Raspberry Pi
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Raspberry Pi
A complete ARM GNU/Linux computer for $25.
(also covering Arduino and BeagleBone)
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Arduino Blog – Let’s warm up for Maker Faire Rome 4th edition!

Arduino Blog – Let’s warm up for Maker Faire Rome 4th edition! | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
aims to draw European citizens to the “Maker world” thanks to the aid of Fablabs, Makerspaces, Hackerspaces and the hardware startups environment. The goals of European Maker Week are two folds: create awareness about the importance of the maker culture to foster an education of creativity and innovation in all schools across Europe; build bridges between local authorities and media and the main players of their own local makers ecosystems. It is of particularly importance to reach out to new players (e.g. Schools) who have never organized a maker event before.
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Smart Foosball Keeps Score Using Arduino

Smart Foosball Keeps Score Using Arduino | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Thinkers and makers at Handsome created an automated Foosball Scoreboard using an Android tablet and Arduino Mega 2560: the Arduino is responsible only for detecting a) a goal scored and b) the gate in which it was scored. After a goal is detected the Arduino sends this data to Android tablet. You can explore the details of the project on this blog, the sketch on Github, and watch the video below:
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Atmel SAM D09 Development board | Dangerous Prototypes

Atmel SAM D09 Development board | Dangerous Prototypes | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
The Atmel SAM D series of 32-bit microcontrollers includes several devices, each with a long list of features at great prices. Perhaps the best known of the series in the maker community is the SAM D21 due to its use on the Arduino Zero. However, there are several other devices in the product line that are worth taking a look at. The smallest of the bunch is the SAM D09 that comes in a 14-pin SOIC package. The 14SOIC package is one of my favorites. It is easy to solder, easy to break out on a PCB, and takes up little board space. I decided to order some SAM D09C chips and design a small development board in order to learn more about the capabilities of the device.
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Arduino Based Ambient Lighting #Arduino

Arduino Based Ambient Lighting #Arduino | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
After buying a new TV set, I started missing the Ambilight feature of the previous Philips TV. Doing some research on how to possibly replace it, I’ve had the idea of combining existing components – hardware and software – to create something similar for this purpose. Controlled by an Arduino, a RGB sensor placed in front of the TV picture will detect the color of a particular area of the screen, which will then be used to set the color of an entire NeoPixel strip, resulting in a constantly adapting ambient lighting.
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Arduino / Pi small sensor mounting plate by clifton2

Arduino / Pi small sensor mounting plate by clifton2 | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Summary Fed up with my Arduino sensors wandering across the desk so designed this plate to mount them. Print Settings Printer: Prusa I3 Rafts: No Supports: No Resolution: 0.2mm Infill: 20%
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6 Common Types of Paper to Use for Crafts and Prototyping | Make:

6 Common Types of Paper to Use for Crafts and Prototyping | Make: | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Paper, one of the most familiar, inexpensive, and abundant materials around, is great for arts and crafts. With the right techniques, however, you can also use it for anything from prototyping small models to constructing furniture or even boats and buildings. Here’s how to push the limits of its potential. Types A combination of thickness, stiffness, “tooth” or surface texture, and finish (matte, glossy, or none) can change the way paper holds its shape and how it takes pencil, ink, or glue. Some popular types of paper and their uses include: Copy paper: Medium weight and fairly smooth, it’s good for writing by hand as well as for printing. It’s also stiff enough to stand up if used for small paper models. Art paper: Pricey, thick, and usually somewhat rough, it’s designed for pencil, ink, and paint. Tear it against the grain for nice frayed edges. Cardstock: Stiff, smooth, and thin, it straddles the line between paper and cardboard. Good for greeting cards, paper models, and other stand-up building projects. Construction paper: Soft, rough, and often brightly colored, it’s not as stiff as cardstock but still good for kids’ pop-up cards and other 3D crafts. The best paper for little hands to practice scissor skills. Tissue paper: Thin and brightly colored, use it to create a faux stained glass effect or dampen it and let the colors run for a watercolor effect. Origami paper: Lightweight but stiff, it will hold a sharp crease and even spring back if you compress it when folded. Generally colored or printed on one side only. More choices include ultra absorbent coffee filters (for pseudo tie-dye projects), wax paper (iron two sheets together to “laminate” leaves and other flat objects) and freezer paper (good for stencils, will stick lightly to fabric when ironed). Manipulating Paper Folding and Rolling For nice sharp creases — V-shaped valley folds or hump-backed mountain folds — score your sheet first along the fold line by indenting it with any kind of dull point. For coils and rounded bends, roll it around a toothpick or pencil. Cutting Paper Scissors should have sharp, small, pointy blades. For long straight cuts, use a craft knife or box cutter. Run it lightly along a metal straight edge, making multiple swipes if needed. A desktop programmable vinyl cutter is easy to use for delicate, precise projects, and much less pricey than a laser cutter. Connecting Ordinary white glue is long lasting and secure enough for most needs. Spread it thinly with a flat toothpick, craft stick, or index card, or use a paintbrush or roller. Glue sticks and spray adhesives work instantly but are less permanent. Use binder clips to clamp pieces while you build. Strengthening To make models sturdier, glue multiple layers together, alternating grain if possible. You can build with thin paper and card by bending or rolling it tightly into rods. To make models last longer, reinforce them with clear packing tape or by brushing on clear sealant, epoxy resin, thinned glue, or shellac.
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Atmel SAM D09 Development board - Electronics-Lab

Atmel SAM D09 Development board - Electronics-Lab | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
The Atmel SAM D series of 32-bit microcontrollers includes several devices, each with a long list of features at great prices. Perhaps the best known of the series in the maker community is the SAM D21 due to its use on the Arduino Zero. However, there are several other devices in the product line that are worth taking a look at. The smallest of the bunch is the SAM D09 that comes in a 14-pin SOIC package. The 14SOIC package is one of my favorites. It is easy to solder, easy to break out on a PCB, and takes up little board space. I decided to order some SAM D09C chips and design a small development board in order to learn more about the capabilities of the device.
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Coming Soon – Pi-Top – A Laptop Kit for Raspberry Pi B+ / Pi 2 / Pi 3

Coming Soon – Pi-Top – A Laptop Kit for Raspberry Pi B+ / Pi 2 / Pi 3 | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Check out all the Circuit Playground Episodes! Our new kid’s show and subscribe! Have an amazing project to share? Join the SHOW-AND-TELL every Wednesday night at 7:30pm ET on Google+ Hangouts. Join us every Wednesday night at 8pm ET for Ask an Engineer! Learn resistor values with Mho’s Resistance or get the best electronics calculator for engineers “Circuit Playground” – Adafruit’s Apps!
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Strap a Robot to Your Face! Your Expressions Are Now Controlled by Technology | Make:

Strap a Robot to Your Face! Your Expressions Are Now Controlled by Technology | Make: | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Here’s how to build a set of remote control eyebrows from an old headlamp and a small handful of parts. Two small motors mounted to the headlamp will be attached by thread to your eyebrows for a natural look. Beyond its obvious practicality, this project makes a great introduction to DC motor control, infrared remote control, and moving from working with an Arduino to working with the bare ATMega328 chip. These concepts are combined with some minimal extra circuitry. The end result will be a great conversation piece, that is… if you don’t stab your eye with a toothpick. My implementation supports calibration, independent control of each eyebrow, and a 1- to 9-way waggle feature. Expressions vary from skeptical to shocked to very, very shocked. Because you’ll probably be working with a different remote control than mine, you’ll need to experiment with decoding the buttons and assigning them to functions. Reverse-engineering household junk is a satisfying way to save money and reduce e-waste. You’ll need to be familiar with Arduino-style C code to adapt the supplied source code to suit your own remote control. Step 1: Breadboard the circuit around the Arduino We’ll start by using the Arduino to do some prototyping and testing. We’ll use the ATMega328 controller later, once we’re satisfied that all the pieces are working well together. On a breadboard, wire up the VS838 IR receiver, L293D, motors, etc. to your Arduino using the following diagram: Step 2: Install the IRLib library into your Arduino environment We’ll be using the IRLib library to interact with the VS838 (or equivalent) IR receiver. Install the library into your Arduino environment by following the instructions there. Note that IRLib should be able to recognize the most common remote control protocols, but at least in the case of my Pioneer remote control, it didn’t know how to decode the data. Fortunately the library supports using a “fingerprint” hash from raw data, so button presses can still be reliably detected. This technique should work with recognized protocols as well, so it shouldn’t be necessary to change the code overmuch even if your remote’s protocol is recognized by IRLib. Step 3: Upload the “brows.ino” sketch to the Arduino You’ll find the required Arduino sketch available from this repository. Once the sketch is uploaded to the Arduino, open the serial console and try pressing remote control buttons with the remote facing the IR receiver. You should see hash codes corresponding to unrecognized button presses. (The “brows.ino” sketch sends these to the serial port when it doesn’t recognize them.) Step 4: Hook up the button hashes to the brow functions In the source code for the sketch, you’ll see “case” statements with hash codes for remote control buttons like: case 0xDF604FDC: // Left brow, large up Your remote control will probably have a different number and layout of buttons, so you’ll have to experiment with this to find a good mapping. As you change these hashes, upload the sketch and test whether your motors are working according to the button you press. Step 5: Add the ATMega328 to the breadboard So far we’ve been using the Arduino to run the motors. Let’s add the ATMega328 chip to the breadboard and program it instead. Move the data connections that are currently attached to the Arduino so that they connect to the ATMega328 chip instead, per this diagram: Add the power and ground connections to both sides of the ATMega328 following the diagram. Do not hook up the battery yet. For now we’ll continue to use the Arduino for power. Step 6: Hook up the Arduino to the ATMega328 as a programmer We won’t be using the Arduino to run our sketch directly anymore; we’ll be using it to program the ATMega328 on the breadboard instead. Connect your Arduino to the ATMega328 following this diagram. Because our circuit does not require any of the pins used to program the ATMega328, you can leave the Arduino connected until you’re ready to move the circuit to perfboard. Follow the instructions at https://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/ArduinoISP to flash the bootloader, making sure to choose “ATMega328 on a breadboard (8MHz internal clock)” as your board. If you’re able to flash the bootloader, that’ll confirm that you’ve hooked the ATMega328 up to the Arduino properly. Step 7: Upload the “brows.ino” sketch to the ATMega328 Now that your Arduino is set up to program the ATMega328 chip, upload your sketch. Your breadboarded circuit should start working with the remote control, now being driven by the ATMega328. The Arduino is now just providing power. This is your last chance to (easily) tweak the program; make sure you’re happy with it before proceeding. Then remove the Arduino entirely; try hooking up the battery pack and verify that it still works. Step 8: Move the circuit to perfboard You now need to move everything on the breadboard to the more permanent perfboard, soldering connections as you go. Complete the circuit using the empty DIP sockets in place of the ICs, and only add the ICs when you’re finished. This will help prevent damage to the ICs during soldering from static discharge or overheating; using a socket for the ATMega328 will also mean program changes aren’t impossible, just annoying. When laying out the components, consider the physical space available on the headlamp. When transferring circuits, I find it easiest to remove each wire from the breadboard as I go; when the breadboard is empty, that means I’m finished. Once you’re finished, apply power from the battery pack and check that it’s working. Step 9: Assemble the hardware on the headlamp The details will depend on your headlamp. The motor placement is probably the most important; on my old Petzl, once the bulb assembly was removed, a single zip tie per motor was sufficient to affix it securely. You’ll want each motor’s spindle centered over an eyebrow. To attach each motor’s spindle to its bobbin, I simply wrapped a strip of sturdy adhesive tape around the spindle until the bobbin was a tight friction fit. This has the added benefit of slipping under tension. Congratulations, you’re ready to never ever affix it to your face! Step 10: Don’t affix it to your face You should never attach this to your face for health and safety reasons. Specifically, you shouldn’t wind thread around each bobbin and tape the dangling end to your face with a piece of band-aid adhesive just below the eyebrow (above the eyelid). You also shouldn’t tie a small piece of toothpick to the end of the thread to give the band-aid something to stick to. Going Further For more permanent attachment, don’t ever consider eyebrow piercings clipped with tiny carabiners. There are many left-over I/O pins on the ATMega328, so making your eyebrows sensor-driven is easy. For example, an acoustic sensor could raise eyebrows in case of sudden noise. Or connect a wi-fi module and help pioneer the Internet of Things On My Face. The thread from the motors can be attached to hooks under your lips for a convincing smile when your muscles just aren’t feeling it. For both eyebrow and smile control, an additional H-bridge would support more motors. Now that you’re basically a cyborg, a world of new possibilities is yours.
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Acrylic Gear Clock

Acrylic Gear Clock | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
The clock by DickB1 was the inspiration for my design of a similar mechanism, however, with the gears made from Acrylic. The driving force for the pendulum is an electromagnet similar to the one used by DickB1. However, the magnet is attached to the very end of the pendulum where the driving coil is mounted directly underneath. This applies the electromagnetic force inline with the pendulum swing plane. I saw several magnet-coil arrangements elsewhere. The coil is energized by means of a simple Arduino sketch. A high-precision crystal clock (ChronoDot) is used for time keeping. A small OLED display shows the date and time from the RTC. A number of push buttons on the control box can be used to adjust the RTC clock when it eventually drifts off, supposedly at a rate of less than a minute per year. The mechanical clock has no direct correlation with the electronic clock except that is advanced once a second. To align the hands one has to do it manually. The minute hand can be turned by hand by means of a one-way clutch. Finally, the second hand can be stopped temporarily by by inhibiting the pendulum from swinging. The design steps are organized starting with the basis mounting board that is indented to hang on a wall with a keyhole hanger. Next, we look at the pendulum and the driving coil. Then we design the back plane that holds all shafts and the cowls for the escapement. Lots of gears are cascaded on the shafts ending up driving three concentric shafts for the second, minute and hour. Finally, the front face finishes the gear assembly. The last step is attaching the hands to the concentric center shafts. All parts were designed with CorelDraw XIII. Most parts were machined with a CNC router. VCarve Pro was used to convert DXF files from CorelDraw into toolpaths. A mini lathe came in handy to machine aluminum shaft hubs and spacers. I also built a clock with wooden gears similar to DickB1's design. However the pendulum was omitted and replaced with a small stepper motor which resulted in an unexpected behavior due to erroneous specifications of the motor. This may be described in another Instructables some time.
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7 Geeky Ways to Automate Your Gardening This Spring

7 Geeky Ways to Automate Your Gardening This Spring | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Gardening is often enjoyable, but always time consuming. So why not automate the more demanding gardening tasks to claw back some of that free time? Alas, Spring is almost here. So for those of us with green fingers, we’re faced with a never-ending list of tasks to help us prepare the garden, and keep it blooming throughout the year. You’ll likely find many of these tasks enjoyable, from planning your garden, to watering your plants as the sun sets. But there will undoubtedly be a few that quickly become a chore. With that in mind, browse this list of ways you can automate the gardening tasks you struggle with the most. Just imagine how much more enjoyable your summer could be, if you were only left with the pleasurable parts of gardening. We have mentioned a few of these options before, hidden away in articles about Arduino projects and Home Automation projects. Below, you’ll find the best of these brought together, along with a good deal more. Watering the Lawn Setting up an automated sprinkler system may not be as difficult as you think, nor as expensive. For $110 you can buy Rain Bird’s easy-to-install automated sprinkler kit, which you can set up in a single afternoon. The automatic timer (which attaches to your hose faucet) activates the sprinkler system. Once activated, sprinklers rise from your lawn, and once done, sink back again so they don’t interfere with mowing. If you’d rather build something yourself, there are DIY projects that work in a similar way. Mowing the Lawn How would you feel about having your lawn trimmed each day by your very own robot? The Husqvarna Automower 230 ACX, costing an eye-watering $3,500, tackles “up to 6,000m2 of lawn in any weather, with rough terrain and slopes up to 45%”. The robotic mower takes random paths around your lawn, redirecting itself when it meets an obstacle. The mower can distinguish between shorter and longer blades of grass, with the longer blades being accurately sliced into tiny pieces, which drop back onto the lawn to naturally decompose. If that price tag scares you away, yet you know your way around an Arduino, there are plenty of autonomous lawnmower DIY projects you can replicate, including this particularly detailed guide. Identifying Sick Plants It can be difficult to distinguish sick from healthy plants, but one telltale sign is the amount of energy the plant absorbs from visible light. To help you visually see the difference so you know which plants to tend to, you’ll need a infrared digital camera. Replace the infrared filter with a blue filter (you can pick these up from most photography stores for around $10). You’ve essentially created yourself a “photosynthesis camera” that will tell you which plants are under stress. Next, head over to infragram.org and upload the photos you take of your garden. The site will process the images free of charge. Those plants soaking up less light are the ones that need your care. If you would like more features, you could purchase Infragram’s own point-and-shoot camera for $125. Watering Your Plants Drip irrigation is a way of watering your plants (not lawns) that saves money and reduces the need for fertilizer. By using a network of sensors, valves, and tubing, water is dripped where it’s needed, when it’s needed. An affordable way to set up an automated drip irrigation system is by purchasing a Raindrip kit (~$70). Most kits come with an automated faucet timer that controls when water will be fed to your plants. Expansions can be purchased to customize your system. If you’d rather water your plants with a sprinkler system, use a smart irrigation system like Rachio (from $200). These kinds of systems are designed to keep your plants healthy while also saving water. Rachio can not only be entirely controlled from your smartphone. You can also set automated schedules that edit themselves based on seasonal changes and online weather forecasts. If you’d like to build your own DIY Arduino version, that’s possible, too. Keeping Your Plants Healthy We’ve mentioned both Koubachi ($100-$150 per sensor) and Parrot Flower Power ($60 per sensor) before, but their array of features makes both options worth mentioning again. These sensors measure all of your plants’ vitals including soil moisture, sunlight, infrared light, ambient temperature, and more. Once connected to the mobile or web apps, the sensors also have access to species information, weather data, and user preferences. With all this information combined, you’re given detailed care advice for each of your plants. This makes for a powerful piece of plant-care tech that’s especially useful for more valuable, hard-to-care-for plants. If you’re looking for even more automation features, Parrot Flower Power has some fantastic integrations with IFTTT (read our guide). These include turning on Philips Hue lights when certain conditions are met, and setting an event in your calendar to remind you when to water your plants. Chasing Away Animals If you live in an area where animals such as raccoons and deer cause havoc in your garden, you need to make yourself a Garden Gnome Drone (for around $300). If you know how to configure an Arduino, you can find more information about the project here. What you’ll be building in this DIY project is essentially a guard drone for your garden. When an infrared motion sensor that’s linked to the drone detects movement, the vehicle takes off and flies a pre-configured flight-path around your garden to scare away those beasts of nature, before returning back to its recharging station. If you decide to take on this project, we’d love to hear how you get on. Growing in Awkward Spaces If you’d love to grow your own herbs or veggies, but just don’t have the outdoor space to make that a reality, take a look at the Fizzy Farm hydrophonic systems. If you have no outdoor space at all, you can purchase an indoor system ($150). If you only have a small yard, you can purchase an outdoor system ($200). By using a combination of nutrient powder and a powerful oxygen pump to oxygenate the water, plants are able to thrive much more easily. This system helps plants to grow in spaces that would usually be too warm or too cold, while also stabilizing the PH levels of the water. This means that anyone can now grow small plants to the highest standard, even in the unfriendliest of places. What Else Would You Like to See Automated? These products cover a large portion of gardening tasks, but not all of them. We still haven’t heard of a decent home-use automation option for weeding or sowing seeds. I guess we need to get our hands dirty somehow, right? What other aspects of gardening would you like to see automated? Or would you rather see gardening remain a physical past time that avoids encroaching technology? Image Credits:Robot with lawn mower by Kjpargeter via Shutterstock
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The Infrared Theremin

The Infrared Theremin | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
The traditional theremin is more or less an audio oscillator with two metal rods. Using proximity sensing, one rod controls the pitch of the oscillator and the other controls the volume. [Teodor Costachiou] apparently asked himself the excellent question: Why does the proximity sensor have to use capacitance? The result is an Arduino-based theremin that uses IR sensors to determine hand position. [Teodor] used a particular type of Arduino–the Flip and Click–because he wanted to use Click boards for the IR sensors and also to generate sound via an MP3 board based around a VS1053. The trick is that the VS1053 has a realtime MIDI mode, and that’s how this Theremin makes it tones. Of course, a real theremin is distinctly analog. A tiny change in hand position creates a small change in the output. With digital sensors and sound generation, the output is more in discrete steps, but according to [Teodor], the effect isn’t bad. We were hoping for a video (or, at least, an audio clip) but [Teodor] pleaded that he’s not a musician. He did include a video of a real theremin performance with his post, and you can see it below. But that’s a real analog theremin. If you want to build something more traditional, have a look at Open Theremin. Or, if you want to get your exercise, how about trying a terpsitone. If you do, and can play the theme to The Day the Earth Stood Still, we’d love to see the video. Meanwhile, if you didn’t know the theremin had an espionage connection, you haven’t been staying current on Hackaday posts.
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7-Port USB Hub For Raspberry Pi

7-Port USB Hub For Raspberry Pi | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
UUGear have just released a new 7-port USB hub add-on board for the Raspberry Pi. It is an updated version of the device they released in 2014. It has the same footprint as the Pi and can be attached to all Raspberry Pi versions which currently includes Models A, B, A+, B+, 2B, 3B and Zero. Unlike most other Pi add-ons boards this product is designed to be mounted underneath the Pi which keeps the top surface free for messing about with GPIO pins and the camera interface. Package Contents 1x 7-port USB hub board 1x USB to mini USB cable 2x Crown head pogo pins 4x M2.5 x 10 + 6mm Copper Standoffs 4x M2.5 screws 4x M2.5 nuts Specifications Dimension: 85mm x 56mm x 10mm Weight: 29g (net weight without any accessory) Power Mode: Bus-Power / Self-Power Standards: USB 2.0 and 1.1 compatibility, Multiple Transaction Translator (MTT) Working Voltage: 5V DC Static Current: 4mA Maximum Output Current: 2A for all ports in self-power mode, 500mA for all ports in bus-power mode Operating Temperature: 0°C~70°C Storage Temperature: -20°C~60°C Humidity: 0~80%RH, no condensing The board mounts nicely under the Pi using the supplied brass pillars. The pogo pins make contact with the underside of the Pi and are a neat solution to providing power to the Pi. The miniUSB to USB cable connects the board to a USB port on the Pi. The use of a miniUSB port ensures you don’t get confused with the microUSB port which is for 5V power only. One of the best features is the back powering. This allows you to provide power to the hub from a single power supply and the hub then powers the Pi. I much prefer using a single supply and this keeps the setup nice and neat. If you are planning on plugging in 7 USB devices the last thing you need is another power supply wire getting in the way. When I tested mine I used the 5V/2A supply that came with my HDMIPi screen. The supplied spring loaded “pogo pins” connect 5V and ground to the rear of the GPIO header for a really neat solution. Unlike some USB hubs out there the UUGear device features MTT (Multiple Transaction Translators) which allows each port to run at full speed. Obviously the total throughput is limited by the connection to the Pi but it prevents a USB 2.0 device being hampered by the use of a single USB 1.0 device on the same hub. Another innovative feature is the 7 pin header on the top of the board. These 7 digital output pins allow you to monitor which USB ports are in use. They use 3.3V logic levels so can be connected directly to the Pi’s GPIO pins if required. Potential Applications Obviously if you only need to connect a keyboard and mouse you might not see the point of 7 USB ports. However for more elaborate projects the standard 4 ports might not be enough. For example 7 ports would allow you to create a security project with 2 webcams, WiFi dongle, Bluetooth dongle, USB flash drive, mouse and a keyboard. I’m not sure but I also wonder if you could attach 7 SD card readers and re-image 7 SD cards at the same time? With the recent release of the Pi 3 you save two ports by having onboard WiFi and Bluetooth but I can still see some projects where additional USB ports would be required. Documentation As I’ve said before so many add-ons are let down with poor documentation. The UUGear hub isn’t one of these and the user manual is very clear and well presented. It covers the various configurations you might use and doesn’t assume everyone is using a Pi 2. You can order a hub from the UUGear Product Page. If you haven’t already take a look at the Witty Pi which is another high quality UUGear board for the Raspberry Pi that allows scheduled power on/off.
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Electric Ivory #Arduino #MusicMonday

Electric Ivory #Arduino #MusicMonday | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Check out all the Circuit Playground Episodes! Our new kid’s show and subscribe! Have an amazing project to share? Join the SHOW-AND-TELL every Wednesday night at 7:30pm ET on Google+ Hangouts. Join us every Wednesday night at 8pm ET for Ask an Engineer! Learn resistor values with Mho’s Resistance or get the best electronics calculator for engineers “Circuit Playground” – Adafruit’s Apps!
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Let’s warm up for Maker Faire Rome 4th edition!

Let’s warm up for Maker Faire Rome 4th edition! | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
By Zoe Romano Last friday in Rome during the press conference of Maker Faire Rome 4th edition, Riccardo Luna together with Massimo Banzi announced that next October the event is going to become “better, bigger and stronger”. A new location by Fiera di Roma building will host six pavilions l’article complet ici Via:: Blog Arduino
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RS – Flexible Arduino prototyping platform for IoT and M2M applications

RS – Flexible Arduino prototyping platform for IoT and M2M applications | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Aimed at Internet-of-Things (IoT) and M2M applications, a flexible Arduino form-factor prototyping platform – the Arrow SmartEverything development board is now available from RS Components. SmartEverything combines SIGFOX, Bluetooth and Near-Field Communication (NFC) wireless technologies with GPS and a suite of embedded sensors. Atmel’s SAM D21 ultra low-power ARM Cortex-M0+ Microcontroller is used to integrate the featured devices. SIGFOX connectivity is a particular highlight; the embedded Telit LE51-868 S Wireless Module gives design engineers access to the rapidly expanding SIGFOX cellular wireless network. Across the world millions of IoT devices already utilise the low-power connectivity SIGFOX provides. More news from RS Components Enquire About This Product Keep up to date with our latest news: Android AppiPhone AppiPad AppTwitter
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RS – Flexible Arduino prototyping platform for IoT and M2M applications

RS – Flexible Arduino prototyping platform for IoT and M2M applications | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Aimed at Internet-of-Things (IoT) and M2M applications, a flexible Arduino form-factor prototyping platform – the Arrow SmartEverything development board is now available from RS Components. SmartEverything combines SIGFOX, Bluetooth and Near-Field Communication (NFC) wireless technologies with GPS and a suite of embedded sensors. Atmel’s SAM D21 ultra low-power ARM Cortex-M0+ Microcontroller is used to integrate the featured devices. SIGFOX connectivity is a particular highlight; the embedded Telit LE51-868 S Wireless Module gives design engineers access to the rapidly expanding SIGFOX cellular wireless network. Across the world millions of IoT devices already utilise the low-power connectivity SIGFOX provides. More news from RS Components Enquire About This Product Keep up to date with our latest news: Android AppiPhone AppiPad AppTwitter
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Arduino / Pi small sensor mounting plate modified by clifton2

Arduino / Pi small sensor mounting plate modified by clifton2 | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Summary Revised version of my Arduino sensor mounting plate. This one is mountable by the four pillar holes and includes side mounts to connect more than one sensor plate together. Print Settings Printer: prusa I3 Rafts: No Supports: No Resolution: 0.2mm Infill: 20%
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Seven outstanding Micro Bit projects - BBC News

Seven outstanding Micro Bit projects - BBC News | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
The Micro Bit - a small computer designed to power internet-connected projects - is being handed out to thousands of British school children. The device has been made for Year Sevens (11-to-12-year-olds) and equivalents as part of an initiative spearheaded by the BBC. Microsoft, Samsung, ARM and several other organisations that teach coding to youngsters are also involved. The roll-out is happening later in the school year than originally planned. But there is undoubtedly pent-up enthusiasm for the computer. Unlike other budget computers - such as the Raspberry Pi - the machine is meant to be programmed via the web, rather than being connected to a keyboard and screen of its own. So, what can it do? As a standalone device it can be made to flash its LEDs in sequence and take readings from several built-in sensors, but when added to other hardware the possibilities are limitless. Below are seven projects by some of those who got their hands on the tech early. Sent into the stratosphere The initial batch of Micro Bits were very limited in number. But that didn't stop one school launching their copy more than 32km (20 miles) into the air. One of the pupils at Rishworth School in West Yorkshire wrote a program that used a heat sensor to log changes in temperature and show the current reading on the computer's LEDs. Her classmates then attached the kit to a helium balloon and let it fly upwards. "Her code measured the temperature in the stratosphere, which is pretty awesome," recalled the teacher in charge, Peter Bell. "The kids were absolutely buzzing about the whole project." But he added that anyone thinking of repeating the initiative should not do so lightly. "We had to get civil aviation authority approval and were given a two-hour window to launch," he explained. "And on its descent, it initially fell for 14 seconds travelling at up to 180mph [290km/h]. "At one point National Air Traffic Services apparently rerouted all the aircraft around Nottingham because there was essentially a missile travelling towards the airspace, but the parachute deployed when it got to an atmosphere where enough air was hitting it." The equipment was later recovered from a farmer's field. Big screen Micro Bits are by design small enough to fit inside a child's pocket. So, it seems a bit obtuse to try and turn them into a giant display board. Even so, Kitronik - an electronics parts supplier involved in the Micro Bit initiative - posed itself the challenge using 1,009 prototypes it had been given access to. The company's director used Microsoft's Touch Develop web interface to write three programs: the first to hold the image data on a "master" Micro Bit and convert it into messages sent to the other computers the second to determine which data should be sent to each of the 40 columns of computers arranged into the display the third to pass image data from one Micro Bit to another after a brief delay so that images appeared to scroll across the screen "I realised early on that the big challenge on this project wasn't going to be writing the three different versions of code - though this did take a number of days - but was going to be to assemble the display," recalled Geoff Hampson. "Which is why we called on a team of volunteers to help wire it all up." A total of 230m (755ft) of wiring and 5,000 bolts were required to complete the project, which was unveiled at the Bett tech show in January. Autism tool Six students from London's Highgate School came up with the idea of using the Micro Bit to help people with autism recognise other people's emotional states, as part of a one-day coding challenge earlier this year. People with the condition can struggle to read expressions and respond appropriately as a result of the disability. The team coded the computer so that a user could scroll through a series of graphics, shown via the LEDs, of faces presenting different moods. When they found a match they could press another button to make the LEDs state what the image represented - for example "happy", "sad" or "angry". "I think it was fantastic for these students to tackle a potentially difficult and complex issue such as disability and autism," said Holly Margerison from the Institution of Engineering and Technology, which organised the Faraday Projects event. "I also think this could be a great partnership activity, so students with and without autism could [further] work together on this product. "One thing which strikes me is that the students clearly understand the place of coding in the world and understand the ways in which it can enhance and improve their lives." Hand-to-eye co-ordination ARM's in-house Micro Bit demo is deliberately simple by design. The chip creator - whose processor architecture is used by the mini-computer - got one of its team to juggle three of the devices and streamed data from their acceleration sensors to the internet via a Bluetooth link. To do so, they made use of Google's new Eddystone communication protocol and then tracked the readings - recorded at a rate of 200 times a second - via a web-based application. The information was used to create a graph tracking the rate that each of the Micro Bits sped up and slowed down. "We can detect in a program run on the Micro Bit when it is falling, and that means we can know how long it is falling for and how high we threw it," explained Jonny Austin, one of the engineers involved. "So, if I am juggling very unevenly you might see that every third throw I actually don't throw one of the Micro Bits nearly as high, and that would be represented by a much flatter peak on the graph." In theory, he added, it should be possible to spot patterns that could help a juggler-in-training identify problems with their technique. Heading North Pupils at Eastlea Community School in London came up with the idea of using a Micro Bit to keep a small aircraft on track as it headed toward the North Pole. The computer was programmed to trigger one of two motors whenever the vehicle drifted off course to steer it back to its destination. "The students came up with a working proof-of-concept but the gondola that they made was a little bit too weighty," said their teacher Steve Richards. "Air regulations would have also been a problem." But, he added, the class took these issues in their stride and are now developing a Micro Bit-steered paddle steamer boat that will make use of solar and wind energy. Mr Richards has previously taught classes using another British low-cost computer - the Raspberry Pi - but says he believes the Micro Bit is better suited for younger age groups. "It's been designed at a lower level that allows children to understand more quickly the concepts that you are trying to get across," he explained. "With the Raspberry Pi there are a lot of things that don't make immediate sense. So, I think the Micro Bit will make a great stepping stone that engages younger children before they want to do more serious projects that would require something like the Pi." Racing cars The Bloodhound Project - an effort to set a new land speed record of more than 1,000mph (1,609km/h) - has its own Micro Bit spin-off. Since the start of January, hundreds of children have been invited to carve their own model cars out of foam and blast them along a track using black-powder rockets fitted to their rears. The computers are slotted inside to measure the rocket cars' fastest speeds, average speeds and changes in thrust. The children then use the feedback to improve their designs. "This is something that teachers don't normally want to do because there is a lot of risk assessment involved," said Graeme Lawrie, one of the organisers and director of innovation at Sevenoaks school in Kent. "But these kind of wow factors are few and far between, and it provides the children with inspiration and enthusiasm for Stem (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) subjects." As if that wasn't enough incentive to take part, the teams that make the fastest models are being promised a chance to have their names added to the fin of the actual Bloodhound supersonic car. Machine music Not all the early Micro Bit projects were targeted at children or involved coding. Dr Rebecca Fiebrink got hold of a device to use as part of her research into computer music at Goldsmiths, University of London. The lecturer used a program called Wekinator, which teaches a computer to recognise certain inputs and map them to different sounds. By connecting up a Micro Bit she was able to create music by twisting, tilting and drawing shapes in front of her with the mini-computer. "One example I made was a simple drum machine that I control using tilts," she told the BBC. "I can also use it to recognise gestures that I draw in the air and to create more experimental sounds. "It's a really exciting time right now because of the growing availability of relatively cheap-to-use sensing platforms, and the Micro Bit is a great way to get started building things." BBC technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones will be doing a live Q&A about the Micro Bit on the BBC Facebook page shortly after 1330GMT.
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Justin Moore's curator insight, May 15, 2:47 AM
Very engaging lessons here. Affordable technology now makes it possible to design lessons that give students opportunities to learn and create.
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Ten days to enter our Astro Pi competition - Raspberry Pi

Ten days to enter our Astro Pi competition - Raspberry Pi | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
GETTING STARTED WITH SONIC PI | RASPBERRY PI LEARNING RESOURCES Sonic Pi is an open-source programming environment, designed for creating new sounds with code in a live coding environment; it was developed by Dr Sam Aaron at the University of Cambridge. He uses the software to perform live with his band.
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Mozilla laying off part of Connected Devices team after death of Firefox phones

Mozilla laying off part of Connected Devices team after death of Firefox phones | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Mozilla is laying off a portion of its Connected Devices team, which worked on Firefox OS and Firefox phones before recently shifting over to more experimental products. When asked about layoffs by The Verge, Mozilla's senior vice president of Connected Devices, Ari Jaaksi, confirmed that the company has "made the decision to reduce the size" of the team. Jaaksi says that a "small" number of employees have been impacted, some of whom may be moved into positions elsewhere in the company. CONNECTED DEVICES IS SUPPOSED TO ACT LIKE A STARTUP WITHIN MOZILLA The layoffs follow Connected Devices' move away from Firefox phones, which failed to gain traction and were ultimately killed in December. Mozilla has since said that it would use parts of Firefox OS to build Internet of Things devices; that includes putting Firefox OS on TVs. VentureBeat reported in December that the team was looking at putting Firefox OS on a TV streaming stick, a router, and a Raspberry Pi computer built into a keyboard. The Connected Devices unit is meant to "emulate a tech start-up culture," putting small amounts of resources toward many different projects as it searches for an idea that's strong enough to see to completion. Mozilla says that its layoffs are meant "to support this new product strategy and innovation process." Jaaksi's full statement is below: "We recently shifted our Firefox OS strategy to focus on exploring the IoT market and identifying Connected Devices experiments through a gated innovation process to help us test early-stage ideas. To support this new product strategy and innovation process, we have made the decision to reduce the size of the Connected Devices team. While the number of individuals impacted is small, our first priority is to make sure every employee affected is taken care of. We are working with each individual to find a new role at Mozilla or provide them with an exit package including severance, benefits coverage and professional outplacement services."
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Raspberry Pi 3: Raspbian Linux and NOOBS distributions updated | ZDNet

Raspberry Pi 3: Raspbian Linux and NOOBS distributions updated | ZDNet | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Photo: J.A. Watson New releases of Raspbian GNU/Linux and the NOOBS installer package appeared on the Raspberry Pi Downloads page last week. These have come very soon after the initial Pi 3 support releases, so they appear to be primarily aimed at bug fixes and enhancements for the new hardware. The Raspbian release notes mention that there are firmware and kernel updates. I couldn't find any release notes or other information about the NOOBS release; hopefully that will come along soon. Photos of the Raspberry Pi through the ages: From the prototype to Pi 3 A walkthrough of every model of the Raspberry Pi to be released dating back to an early prototype in 2006. Read More I have loaded and briefly tested both Raspbian and NOOBS on all of my various Raspberry Pi systems. The best news of this release is that the NOOBS installer now recognizes the Raspberry Pi 3 built-in wireless network adapter, so it is now possible to install from NOOBS on a Raspberry Pi 3 without having to use a wired network connection or a second wireless adapter. More good news on the NOOBS distribution: openELEC now appears in the list when a network connection is established. I also tested the Bluetooth support in Raspbian, and found that it is still not possible to connect a Bluetooth pointing device (mouse) using the Blueman utility. Of course it is still possible using the CLI bluetootctl utility, and once the device is paired the Blueman icon in the top panel, it shows the correct status and detailed information for it. I am still hopeful that these last few problems will be taken care of soon. It doesn't even need another release, really, just some nice updates along the way. I will continue to check on the progress periodically. READ MORE ON THE RASPBERRY PI 3 More hands-on with the Raspberry Pi 3: Bluetooth, OpenELEC, and Ubuntu MATE Raspberry Pi 3: The inside story from the new $35 computer's creator Raspberry Pi 3 photos: A closer look at the new board Photos of the Raspberry Pi through the ages: From the prototype to Pi 3 Why Android and even Windows might make it onto the Raspberry Pi 3 Raspberry Pi 3 out now: Still $35 but up to 50 percent faster
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ThinkComputers Podcast #56 - EVGA Z170 Classified K, Synology's First Router, AMD's Announcements From GDC & More! | Computer Hardware Reviews - ThinkComputers.org

ThinkComputers Podcast #56 - EVGA Z170 Classified K, Synology's First Router, AMD's Announcements From GDC & More! | Computer Hardware Reviews - ThinkComputers.org | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
ThinkComputers Podcast #56 – EVGA Z170 Classified K, Synology’s First Router, AMD’s Announcements From GDC & More! Mar 20, 2016 Bob Buskirk Podcast 0 In this episode of our weekly tech podcast we talk about our review of the EVGA Z170 Classified K Motherboard, Synology’s first ever router, all of AMD’s announcements from GDC and much more! Leave your comments below to let us know what you think. Also everything that is covered in this podcast has been linked below so you can check it out yourself! Podcast: Play in new window | Download Subscribe: iTunes | Android | RSS This Week’s Podcast is brought to you by: Amazon Guest This Week: Derrick Reviews Covered in this Episode: – EVGA Z170 Classified K Motherboard Review – Synology RT1900ac Router Review – SanDisk Connect Wireless Stick Review – Native Union JUMP Cable Review Other Content Covered in this Episode: – Case Mod Friday: Project Biohazard Tech News Covered in this Episode: – AMD Officially Unveils The Radeon Pro Duo Graphics Card – AMD’s Radeon Pro Duo Destroys The R9 295X2 and GeForce GTX Titan Z – AMD GPU Architecture Roadmap Revealed, Could Polaris Skip HBM2? – AMD, Polaris, Polaris 10, Engineering Sample, Graphics Card – AMD Working On VR Headset With 4K Per Eye! – Sulon Q Powered by AMD, is the World’s Most Advanced VR+AR Headset – AMD Zen 8-Core Summit Ridge CPUs Could Launch In October – NVIDIA’s Next Graphics Card Series Will Be The GeForce X80 Series – WD Announces PiDrive, A 314GB Hard Drive For Raspberry Pi – Razer Announces the 2016 Blade Notebook – Razer Accepts Pre-orders for the Razer Core External Graphics Solution – Intel Announces The Skull Canyon Gaming NUC – The Division Made Over 330 Million in First 5 Days Other Things in this Episode – Bob has been working out lately – Derrick went and saw 10 Cloverfield Lane Coming Up Next Week: – Water Cooling 101 Episode 6 – Intel Compute Stick – Patriot Viper Elite DDR4-2400 16GB Memory Kit – OCZ Trion 150 480 GB Solid State Drive – Griffin PowerDock 5 AMD, EVGA, GDC, Podcast, Synology, Tech News
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7 Arduino Projects For Beginners

7 Arduino Projects For Beginners | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Arduino is a company that designs and manufactures micro-controller based kits for building digital devices that can sense and control objects in the physical world. Here are some small suitable Arduino projects for beginners. The mood lamp This is one of the easiest Arduino Projects For Beginners and allows a beginner to get their feet wet in this micro-controller technology, as well as giving you the perfect light source that also reflects your mood. Construct and code an ambient light using an Arduino board and some common circuit components. The single cell battery tester Although the use of alkaline batteries is on the downturn, we still need them to power remote controls and some mobile devices. AA, and AAA cell batteries are still widely used to enable children’s toys and other small devices. What better way to test them than this inexpensive project, which will increase your knowledge of Arduino technology. These batteries carry much less than 5 V so let’s create a battery tester to get us on our way to being competent with this technology. An AA battery, when new, will have a charge of not more than 1.5 volts and this will decrease with use, so we will express the power level by using LED lights. We simply take the analogue reading and then convert that to volts. Arduino alarm system This simple yet effective alarm system uses a motion detector and emits a high-pitched tone, as well as a set of flashing LED lights. It isn’t going to protect your whole house, but is ideal for that cupboard where you keep your secret stuff stashed. The traffic light controller This simple idea is a great way to learn Arduino programming. The traffic light controller uses red, yellow and green LED lights to recreate a traffic light on your breadboard. You can adjust the code to alter the time settings, or even the sequence itself. Check out this link for more info on Arduino products. Arduino powered temperature controller This is ideal for growing plants indoors, or controlling the temperature of a reptile cage. With one Arduino and a few parts, you can create something that would be quite expensive to buy, at a fraction of the cost. Re-create the arcade classic “Pong” With an Arduino, a few parts, and your TV screen, you can create this arcade game that Atari brought us way back. Using parts found in the Arduino startup kit, you can link to your TV screen with a composite cable, giving you hours of fun. A bit of coding and soldering will make this game a reality. Here are some more ideas on cool Arduino projects that will enhance your Arduino knowledge. Create your own ambi-light This simple light will react to the light on your TV screen. With programmable LED strips, one can have ambient lighting that reacts to the images shown on your TV screen. There are lots more cool Arduino Projects For Beginners online to help you get started with Arduino technology, and tutorials are available for all the above projects. Arduino products have opened the door to a new range of possibilities with add on peripheral support.
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Make a simple wireless RF robot using Arduino!

Make a simple wireless RF robot using Arduino! | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Hi, This is my first instructable and in this tutorial, I'm going to show you, how to build a simple wireless robot using Arduino and simple RF modules (the ones that you get for $1 US nowadays on eBay). You may think that Bluetooth modules might be a more simple and effective way to make wireless bots, but lets face it, bluetooth modules are a tad pricey than these cheap buggers (You may argue over that, but in my country the HC-06 bluetooth module is around 3 times the price of RF modules). And also, I want to keep the budget low, so digging in this project isn't going to be much costly :-) The main thing about this project is that you will be punching keys on your keyboard and making the robot move accordingly. This is a very crude project, and you can make it better by making a GUI, which can be built easily using Processing. So, here we are going to punch in the commands in the serial monitor of the arduino connected to the host computer; the arduino will read the data put in and send it out via the transmitter. The arduino on bot will catch the signal through a receiver and will act accordingly (like move the motors forward when 'w' is pressed). I have taken help from various tutorials and the arduino forums. So first of all, I want to thank the great people who helped me up in the forums. Also I got the codes from this website listed below, and tweaked them as per my requirements. http://www.libremechanics.com/?q=node/31 So , I wanna thank the author for sharing this code ! I will try to keep things as simple as possible. Also if any of you have questions, feel free to post them in comments or email me at vinutyagi@gmail.com So, lets jump right into it. Hope you'll enjoy it :-) Please keep reading the notes given alongside the pictures. They'll help you. Take my word for it :-)
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