about to bring one home, what can you do to get involved? A number of teachers who have been exploring the BBC micro:bit over the last few months have put together the following top tips to help others get the most out of the device: BBC micro:bit hardware: Understand what you've got The computer board, which enables you to see all the elements exposed, features a processor, compass, accelerometer, USB power port, a Bluetooth antenna and battery port to connect two AAA batteries. Kids can also use the five input and output (I/O) rings to connect up to five crocodile clips via the board to hook it up to other devices. Before you get confused with all the coding elements though, just take some time to have a play with the hardware of the micro:bit. Try getting the lights to light up depending on what you do or how you move the board. BBC micro:bit teachers guide: Use the "Quick Start Guide for Teachers" to get started "Start by working through activities in the Quick Start Guide for Teachers," says Steve Richards, ICT teacher and curriculum team leader at Eastlea Community School. "It's a really great hands-on introduction to the BBC micro:bit." The 32-page guide not only explains in detail what the micro:bit can do, but also gives you a number of tutorials to get you started. And just because it's aimed at teachers and pupils in class shouldn't put you off, the tutorials are just as easy to understand at home as they are in the classroom. Check out the micro:bit website. The Teachers Guide only features three tutorials to get you started but there are plenty of other things you can do with the small computer. The BBC has created a dedicated micro:bit website with stacks of information videos, tutorials, and more to try out.  BBC micro:bit code editors: Get coding with your preferred editor "Kick off with the Block Editor. It’s a great graphical coding environment to use as you introduce students to the BBC micro:bit, before you start using the text-based programming language" says Jane Waite, Computing at School London regional coordinator (CAS London). Nic Hughes, head of computing at Latymer Prep School adds, "There are some really effective lesson plans for the Touch Develop code editor, targeted at all skill levels." There are different coding editors to try: Code Kingdoms JavaScript, Microsoft Block Editor, Microsoft Touch Developer, and Python. You can use the one that will suit different tasks or your ability. The best option is to probably just play around with what feels better for you. Touch Develop is probably best suited for use with a tablet or smartphone, while Python is really aimed at more advanced programmers. BBC micro:bit additional projects: Look at the bigger picture "Look for ways to incorporate the BBC micro:bit into a wider project," says Steve Richards, ICT teacher and curriculum team leader at Eastlea Community School. "Some of our kids used them as a brain for a self-driving car, a controller for a robotic arm and as part of a fitness strap."
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Domotic easy made with raspberry pi

I made a device that make possible control from smartphones or tablets many devices such radio, coffee maker , ligths, etc.
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Raspberry Pi 3 vs BBC Micro Bit: How do the DIY computers compare?

Raspberry Pi 3 vs BBC Micro Bit: How do the DIY computers compare? | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Raspberry Pi or BBC Micro Bit? We see how the microcomputers match up After months of setbacks, the BBC has finally started delivering its free microcomputer to one million UK school children. But how does the BBC Micro Bit compare to the Raspberry Pi 3? Originally planned to begin in October 2015, the BBC's scheme will see every child in year 7 in the UK get their own BBC Micro Bit to help teach them the basics of computing. The project is evidently inspired by the BBC Micro, which did a similar thing for kids in the 1980s. But what exactly can be done with the BBC Micro Bit? And more importantly, how does it stack up to the current microcomputer king, the Raspberry Pi 3? We know that the Micro Bit is an extremely simple, low-grade device aimed at very basic, entry-level use cases. Let's take a closer look at the differences between these two microcomputers. RASPBERRY PI 3 VS BBC MICRO BIT - DESIGN Let's get this right out of the way: the BBC Micro Bit and the Raspberry Pi 3 are completely different devices. In fact, rather than rivalling it, the BBC Micro Bit is intended as a gateway to the likes of the Raspberry Pi 3. To that end, while the Raspberry Pi 3 resembles a rudimentary PC - a board with multiple recognisable connections - the BBC Micro Bit is essentially a 5 x 4cm circuit board with five basic I/O rings for hooking up other devices and even power. Related: What is Raspberry Pi Zero? It also has many of its functions attached directly, such as 25 red LEDs that can be programmed to light up, and two programmable control buttons. It's operating at a much more basic level than the Raspberry Pi 3, and is designed to interact with other devices rather than acting as a stand-alone system. RASPBERRY PI 3 VS BBC MICRO BIT - POWER Raspberry Pi 3: 1.2GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU and Broadcom Videocore IV GPU, 1GB RAM BBC Micro Bit: 32-bit ARM Cortex M0 CPU, 16KB RAM We don't know about the BBC Micro Bit's specs, but we do know that it runs on an ARM Cortex MO CPU chip, which is the smallest ARM processor available. It's designed to be extremely small and energy efficient, as well as easy to program for. Related: Raspberry Pi 3 vs Raspberry Pi 2 "With just 56 instructions, it is possible to master quickly the entire Cortex-M0 instruction and its C friendly architecture, making development simple and fast," says ARM. More importantly, in terms of this piece, the Micro Bit's chip is significantly less powerful than the Raspberry Pi 3's ARM Cortex-A53 CPU, which is the kind of chip you'd expect to find in entry-level to mid-range smartphones. RASPBERRY PI 3 VS BBC MICRO BIT - CONNECTIVITY Raspberry Pi 3: 4 x USB 2.0, 1 x HDMI, Ethernet, 3.5mm audio jack, 40 GPIO pins, Camera interface, Display interface, MicroSD card slot, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth BBC Micro Bit: 5 x I/O rings, Bluetooth Low Energy, Micro-USB controller, edge connector, compass, accelerometer There's a large difference in connectivity here, as we've already touched upon. Once again, the Raspberry Pi 3, despite being very basic, actually has the recognisable connections of a modern computer. It has an HDMI slot, four USB 2.0 slots, an ethernet port, and a 3.5mm audio jack. It also has Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, something which its predecessor, the Raspberry Pi 2, missed out on. That makes it great for using as a media centre. The BBC Micro Bit has a basic set of five I/O rings, meaning you'll need crocodile clips to physically hook it up to other devices (such as sensors or robots). Related: 6 of the coolest Raspberry Pi projects However, it does feature Bluetooth, so you'll be able to hook up to phones and other devices wirelessly. There's also an accelerometer and a compass, so the BBC Micro Bit can be used for the kind of directional applications or motion-based games you might find on a smartphone (albeit a lot more basic). Interestingly, one whole side of the BBC Micro Bit is a standard edge connector, which means it can be physically plugged into other devices like the Raspberry Pi 3 itself. The Raspberry Pi will then power it, otherwise two AAA batteries will do the trick. RASPBERRY PI 3 VS BBC MICRO BIT - SOFTWARE Raspberry Pi 3: Variety of Debian-based OSs, primarily Raspbian OS, free Windows 10 version BBC Micro Bit: Embedded software platform, web-based interface Raspberry Pi 3 is a full applications processor-based device that runs Linux and Windows 10, while the BBC Micro is an embedded software platform that doesn’t run a full operating system. The Pi even features a web-based UI for editing in JavaScript, Python, C++ and Blocks. Related: Raspberry Pi 2 vs Raspberry Pi The difference is night and day, and really drives home how entry-level the BBC Micro Bit is. It's meant to teach kids the very building blocks of computing, while Raspberry Pi 3's software showcases a more recognisably modern OS. RASPBERRY PI 3 VS BBC MICRO BIT - PRICE Raspberry Pi 3: £30 BBC Micro Bit: Free to year 7 students The Raspberry Pi 3 comes at a stupendously low price of £30, but that's still much more expensive than free, which is what the BBC Micro Bit is for year 7 kids. Of course, most people aren't year 7 kids, and the BBC has confirmed that it will make the Micro Bit available to purchase. Originally the Micro Bit was going to be made available to buy by 'the end of 2015'. Of course, with the delays in getting the product into schools, it remains unclear when the device will be available to buy. There's also no news on a price as yet, but we'd be very surprised if it cost anywhere near as much as the Raspberry Pi 3. EARLY VERDICT As you can see, there really is no comparison between these two devices. If the Raspberry Pi 3 is a 'my first proper computer,' then the BBC Micro Bit teaches the raw building blocks of coding at the heart of it. It's even more fundamental. The Raspberry Pi 3 is a much more advanced and practically useful device, but if you or your kid is starting at the very beginning of your programming journey, the BBC Micro Bit looks hard to beat.
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Arduino Nano Runs Battery Spot Welder

Arduino Nano Runs Battery Spot Welder | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Soldering might look like a tempting and cheap alternative when building or repairing a battery pack, but the heat of the iron could damage the cell, and the resulting connection won’t be as good as a weld. Fortunately, though, a decent spot welder isn’t that tough to build, as [KaeptnBalu] shows us with his Arduino-controlled battery spot welder. When it comes to delivering the high currents necessary for spot welding, the Arduino Nano is not necessarily the first thing that comes to mind. But the need for a precisely controlled welding pulse makes the microcontroller a natural for this build, as long as the current handling is outsourced. In [KaeptnBalu]’s build, he lets an array of beefy MOSFETs on a separate PCB handle the welding current. The high-current wiring is particularly interesting – heavy gauge stranded wire is split in half, formed into a U, tinned, and each leg gets soldered to the MOSFET board. Welding tips are simply solid copper wire, and the whole thing is powered by a car battery, or maybe two if the job needs extra amps. The video below shows the high-quality welds the rig can produce. Spot welders are a favorite on Hackaday, and we’ve seen both simple and complicated builds. This build hits the sweet spot of complexity and functionality, and having one on hand would open up a lot of battery-hacking possibilities. Thanks [Chris Muncy] for the tip.
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PurpleKit Home Robot Construction Kit (video) - Geeky Gadgets

PurpleKit Home Robot Construction Kit (video) - Geeky Gadgets | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Francisco Juretig based in London UK has created a new kit which has been specifically designed to help construct and build home robots and includes all the hardware needed to create a number of different systems and projects depending on what you can think up. The PurpleKit home robot construction kit has been launched on the Kickstarter website with the aim of raising £6,000 to make the jump into production, check out the video below to learn more about what’s included. Juretig explains more about the inspiration for the robot construction kit and what can be created. Once you start discovering the beautiful world of robotics, you will realize that are are plenty of excellent electronic options available. You will probably find proper tools, tons of Arduino/Raspberry modules, and several other excellent electronic kits. The problem appears when you actually want to create “real” things that interact with those electronics. For the beginner, it’s easy to get lost into the thousands of mechanical pieces, servos, motors, aluminium parts and beams available. It’s likely that you will spend a lot of money buying some pieces that are not the proper ones, or that cannot be joined together; and eventually spending a lot of time across the several DIY websites to understand what’s available and what you could do with those pieces. This kit bridges the gap between DIY electronics and mechanics. For example, assume you want to create a robotic arm with your specific customization, or you want to create a fan that swings according to some instructions, or a linear rail to place a camera, or a large enclosure for your Arduino projects. Instead of scavenging through internet, it would be easier to get a kit containing all the stuff that your need. For more information on the new PurpleKit robotics kit jump over to the Kickstarter website for details and to make a pledge via the link below. Source: Kickstarter Filed Under: Gadgets News, Top News Popular Geeky Gadgets Deals
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Raspberry Pi Laptop Pi Top Kit Soon Arriving At Adafruit For $275 - Geeky Gadgets

Raspberry Pi Laptop Pi Top Kit Soon Arriving At Adafruit For $275 - Geeky Gadgets | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
If you have been considering purchasing the new Pi Top Raspberry Pi laptop kit that transforms your Pi mini PC into a fully fledge laptop, you might be interested to know that the kit will soon be available priced at $275 from Adafruit. The open source laptop allows you to build your very own Pi laptop and the kit supports the new Raspberry Pi 3 mini PC which launched just last month providing a considerable boost in performance when compared to older mini PCs in the Pi range. Included in the Pi Top Raspberry Pi laptop kit is the following, although the Raspberry Pi mini PC is not included – Screen – Connect the screen by simply slotting the metal hinge into the base bottom piece. A single cable is plugged into the Pi-Top Hub and away you go! – Base Top – Attach and remove the base top piece by sliding it over the base bottom and pressing down. You will hear a satisfying ‘click’ when you have popped it into place. – Base Bottom – The base bottom contains the battery and modular rail where you will pop in the Hub and Raspberry Pi 2. No wires or tools are required, like a lego laptop you snap everything into place. The Pi-Top smart battery pack is protected by a sheet of brushed stainless steel, so you can be sure your battery is securely in place. – Hub – With over 150 components on this circuit board, the Pi-Top Hub PCB takes care of power management, our screen driver and a host of other functionality which allows us to turn the Raspberry Pi into a great open source laptop. 1x 8GB SD Card with Pi-Top OS For more information on the new Pi Top kit available from the Adafruit store jump over to the  official Adafruit website for details. Source: Adafruit Filed Under: Hardware, Laptops, Top News Popular Geeky Gadgets Deals
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BBC micro:bit learn-to-code device finally rolling out to UK schools

BBC micro:bit learn-to-code device finally rolling out to UK schools | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
A tiny computer intended to encourage UK kids to get programming is finally being delivered to schools, some half a year later than originally planned. The micro:bit was announced a year ago — the brainchild of the UK’s public service broadcaster, the BBC, serving the educational strand of its charter. While it may seem odd for a broadcaster to be dabbling in computing hardware the Corporation has past president here, via the 1980s home computer the BBC Micro. The BBC intends the micro:bit to inspire “a new generation to get creative with coding, programming and digital technology”, in an era when — unlike the 80s — mobile computing devices are plentiful yet most are not designed to encourage DIY coding. (Although the UK as a country punches above its weight here, thanks to the success of the Raspberry Pi microcomputer.) This time last year the BBC said it would be gifting one million Micro Bits to 11-year-old UK schoolkids, in fall 2015. That timeframe has slipped considerably, with the device only now starting to be handed out mid-way through the school term — leading to concerns it may not live up to its educational potential, given that teachers are likely to have created lesson plans for the school year already. The challenge of building hardware by co-ordinating such a large list of partners — the BBC said it had almost 30 partners working with it on developing the micro:bit, including manufacturers, software makers, retailers and educators — is the likely culprit for the delay here. After giving the kit to schoolkids the BBC has said it would be licensing the design, via a non-profit it created for the purpose, to companies wanting to make additional micro:bits. Given the huge success of the Raspberry Pi — which earlier this year announced it had sold five million units in some three years since launch — that’s perhaps not a huge surprise. The market for creative computing devices with educational potential is well proven at this point (and startups have also been getting involved here). Following the schools rollout, the BBC now says the hardware specifications and much of the software for micro:bit will be open-sourced, and the device will be made available to buy from a range of retailers. Money generated from any commercial sales will then be used to “further encourage as many people as possible to join the coding revolution”, as the BBC puts it. The micro:bit board includes a bank of LEDs, a pair of programmable buttons, an accelerometer to detect motion, a compass/magnetometer, Bluetooth connectivity and a selection of input and output rings to link to other devices and sensors — all with the aim of offering a toybox of tech tricks that kids can play around with. The board itself is small enough that it can be incorporated into a wearable design. On the software/coding side, there’s a companion website hosting multiple code editors and tutorials, plus video guides to get kids started.
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We're giving away a Raspberry Pi 3 Ultimate Starter Kit

We're giving away a Raspberry Pi 3 Ultimate Starter Kit | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Between the release of the new Raspberry Pi 3 on March 1 and our Pi Day celebration last week, it's been a big month for fans of the $35 mini computer. To add to the excitement, we're pleased to announce our Raspberry Pi 3 Sweepstakes, where we'll be giving away a Raspberry Pi 3 Ultimate Starter Kit. In addition to the latest and greatest Raspberry Pi computer, the kit ships with lots of fun extras to help get you started, including: Heat sink Full-sized large breadboard High-quality Raspberry Pi case 6.5-foot HDMI cable LEDs, resistors, push button switches, jumper wires, and more Enter to win by March 31 at 11:59 p.m. EDT. All you need to do is complete the official entry form: Enter here. One entry per person. Don't forget to read our official rules to make sure you're eligible. Good luck!
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How the Internet of Things is transforming digital marketing

Ever heard of John Wanamaker? No? Born in 1838, Wanamaker was a merchant and religious, civic and political figure, and he was considered by some to be one of the first marketing geniuses in American business. A huge proponent of advertising, Wanamaker said: “Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is, I don’t know which half.” Fast-forward nearly 160 years to 1995 and another pivotal moment in history—the first time I got on the Internet, which was through a dial-up modem. Not really knowing what to do on the Internet, I surfed the web, but back then there wasn’t much content. The waves weren’t big, so I turned off my surfboard, or my Compaq desktop, and probably put on a CD or something else 90ish. The magic of Internet ads One thing I’ll always remember about those early Internet days was ad display. Banner ads—later on, pop-up ads—all seemed like billboards along the freeway. There was no data and no ability to establish causation in relation to top-line growth. A couple years later in a college Lit class, a professor instructed us to Google a book written by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe to get clarification on what some obscure passage meant. I actually think I applied for a job with Google that night after realizing how superior the search experience was in comparison with Yahoo. A few years later, a good friend of mine got a job at Google and on the phone one day he explained how Google made its money. He asked me to search for something, and then directed me to click on the square ad on the right side of the results page, and I did. “See, you just made Google money,” said my friend. “Genius,” I thought. Since then, new channels have continued to enter the digital marketing and advertising landscape, in addition to banner ads and a search capability already in place. Soon came YouTube video, and shortly after that came mobile and social computing. Marketers now have a significant variety of channels and platforms to get their messages out, and now hiding from the taxman is easier than avoiding being advertised or marketed to—no matter what you’re doing or where you are. The return on digital advertising Today, significant money is spent on digital advertising, and while estimates vary, possibly more than $120 billion will be spent on digital advertising in 2016. That amount of money is spent because marketers know that doing so is effective; they just can’t tell how effective. Imagine an organization is budgeted to spend $1,000 a year on digital ads. For simplicity’s sake that company earns revenues of $2,000. In theory, you could say marketing produced 100 percent return on investment (ROI) for the organization’s fiscal year marketing budget, which would be a great return. But what if it only spent half that amount? Would it only earn $1,000 in revenues? This scenario offers a basic example, but it illustrates my thesis: the most sophisticated customers and marketing analytics platforms struggle to establish true causality. Many come very close, but marketing spend will always be a correlation to sales, not the reverse. I wonder what John Wannamaker would say now? Correlation is not causation—but it sure helps! The value of behavior Today’s marketers see strong correlations to Google ad buys and increased revenues. That’s why Google is such a powerful company, and its revenues continue to increase after more than 15 years of being in the Internet search business. Google has data on our searches, our YouTube views, our email content, our Global Positioning System (GPS) data and much more. Google can segment its user base, using highly advanced analytical tools that correlate preferences, context and location of an individual and deliver relevant engaging offers. Yet there’s still room for improvement. Improvement is needed because even though an individual may click a text display ad or a search link or a video banner ad, no implicit assurance of how that ad impacted a sale exists. If the ad hadn’t been there, would the sale have happened regardless? With no insight into how or if, marketers remain unsure how much top-line growth they’re contributing to the company, and they remain unsure of the cost of revenue. With banner ads and, for that matter, billboards and television ads, the goal is to simply reach an audience. But in today’s world, companies are trying to promote specific behaviors that represent value to a marketing organization. Facebook likes, shares, tweets, registrations and yelp reviews all represent valuable data to the marketing department, and metrics such as cost per impression are less valuable. Metrics more closely aligned with revenue, such as pay per call, cost per order and cost per lead take a large step forward in articulating correlation and, perhaps in some cases, causality. But room to improve still exists. Marketing organizations of the future, after solving the how-and-the-if challenge, should be able to measure themselves by a simple cost of revenue metric, as in, what does it cost to buy more revenue? The Internet of Things will enable marketers to measure cost of revenue because the data created from connected devices can solve the how and if. But how can it do so? The Internet of Things and caffeine management In the future, and to some extent today, Internet of Things connected devices are connecting themselves to other devices and exchanging data. A wearable device knows how long the person wearing it sleeps and when that person wakes up in the morning. It can communicate that data to the coffee machine, and the act of waking up triggers the coffee to start brewing. In addition, one coffee unit can be subtracted from the personal coffee inventory. A wearable device also knows when its wearer is away on business, and coffee won’t be made if that person is not sleeping at home. The same person’s spouse, who only drinks decaf on Sundays while reading the New York Times on a tablet, has a wearable device that also communicates with the coffee maker. As a result, two coffee types are brewed on Sundays, and two units are subtracted from the home coffee inventory. Coffee deliveries typically take five days to arrive, so 10 days before the coffee runs out, a message from the coffee maker arrives with an ad that says “buy”—no more emails with a repurchase reminder, no more alerts or cookie-based banner ads attempting to grab someone’s attention. And the risk that a person may forget to click a link and make selections no longer exists. Certainly, cross-sell and up-sell communications and additional offers will be made, but sizable segments of marketing budgets will be hypertargeted offers that fuse sales and marketing into an unbroken continuum of ecommerce. That offer may come from someone else, perhaps a food and coffee supplier, and the message may appear on a tablet, a wearable device, in a car or by some other means. It may come in email form, a text, a phone call, an instant message or some other communication channel. The person receiving the message may have set this event up to preorder coffee at the six-days-left period, in which case a message may not come at all—just a receipt. The point is, marketing will have the data and the ability to actually determine the cost of revenue. Now imagine that message comes from a competing brand with an offer to try its coffee, with access to the data and maybe with offers to switch to tea. The more connected the devices are in our lives, the more precise the offers will be, and it seems the precision may be limitless. The causality determination The future of the Internet of Things is one in which the point of sale is everywhere and anywhere. It blends sales, marketing and advertising into an omnichannel, platform-agnostic ecosystem that captures sales conversion metrics and links them to purchase-intent data, establishing causality. Matt Ackley, chief marketing officer (CMO) at Marin Software, calls this future “audience-based marketing.” Kevin Cain, director of content strategy at OpenView Venture Partners, calls it "targeted content." But I think this Forbes blog post comes closest to what I’m saying here by labeling it “integrated marketing.” Essentially, we’re all saying the same thing. By using data and analytics, we can market and advertise by delivering offers to highly defined, hypersegmented audiences and make those advertisements and offers as personal and contextual as possible. The huge advance that isn’t discussed is what the Internet of Things enables, which is the data-driven identification of marketing-to-sales causality, or figuring out true cost of revenue—which is the true Holy Grail of marketing. Now is the time to invest in integrating passive marketing and promotion capabilities into your Internet of Things products and devices. A tsunami of data is crashing down upon the enterprise, and only those who have plans in place to capitalize will make it out the other side. An Internet of Things integration trial Speaking of advertising, do you want something complimentary? Maybe a Raspberry Pi? Want to know what to do with it? Give this IBM Big Data & Analytics blog post by Bret Greenstein a read. It tells you all about how to set it up and start using it to test the IBM Watson Internet of Things platform. Try integrating the platform with a push notification, and send yourself a marketing message every time the Raspberry Pi detects an Internet of Things event. And if you do, send me a pic @peter_ryans or reach me here. Follow @IBMAnalytics
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Looking for internet Radio client with level meters

Looking for internet Radio client with level meters | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Hi. I am using a Raspberry Pi as a streaming box (runing darkice). The Pi just streams what it is sent and the levels are set from the thing it is connected to (i.e. mixing desk). I was using Radio Streamer on windows to monitor the levels so I could set them (as it has level meters). I am looking for an internet client for Linux that is similar in that it shows the levels of the stream. This is what Streamer Radio looks like, notice level meters.
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